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Symptoms Of Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Gestational Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. It's different from both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Like other forms of diabetes, it causes high levels of glucose (a simple sugar) in the blood. Gestational diabetes develops when various pregnancy hormones and body changes — including weight gain — cause cells to use insulin (a hormone that regulates blood glucose) less efficiently. As many as 9.2 percent of pregnant women in the United States develop gestational diabetes, according to a 2014 report in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease. Symptoms of Gestational Diabetes For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause any noticeable signs or symptoms. If you do experience symptoms (which are caused by high blood glucose levels), they may include: Blurred vision Fatigue Excessive thirst and urination Nausea and vomiting not associated with normal pregnancy Weight loss Increased rate of infections, particularly in the urinary tract (bladder), vagina, and skin These symptoms tend to go away after giving birth, when blood glucose levels return to normal. Gestational Diabetes Complications Uncontrolled gestational diabetes can cause a number of complications in both pregnant women and their babies. It can raise your risk of developing preeclampsia, a potentially deadly condition during pregnancy that involves high blood pressure, too much protein in the urine, swelling, and depression. You may require a Cesarean section (C-section) because your baby is considerably larger than normal, a condition known as macrosomia. And if your blood glucose levels aren't tightly controlled during pregnancy, your baby will have an increased risk of dying before or soon after birth, and may be born with: Temporary hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) Jaundice ( Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes (gd)

Gestational Diabetes (gd)

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes (GD) happens when you have too much sugar (glucose) in your blood during pregnancy. Your blood sugar levels can go up when your body isn’t producing enough of a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps: the cells in your body to get energy from blood sugar your body to store any blood sugar that isn’t needed During pregnancy, hormones make it harder for your body to use insulin efficiently. So your body has to make extra insulin, especially from mid-pregnancy onwards. If your body can't make enough extra insulin, your blood sugar levels will rise and you may develop GD. Having too much sugar in your blood can cause problems for you and your baby, so you’ll have extra care during your pregnancy. On average, GD affects one mum-to-be in 20. GD goes away after your baby is born, because it's a condition that's only caused by pregnancy. The other types of diabetes, which are not caused by pregnancy, are type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Some women have diabetes, without realising it, before they become pregnant. If this happens to you, it will be diagnosed as GD during your pregnancy. What are the symptoms of gestational diabetes? You probably won't notice any symptoms if you have GD. That's why you'll be monitored by your midwife, and offered a test if she thinks you're at risk. GD symptoms are like normal pregnancy symptoms, and easy to miss. By the time you have clear symptoms, your blood sugar levels may be worryingly high (hyperglycaemia) . Symptoms of hyperglycaemia include: feeling more thirsty needing to wee more often than usual having a dry mouth feeling more tired getting recurring infections, such as thrush, and UTIs having blurred vision If you have any of these symptoms, tell your midwife or doctor straig Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Symptoms

Gestational Diabetes Symptoms

Some women develop diabetes only during pregnancy; this is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is defined as glucose intolerance that is first diagnosed in pregnancy, and it occurs when pregnancy hormones affect how the body makes or uses insulin, which is a hormone that converts sugar in food into energy the body uses. If your body does not make enough insulin or if it does not use the insulin appropriately, the level of sugar in the blood rises to an unacceptable level. This is called hyperglycemia and means you have too much sugar in your blood. Occasionally, hormones made by the placenta can also hamper the actions of insulin, and gestational diabetes can occur. Several other factors can affect your glucose levels, including stress, the time of day (glucose values are often higher in the morning), the amount of exercise you do and the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Symptoms of gestational diabetes include the following: Blurred vision Tingling or numbness in the hands and/or feet Excessive thirst Frequent urination Sores that heal slowly Excess fatigue [Read more about Fatigue] Pregnancy causes most women to urinate more often and to feel hungrier, so having these symptoms does not always mean that a woman has diabetes. Talk with your health care provider if you have these symptoms so you can be tested for diabetes. Gestational diabetes affects about 10 percent of all pregnancies. After pregnancy is over, most women who experienced gestational diabetes return to normal, and the problem disappears. However, if gestational diabetes occurs with one pregnancy, there is an increased chance it will recur in subsequent pregnancies. Gestational diabetes occurs for two reasons. One is that the mother’s body produces less insulin during pregnancy. The s Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Has your doctor diagnosed you with gestational diabetes (GD or GDM), a form of diabetes that appears only during pregnancy? While it might feel overwhelming at first, it turns out that this pregnancy complication is much more common than you might think. In fact, up to 9.2 percent of pregnant women have GD, according to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Know that with careful monitoring and treatment, it can be managed, and you can have a safe and healthy pregnancy. READ MORE: What causes gestational diabetes? Who's most at risk? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? What are the complications? How can you prevent gestational diabetes? How is it treated? What happens to mom and baby after birth? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes usually starts between week 24 and week 28 of pregnancy when hormones from the placenta block insulin — a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the body's metabolism of fats and carbs and helps the body turn sugar into energy — from doing its job and prevent the body from regulating the increased blood sugar of pregnancy effectively. This causes hyperglycemia (or high levels of sugar in the blood), which can damage the nerves, blood vessels and organs in your body. Who’s most at risk for gestational diabetes? While researchers aren't certain why some women get gestational diabetes while others don’t, they do know that you may be at an increased risk if: You are overweight. Having a BMI of 30 or more going into pregnancy is one of the most common risk factors for gestational diabetes because the extra weight affects insulin's ability to properly keep blood sugar levels in check. You have a higher level of abdominal fat. Recent research published in the American Di Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Overview Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there's good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you've had gestational diabetes, you're at risk for type 2 diabetes. You'll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. Symptoms For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. When to see a doctor If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you're pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby's health. Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy. To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team wil Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes (diabetes In Pregnancy)

