diabetestalk.net

Symptoms Of Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a potentially blinding complication of diabetes that damages the eye's retina. It effects half of all Americans diagnosed with diabetes. However, only 6% of diabetics lose their vision. Blindness is largely preventable if patient and the medical team work together diligently. Prevention relies upon the proper use of medications, daily blood sugar testing, correct lifestyle habits, diet and supplementation. Complications related to sugar/glucose imbalances in the blood can result in damage to the retina which may not be noticeable at first, but the consequences can get worse with time severely threatening vision. Next: Nutrition, vitamins, diet, & lifestyle for diabetic retinopathy. Symptoms It is possible to have diabetic retinopathy for a long time before you realize it. In many cases, the symptoms of diabetic retinopathy are not apparent until the retina has been quite damaged and your sight has been compromised. Symptoms of diabetic retinopathy and its complications may include: Blurry or distorted vision Difficulty reading and other close work Increased number of eye floaters Partial or total vision loss or what feels like a permanent shadow cast across your field of vision Eye pain Causes of Diabetic Retinopathy The blood/ocular barrier layer of the retina is a compound structure in the eye that prevents large particles in large capillaries from entering the retina. The retinal pigmented layer is responsible for the outer layer of this barrier and diabetic retinopathy incidence is related to its breakdown. 11 Photoreceptor cell death/damage may play a central role in deterioration of microcapillaries in the eye that leads to diabetic retinpathy. Their deterioration is another hallmark of development of the condition.12 Researchers now report Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy: Know The Signs, Symptoms And Treatments

Diabetic Retinopathy: Know The Signs, Symptoms And Treatments

A disease that steals a person’s eyesight is one of the many potential complications of diabetes. Learn why eye care is crucial. Left unchecked, diabetes can affect almost every part of the body — from skin and bone to the heart, liver and nerves. A common and vulnerable target: the eyes. MORE FROM MICHIGAN: Sign up for our weekly newsletter About 30 to 40 percent of patients with diabetes in the United States experience diabetic retinopathy, which occurs when high blood sugar damages the tiny blood vessels of the retina. The severity is tied to the duration and management of a patient’s diabetes. Over time, advanced cases can lead to poor vision or even blindness. That’s why preventive self-care and regular eye exams are important, says Thomas Gardner, M.D., a professor of ophthalmology at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center. “Like most other diseases, success lies in early diagnosis and treatment,” says Gardner. “The prognosis for retaining good vision for people who keep their diabetes well controlled is much, much better than it used to be." Why diabetic retinopathy is dangerous Many people aren’t aware they have diabetic retinopathy until it has moved from early stages (nonproliferative retinopathy) to a point when leaking blood vessels break open and cause scar tissue that can pull on the retina (proliferative retinopathy). A delayed or lack of treatment “can make it very difficult to maintain vision,” Gardner says. Diabetic retinopathy symptoms The condition is often asymptomatic, especially in early cases. But as it progresses, effects are pronounced — including a lessened (or lost) ability to read or drive. Gardner says patients also may start “seeing blood floating around in their eyes” in the form of tiny black or red dots. Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Retinopathy

Symptoms Of Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetes prohibits the body from properly using and storing sugar, leaving excessive amounts of sugar in the bloodstream which can cause damage to blood vessels and various parts of the body- including the eyes and visual system. Diabetic retinopathy is when this condition results in progressive damage to the retina at the back of the eye. The retina is a light-sensitive tissue that is essential for vision, so if left untreated, diabetic retinopathy will eventually cause blindness. Sadly, despite the fact that proper monitoring and treatment can successfully halt the progression of the diabetic eye disease, it is still the leading cause of new cases of blindness in adults in North America. Diabetic retinopathy progressively damages the blood vessels of the retina to the point that they begin to leak blood and fluids. This leakage causes swelling in the retinal tissue which can impact your ability to focus causing vision loss and if left untreated, eventually will cause blindness. Retinopathy typically affects both eyes and often will have no symptoms in the early stages – making regular eye exams essential for anyone with diabetes. The longer an individual has had diabetes, the more likely it is that they will have some degree of retinopathy. Symptoms include: Blurred or cloudy vision Seeing floaters or spots Difficulty reading or seeing close objects Double Vision Poor Night Vision Untreated diabetic retinopathy can also lead to a detached retina. This can happen if the disease has progressed to proliferative retinopathy in which new, fragile blood vessels grow in the retina and the vitreous at the back of the eye. The blood vessels can break, leaking fluid and causing the growth of scar tissue which can cause the retina to detach. If left untreated this can cause bl Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Manifestations of diabetic retinopathy include microaneurysms, intraretinal hemorrhage, exudates, macular edema, macular ischemia, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, and traction retinal detachment. Symptoms may not develop until late in the disease. Diagnosis is by funduscopy; further details are elucidated by color fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. Treatment includes control of blood glucose and BP. Ocular treatments included retinal laser photocoagulation, intravitreal injection of antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs (eg, aflibercept, ranibizumab, bevacizumab), intraocular corticosteroids, vitrectomy, or a combination. Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of blindness, particularly among working-age adults. The degree of retinopathy is highly correlated with Pregnancy can impair blood glucose control and thus worsen retinopathy. Nonproliferative retinopathy Nonproliferative retinopathy (also called background retinopathy) develops first and causes increased capillary permeability, microaneurysms, hemorrhages, exudates, macular ischemia, and macular edema (thickening of the retina caused by fluid leakage from capillaries). Proliferative retinopathy Proliferative retinopathy develops after nonproliferative retinopathy and is more severe; it may lead to vitreous hemorrhage and traction retinal detachment. Proliferative retinopathy is characterized by abnormal new vessel formation (neovascularization), which occurs on the inner (vitreous) surface of the retina and may extend into the vitreous cavity and cause vitreous hemorrhage. Neovascularization is often accompanied by preretinal fibrous tissue, which, along with the vitreous, can contract, resulting in traction retinal detachment. Neovascularization may als Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Eye Disease

A A A Do I need to follow-up with my doctor after being diagnosed with diabetic eye disease? Diabetes is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide, and, in the United States, it is the most common cause of blindness in people younger than 65 years of age. Diabetic eye disease also encompasses a wide range of other eye problems, for example, Diabetes may cause a reversible, temporary blurring of the vision, or it can cause a severe, permanent loss of vision. Some people may not even realize they have had diabetes for several years until they begin to experience problems with their eyes or vision. Diabetes also may result in heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and circulatory abnormalities of the legs. The American Diabetes Association estimates that 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 8.1 million people additional people went undiagnosed. (This population is unaware that they have diabetes.) In the United States 1.2 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed every year. In the US in 2012, the total annual cost of diagnosed diabetes was 2.45 billion. Eighty-six million people in the US have prediabetes, and 9 out of every 10 don't know they have it. Of the 86 million people with prediabetes, without lifestyle changes 15% to 30% of them will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Lifestyle management has been shown to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and prediabetes by at least two-thirds. It can also slow or halt the progression of prediabetes to diabetes. People can try to avoid the problems associated with diabetes, including those that affect the eyes, by taking appropriate care of themselves by the following: Maintain a normal level of weight Watch your diet, especially limiting unhealthy types of fats and Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Introduction Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes, caused by high blood sugar levels damaging the back of the eye (retina). It can cause blindness if left undiagnosed and untreated. However, it usually takes several years for diabetic retinopathy to reach a stage where it could threaten your sight. To minimise the risk of this happening, people with diabetes should: ensure they control their blood sugar levels, blood pressure and cholesterol attend diabetic eye screening appointments – annual screening is offered to all people with diabetes aged 12 and over to pick up and treat any problems early on This page covers: Am I at risk of diabetic retinopathy? How diabetes can affect the eyes The retina is the light-sensitive layer of cells at the back of the eye that converts light into electrical signals. The signals are sent to the brain and the brain turns them into the images you see. The retina needs a constant supply of blood, which it receives through a network of tiny blood vessels. Over time, a persistently high blood sugar level can damage these blood vessels in three main stages: tiny bulges develop in the blood vessels, which may bleed slightly but don’t usually affect your vision – this is known as background retinopathy more severe and widespread changes affect the blood vessels, including more significant bleeding into the eye – this is known as pre-proliferative retinopathy scar tissue and new blood vessels, which are weak and bleed easily, develop on the retina – this is known as proliferative retinopathy and it can result in some loss of vision However, if a problem with your eyes is picked up early, lifestyle changes and/or treatment can stop it getting worse. Read about the stages of diabetic retinopathy Am I at risk of diabetic re Continue reading >>