Gestational Diabetes (diabetes In Pregnancy)

Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that you may develop when you’re pregnant and your blood glucose (sugar) level is too high. It’s also known as GDM, which stands for gestational diabetes mellitus. This condition can lead to problems for both you and your baby if you don’t control it. There are lots of treatments, as well as changes you can make to your lifestyle, that can help to reduce its impact on your pregnancy. Worried about diabetes? Get a picture of your current health and potential future health risks with one of our health assessments. Find out more today. About our health information At Bupa we produce a wealth of free health information for you and your family. We believe that trustworthy information is essential in helping you make better decisions about your health and care. Here are just a few of the ways in which our core editorial principles have been recognised. Legal disclaimer This information was published by Bupa's Health Content Team and is based on reputable sources of medical evidence. It has been reviewed by appropriate medical or clinical professionals. Photos are only for illustrative purposes and do not reflect every presentation of a condition. The information contained on this page and in any third party websites referred to on this page is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice nor is it intended to be for medical diagnosis or treatment. Third party websites are not owned or controlled by Bupa and any individual may be able to access and post messages on them. Bupa is not responsible for the content or availability of these third party websites. We do not accept advertising on this page. For more details on how we produce our content and its sources, visit the 'About our health informati Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is It? Gestational diabetes is the appearance of higher-than-expected blood sugars during pregnancy. Once it occurs, it lasts throughout the remainder of the pregnancy. It affects up to 14 percent of all pregnant women in the United States. It is more common in African-American, Latino, Native American and Asian women compared with Caucasians. Like the other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes results when sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream can't be moved efficiently into body cells such as muscle cells that normally use sugar as a body fuel. The hormone insulin helps to move sugar from the bloodstream into the cells. In gestational diabetes, the body does not respond well to insulin, unless insulin can be produced or provided in larger amounts. In most women, the disorder goes away when the pregnancy ends, but women who have had gestational diabetes are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later. Diabetes occurs during pregnancy because hormones produced in a pregnancy make the body resistant to insulin's effects. These hormones include growth hormone and human placental lactogen. Both of these hormones are essential to a healthy pregnancy and fetus, but they partially block the action of insulin. In most women, the pancreas reacts to this situation by producing enough additional insulin to overcome the insulin resistance. In women with gestational diabetes, not enough extra insulin is produced, so sugar accumulates in the bloodstream. As the fetus grows larger, larger quantities of the hormones are produced. Because it is the time when these hormone levels are highest, gestational diabetes usually starts in the last trimester of pregnancy. After delivery, the body's hormones quickly return to non-pregnant levels. Typically, the amount of insulin th Continue reading >>