Retinopathy

Retinopathy

The Facts Retinopathy refers to damage to the blood vessels of the retina. The retina, at the back of the eye, provides a window to the circulatory system. By examining it, a doctor can inspect a sample of the body's blood vessels and detect early signs of complications of diabetes or high blood pressure, as well as many other diseases (e.g., sickle cell disease, anemia, lupus). Retinopathy can also be seen in premature newborns. Some of the kinds of damage that your doctor may see in your retina are hypertensive retinopathy, a complication of high blood pressure (hypertension), and diabetic retinopathy, a complication of long-term diabetes. It's unusual for hypertension to impair vision, but hypertensive retinopathy can lead to blockage of retinal arteries or veins, which in turn may eventually result in the loss of vision. Smoking and diabetes increase the risk of developing hypertensive retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a deterioration of the blood vessels in the retina that usually affects both eyes. It is the leading cause of blindness in North America. Almost all people with diabetes show signs of retinal damage after about 20 years of living with the condition. Causes Retinopathy is usually a sign of another medical condition. Although several medical conditions (e.g., sickle cell disease, lupus) can cause retinopathy, the most common causes are diabetes and hypertension (high blood pressure). Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes. Diabetes causes high blood sugar levels, which can damage blood vessels. The damaged vessels around the retina can leak protein and fats, forming deposits that can interfere with vision. The damaged blood vessels are also not as effective at carrying oxygen to the retina, which can also cause damage. In the advanced sta Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a condition that occurs in people who have diabetes. It causes progressive damage to the retina, the light-sensitive lining at the back of the eye. Diabetic retinopathy is a serious sight-threatening complication of diabetes. Diabetes interferes with the body's ability to use and store sugar (glucose). The disease is characterized by too much sugar in the blood, which can cause damage throughout the body, including the eyes. Over time, diabetes damages the blood vessels in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy occurs when these tiny blood vessels leak blood and other fluids. This causes the retinal tissue to swell, resulting in cloudy or blurred vision. The condition usually affects both eyes. The longer a person has diabetes, the more likely they will develop diabetic retinopathy. If left untreated, diabetic retinopathy can cause blindness. Symptoms of diabetic retinopathy include: Seeing spots or floaters Blurred vision Having a dark or empty spot in the center of your vision Difficulty seeing well at night When people with diabetes experience long periods of high blood sugar, fluid can accumulate in the lens inside the eye that controls focusing. This changes the curvature of the lens, leading to blurred vision. However, once blood sugar levels are controlled, blurred distance vision will improve. Patients with diabetes who can better control their blood sugar levels will slow the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Often the early stages of diabetic retinopathy have no visual symptoms. That is why the American Optometric Association recommends that everyone with diabetes have a comprehensive dilated eye examination once a year. Early detection and treatment can limit the potential for significant vision loss from diabetic retinopathy. T Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

If you have diabetes, it is vital that you have your eyes checked regularly. Damage to the retina at the back of the eye (retinopathy) is a common complication of diabetes. If left untreated, it can become worse and cause some loss of vision, or total loss of vision (severe sight impairment) in severe cases. Good control of blood sugar (glucose) and blood pressure slows down the progression of retinopathy. Treatment with a laser, before the retinopathy becomes severe, can often prevent loss of vision. What is diabetic retinopathy? The term retinopathy covers various disorders of the retina, which can affect vision. Retinopathy is usually due to damage to the tiny blood vessels in the retina. Retinopathy is commonly caused by diabetes but is sometimes caused by other diseases such as very high blood pressure (hypertension). Note: people with diabetes also have a higher risk of developing other eye problems, including cataracts and glaucoma. How does diabetic retinopathy occur? Over several years, a high blood sugar (glucose) level can weaken and damage the tiny blood vessels in the retina. This can result in various problems which include: Small blow-out swellings of blood vessels (microaneurysms). Small leaks of fluid from damaged blood vessels (exudates). Small bleeds from damaged blood vessels (haemorrhages). Blood vessels may just become blocked. This can cut off the blood and oxygen supply to small sections of the retina. New abnormal blood vessels may grow from damaged blood vessels. This is called proliferative retinopathy. These new vessels are delicate and can bleed easily. The leaks of fluid, bleeds and blocked blood vessels may damage the cells of the retina. In some severe cases, damaged blood vessels bleed into the jelly-like centre of the eye (the vitreous Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