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Diabetes and preeclampsia are among two of the reasons why regular prenatal visits are so important. Gestational Diabetes: The Basics Chances are you'll sail through pregnancy without trouble. But even if you're feeling great, you should still seek regular prenatal care because some health problems that could hurt your baby are symptomless. These include gestational diabetes, which raises blood sugar levels during pregnancy, and preeclampsia, a form of high blood pressure. But with early detection and treatment, you can manage these problems and still have a healthy baby. What Is It? Gestational diabetes occurs when pregnancy hormones interfere with the body's ability to use insulin, the hormone that turns blood sugar into energy, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Each year, up to 4 percent of women develop this serious illness in pregnancy. While most women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms, a small number may experience extreme hunger, thirst, or fatigue. How Do I Know If I Have It? Your doctor will probably screen you for gestational diabetes between your 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. If you have certain risk factors (see "Who's at Risk?" below), your doctor may opt to screen you sooner. During your screening, you'll drink a sugary liquid, then take a blood test. If your blood sugar levels appear high, you'll need to take a longer test, during which you'll drink more liquid and your blood sugar will be tested several times to determine whether you have gestational diabetes. What Are the Risks Associated with It? Women who fail to seek treatment for gestational diabetes run the risk of giving birth to big babies (9 pounds or more), since much of the extra sugar in the mother's blood ends up going to the fetus. Larger babies are more likely to suffer b Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

During pregnancy, some women develop high blood sugar levels. This condition is known as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). GDM typically develops between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it’s estimated to occur in up to 9.2 percent of pregnancies. If you develop GDM while you’re pregnant, it doesn’t mean that you had diabetes before your pregnancy or will have it afterward. But GDM does raise your risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. If poorly managed, it can also raise your child’s risk of developing diabetes and add other risk factors to you and your baby during pregnancy and delivery. It’s rare for GDM to cause symptoms. If you do experience symptoms, they will likely be mild. They may include: fatigue blurred vision excessive thirst excessive need to urinate The exact cause of GDM is unknown, but hormones likely play a role. When you’re pregnant, your body produces larger amounts of some hormones, including: human placental lactogen estrogen hormones that increase insulin resistance These hormones affect your placenta and help sustain your pregnancy. Over time, the amount of these hormones in your body increases. They may interfere with the action of insulin, the hormone that regulates your blood sugar. Insulin helps move glucose out of your blood into cells, where it’s used for energy. If you don’t have enough insulin, or you have high levels of hormones that prevent insulin from working properly, your blood glucose levels may rise. This can cause GDM. You’re at higher risk of developing GDM if you: are over the age of 25 have high blood pressure have a family history of diabetes were overweight before you became pregnant have previously given birth to a baby weighin Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition of abnormally raised blood sugar levels that may occur in the second part of the pregnancy and goes away once the baby is born. Some women with gestational diabetes may need no treatment, some need a strict diet and others may need insulin injections. As GDM is a condition that occurs during pregnancy, it is not the same as having pre-existing diabetes during your pregnancy. Between 5% and 10% of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes, usually around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. Typically, women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms. Most women are diagnosed after special blood tests Some women with gestational diabetes (about 30%) have larger than average babies. As a result, they are more likely to have intervention in labour such as a caesarean birth. But the baby will not be born with diabetes. Studies have suggested that women who develop gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Testing for gestational diabetes All women are screened for gestational diabetes at their 24 to 28 week routine check up. Women who are at higher risk may be tested more often. You are at higher risk of developing gestational diabetes if you: are overweight over the age of 25 years a family history of type 2 diabetes come from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander or some Asian backgrounds have had gestational diabetes before have had a large baby before. The tests available for gestational diabetes are: Glucose challenge test There is no fasting required and you are given a 50g glucose drink (equivalent to 10 teaspoons of sugar) with a blood test taken one hour after. This is a screening test only and if the result is above a certain level, you will be advised to have a gl Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Complications

Gestational Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Complications

MORE Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that develops, or is first diagnosed, during pregnancy. The condition, like other forms of diabetes, involves high blood sugar levels. Often times, gestational diabetes is a temporary disorder that occurs around the second trimester of pregnancy, and disappears after a woman gives birth. "Even if a woman had required quite a bit of therapy and treatment to keep her blood sugars under control when she was pregnant … usually the day after delivery, [her] sugars go back down to normal," said Dr. Christopher Glantz, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. But women who've had gestational diabetes should be monitored closely after birth, because they are more likely to develop diabetes later in life, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). A 2014 study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that between 4 and 9 percent of pregnant women in the United States develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs more frequently among certain ethic groups, including African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, Asians, and Pacific Islanders according to the March of Dimes. Symptoms Women with gestational diabetes usually have no symptoms or mild, non-life-threatening symptoms, according to the NIH. These symptoms are mostly related to abnormal blood sugar levels, and can include fatigue, excessive thirst and increased urination. Causes During pregnancy, changes happen in the mother's body to make sugar more available to the fetus, Glantz said. One of these changes is that the placenta produces hormones that interfere with the action of insulin, a hormone that helps sugar (or glucose) get from the bloodstream into cells. This means that sugar i Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes means diabetes that develops or is recognised for the first time during pregnancy. It affects between five and nine per cent of pregnancies. Diabetes develops when the body can't produce enough insulin (insulin deficiency), or produces a normal amount of insulin but the body’s tissue does not respond normally to the insulin (insulin resistance). Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, which regulates the amount of sugar available in the blood for energy, and enables any sugar that isn't immediately required to be stored. During pregnancy your body has to produce extra insulin to meet your baby's needs and your body becomes naturally more insulin resistant, especially from mid-pregnancy onwards. If your body can't produce enough insulin or develops too much insulin resistance, you will have too much sugar in your blood and may develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually resolves itself after your baby is born. However, if you have had gestational diabetes in one pregnancy, you are more likely to get it again in future pregnancies. You are also at a greater risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life and you will need to be regularly screened by your doctor throughout your life. You can reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by paying attention to what you eat and how much exercise you get. How will I know if I have gestational diabetes? You may be screened during the second trimester of your pregnancy for gestational diabetes. There is a range of different policies on who is tested for gestational diabetes and what test is given. You may want to ask your caregiver about their experience and preferences. If you are in a low risk group you will be offered a glucose challenge test (GCT) betwe Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is the inability to regulate blood sugar during pregnancy and affects around 30,000 pregnancies a year in the UK. It can develop if your body doesn't produce enough insulin and your blood sugar levels get too high during pregnancy. Read on for information on the signs to look out for, and to find out how the condition will be managed by your GP or midwife What causes diabetes in pregnancy? Insulin is the hormone that converts blood sugar into energy; when you're pregnant, you need more insulin to help incubate your growing baby and to counteract the insulin-resistant hormones produced by the placenta. If your body isn't able to produce enough insulin, there will be too much sugar in your bloodstream – this is known as gestational diabetes. It can potentially cause problems for you and your baby during and after birth, but the risk can be reduced if it's detected and well managed. Risk factors for gestational diabetes You are more likely to develop diabetes in pregnancy if you have any of these risk factors: Being overweight (with a BMI of 30 or more) Already having had a large baby (4.5kg or more) Previously having had gestational diabetes Family history of diabetes (a parent, sibling or child with diabetes) Family heritage with a high prevalence of diabetes (South Asian, Middle Eastern or black Caribbean descent) Gestational diabetes symptoms You may not have any symptoms – gestational diabetes is most commonly picked up by routine screening during pregnancy. However, in some cases, you might notice some or all of the following signs: Excessive thirst Weeing a lot Blurred vision Dry mouth If sugar is detected in your urine during a routine antenatal check, you'll probably be sent for an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). How the oral glucose t Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes | Diet And Symptoms

Gestational Diabetes | Diet And Symptoms

In my clinic, I'm seeing a growing number of cases of gestational diabetes. It's definitely on the increase, most likely due to our high carbohydrate diet and lack of proteins. Diabetes is a very common condition where there is too much glucose in the blood. Insulin (continuously produced in the pancreas) is the hormone responsible for lowering blood glucose levels. Insulin transports glucose from the blood stream into cells of the body for energy. Due to our poor diets these days, we are putting ourselves at increased risk of gestational diabetes. Not only that, but also type 2 diabetes, which can occur once you have had gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes usually has no obvious symptoms. If symptoms do occur, they can include: Unusual thirst Excessive urination Tiredness Thrush (yeast infections) Gestational Diabetes Risk Factors Below is a list of risk factors for gestational diabetes: Family history of type 2 diabetes. Having a first-degree relative with type 2 diabetes leads to lifetime risk of 40%. Similarly 25% to 33% of all type 2 diabetics have a family history of the condition Older than 40 years of age Excess body fat, particularly if you're ‘apple shaped' with a waist circumference greater than 88 cm Sedentary lifestyle with a diet high grains and refined carbohydrates Glucose intolerance, dyslipidaemia, hypertension History of gestational diabetes History of polycystic ovarian syndrome History of assisted reproduction (IVF, IUI, ICSI etc) Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, Pacific Islander, Indian or Chinese, African American, Hispanic American, and Native American descent Low birth weight and/or malnutrition in pregnancy may cause metabolic abnormalities in a foetus that later lead to diabetes Gestational Diabetes Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

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