All people with diabetes are at risk of developing diabetic retinopathy. Vision loss or blindness may be preventable through early detection and timely treatment. Good control of diabetes, blood pressure and cholesterol as well as regular eye examinations may prevent vision loss. It is important to take action before you notice any eye problems. On this page: Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that damages blood vessels inside the retina at the back of the eye. Regular eye exams will reduce the risk of vision loss and blindness caused by diabetic retinopathy. Laser treatment is used successfully to treat retinopathy. All people with diabetes are at risk of developing diabetic retinopathy. Types of diabetic retinopathy There are three main types of diabetic retinopathy: Non-proliferative retinopathy is an early form of the disease, where the retinal blood vessels leak fluid or bleed. Macular oedema is a swelling of the macula, caused by the leakage of fluid from retinal blood vessels. It can damage central vision. Proliferative retinopathy is an advanced form of the disease and occurs when blood vessels in the retina disappear and are replaced by new fragile vessels that bleed easily, and that can result in a sudden loss of vision. Retinopathy is a high risk for diabetics It is important to understand your risk of diabetic retinopathy. Anyone with diabetes is at risk of developing retinopathy. People with diabetes (type 1 and type 2) are 25 times more likely to experience vision loss than people without diabetes. Without treatment, diabetic retinopathy can cause loss of vision and blindness. Unfortunately, only half of the people with diabetes have regular eye exams, and one-third have never been checked. Symptoms There are no early-stage symptoms of diab Continue reading >>

12 Natural Tips For Diabetic Retinopathy Prevention & Management

12 Natural Tips For Diabetic Retinopathy Prevention & Management

by Katherine Brind’Amour, PhD Diabetic retinopathy is an eye disease that can affect people with any form of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 or gestational diabetes. The condition is caused when blood sugar and blood pressure in the tiny blood vessels in the eye “spring a leak” and release blood into the eye. This leads to blurry vision, seeing floaters or even complete vision loss in severe cases. The tricky thing about diabetic retinopathy is that not everyone has symptoms right away. Many people may have some damage from this condition without realizing the cause, and still others may attribute the vision problem to something else, such as getting older. As many as 45 percent of the 29 million Americans with diabetes have some degree of diabetic retinopathy, and half of them may not even know it. (1, 2) The good news is that people with diabetes can prevent or delay diabetic retinopathy through a variety of natural approaches. And if the disease does begin, there are natural ways to manage the condition and keep it from getting worse. The bad news? It requires long-term effort, since vision loss from diabetic retinopathy is a lifelong risk for people with diabetes. What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? To define diabetic retinopathy, you first have to understand diabetes. Diabetes is a disease in which the body has difficulty making or using sugar (glucose). This leads to periods of high or low blood sugar, which can make it hard for the rest of the body to function at times. In diabetic retinopathy, high blood sugar starts to damage the tiny blood vessels in the retina, which is part of the eye. The blood vessels may close or swell and leak. (3) The eye may also start to grow new blood vessels. These changes in blood vessel health eventually cause changes in vision. (4) Ther Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Tweet Diabetic retinopathy is the most common form of diabetic eye disease. Diabetic retinopathy usually only affects people who have had diabetes (diagnosed or undiagnosed) for a significant number of years. Retinopathy can affect all diabetics and becomes particularly dangerous, increasing the risk of blindness, if it is left untreated. The risk of developing diabetic retinopathy is known to increase with age as well with less well controlled blood sugar and blood pressure level. According to the NHS, 1,280 new cases of blindness caused by diabetic retinopathy are reported each year in England alone, while a further 4,200 people in the country are thought to be at risk of retinopathy-related vision loss. All people with diabetes should have a dilated eye examination at least once every year to check for diabetic retinopathy. What is diabetic retinopathy? Diabetic retinopathy occurs when changes in blood glucose levels cause changes in retinal blood vessels. In some cases, these vessels will swell up (macular oedema) and leak fluid into the rear of the eye. In other cases, abnormal blood vessels will grow on the surface of the retina. Unless treated, diabetic retinopathy can gradually become more serious and progress from ‘background retinopathy’ to seriously affecting vision and can lead to blindness. Diabetic retinopathy includes 3 different types: What are the symptoms of diabetic retinopathy? Like many conditions of this nature, the early stages of diabetic retinopathy may occur without symptoms and without pain. An actual influence on the vision will not occur until the disease advances. Macular oedema can result from maculopathy and affect vision occurs if leaking fluid causes the macular to swell. New vessels on the retina can prompt bleeding, which can also Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

In its advanced stages, diabetes may lead to new blood vessel growth over the retina. The new blood vessels can break and cause scar tissue to develop, which can pull the retina away from the back of the eye. This is known as retinal detachment, and it can lead to blindness if untreated. In addition, abnormal blood vessels can grow on the iris, which can lead to glaucoma. People with diabetes are 25 times more likely to lose vision than those who are not diabetic, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Signs and symptoms of diabetic retinopathy Anyone who has diabetes is at risk for developing diabetic retinopathy, but not all diabetics will be affected. In the early stages of diabetes, you may not notice any change in your vision. But by the time you notice vision changes from diabetes, your eyes may already be irreparably damaged by the disease. That's why routine eye exams are so important. Your eye doctor can detect signs of diabetes in your eyes even before you notice any visual symptoms, and early detection and treatment can prevent vision loss. Floaters are one symptom of diabetic retinopathy. Sometimes, difficulty reading or doing close work can indicate that fluid is collecting in the macula, the most light-sensitive part of the retina. This fluid build-up is called macular edema. Another symptom is double vision, which occurs when the nerves controlling the eye muscles are affected. If you experience any of these symptoms, see your eye doctor immediately. If you are diabetic, you should see your eye doctor at least once a year for a dilated eye exam, even if you have no visual symptoms. If your eye doctor suspects diabetic retinopathy, a special test called fluorescein angiography may be performed. In this test, dye is injected into the body and t Continue reading >>

Eye Problems And Diabetes

Eye Problems And Diabetes

Eye problems and diabetes introduction If you have diabetes, regular visits to your ophthalmologist for eye exams are important to avoid eye problems. High blood sugar (glucose) increases the risk of diabetes eye problems. In fact, diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in adults age 20 to 74. If you have eye problems and diabetes, don't buy a new pair of glasses as soon as you notice you have blurred vision. It could just be a temporary eye problem that develops rapidly with diabetes and is caused by high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar in diabetes causes the lens of the eye to swell, which changes your ability to see. To correct this kind of eye problem, you need to get your blood sugar back into the target range (90-130 milligrams per deciliter or mg/dL before meals, and less than 180 mg/dL one to two hours after a meal). It may take as long as three months after your blood sugar is well controlled for your vision to fully get back to normal. Blurred vision can also be a symptom of more serious eye problem with diabetes. The three major eye problems that people with diabetes may develop and should be aware of are cataracts, glaucoma, and retinopathy. A cataract is a clouding or fogging of the normally clear lens of the eye. The lens is what allows us to see and focus on an image just like a camera. Although anyone can get cataracts, people with diabetes get these eye problems at an earlier age than most and the condition progresses more rapidly than in people without diabetes. If you have a cataract, there is a cloudy area in the lens of your eye that results in the inability to focus light, and your vision is impaired. Symptoms of this eye problem in diabetes include blurred or glared vision. During cataract surgery, the cloudy lens is removed or cleaned ou Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes?

What Causes Diabetes?

Little Known Factors That Lead To Diabetes What are some of the lifestyle, genetics and other not-so-obvious factors that can trigger diabetes? What can you do to prevent this condition? Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. It affects over 29.1 million people in the U.S. – 9.3 percent of the population in the U.S. Another 86 million Americans have prediabetes and aren’t even aware of it. The cause of diabetes is the absence or insufficient production of the hormone insulin, which lowers blood sugar in the body. Two types of diabetes There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2, which are also known as insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is less common: it affects only 1 in 250 Americans and only occurs in individuals younger than age 20. It has no known cure. A majority of type 2 diabetes cases can be prevented or cured. Signs and symptoms Among the symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased urine Excessive thirst Weight loss Hunger Fatigue Skin problems Slow-healing wounds Yeast infections Tingling or numbness in feet or toes Various factors Research has proven that there are certain lifestyle and genetic factors that lead to diabetes. Among them are: Leading a non-active lifestyle A family history of diabetes High blood pressure (hypertension) Low levels of the good cholesterol (HDL) Elevated levels of triglycerides (a type of fat) in the blood Increasing age Polycystic ovary syndrome Impaired glucose tolerance Insulin resistance Gestational diabetes during a pregnancy Some ethnic backgrounds (African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans and Alaska natives) are at greater risk of diabetes. Get t Continue reading >>

More in diabetes