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Symptoms Of Diabetes In Men

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

According to the latest American Heart Association's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics, about 8 million people 18 years and older in the United States have type 2 diabetes and do not know it. Often type 1 diabetes remains undiagnosed until symptoms become severe and hospitalization is required. Left untreated, diabetes can cause a number of health complications. That's why it's so important to both know what warning signs to look for and to see a health care provider regularly for routine wellness screenings. Symptoms In incidences of prediabetes, there are no symptoms. People may not be aware that they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes because they have no symptoms or because the symptoms are so mild that they go unnoticed for quite some time. However, some individuals do experience warning signs, so it's important to be familiar with them. Prediabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes No symptoms Increased or extreme thirst Increased thirst Increased appetite Increased appetite Increased fatigue Fatigue Increased or frequent urination Increased urination, especially at night Unusual weight loss Weight loss Blurred vision Blurred vision Fruity odor or breath Sores that do not heal In some cases, no symptoms In some cases, no symptoms If you have any of these symptoms, see your health care provider right away. Diabetes can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. Who should be tested for prediabetes and diabetes? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are: If your blood glucose levels are in normal range, testing should be done about every three years. If you have prediabetes, you should be checked for diabetes every one to two years after diagnosis. Tests for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes There are three ty Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (long-term) condition that occurs when your body doesn’t make enough insulin, or when your body has trouble using the insulin that it does make. About 1 in 400 young people have this condition. What is insulin? Why is it important? Insulin is a hormone made by a gland called the pancreas. The pancreas is located behind the stomach. Whenever you eat food, your body digests the food (breaks it down) into smaller parts: vitamins, minerals, sugar (called “glucose”), fat, and protein. Your body then uses glucose for energy. Glucose is the body’s major source of energy. Insulin is the hormone that helps glucose enter the cells of your body so it can be used as energy. If your body doesn’t make enough insulin, or if your body has difficulty using the insulin that it makes, the glucose from your food does not get changed into energy. Instead, the glucose stays in your blood, causing your blood glucose (also called “blood sugar”) to rise. Why is high blood sugar a problem? High blood sugar is a problem because it can cause serious damage to the body. Some of the most serious, long term problems are loss of vision, kidney problems, heart problems, damage to circulation and stroke. This kind of damage happens slowly over many years and can be delayed or prevented if you take good care of your diabetes. There are also short-term problems that come from high blood sugar. Some common short term-problems (caused from high blood sugar) are: Being thirsty Having to urinate (pee) more often Feeling irritable or exhausted Weight loss If your blood sugar gets too high due to not having enough insulin, you can experience a very serious condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. Signs of ketoacidosis are: Rapid deep breathing Stomach pain or chest pain and/or Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms In Men

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms In Men

In general, the signs of diabetes in men are almost identical to the symptoms experienced in women. But what exactly is type 1 diabetes? It’s a serious autoimmune disease in which your pancreas stops producing insulin—a hormone that draws energy from food. It affects people of all ages regardless of diet or lifestyle. Type 1 diabetes is not preventable and there is currently no cure. Symptoms of diabetes in men: What to look for Warning signs of type 1 diabetes tend to come on suddenly—and may be mistaken for illness. One of the early symptoms that you may be familiar with is more frequent urination. This occurs when the kidneys are trying to rid your body of excess blood sugar. And it’s often accompanied by extreme thirst, which is the result of dehydration. You may also experience: Increased appetite: If your body isn’t able to get the proper energy it needs from food you may find yourself feeling more hungry than normal. Unexpected weight loss: If you’re losing weight—especially when eating more—it could be a sign that your body isn’t getting enough calories from the food you eat. Other diabetes symptoms in men What other warning signs should you be aware of? Look for sudden vision changes; feeling drowsy or lethargic; experiencing heavy or labored breathing; and falling into a stupor or unconsciousness. Type 1 diabetes can be life-threatening if it goes untreated. And the earlier you catch it the better, so please see your doctor if you think you are experiencing symptoms. Your support is more critical than ever Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Men

Diabetes Symptoms In Men

Diabetes symptoms in men can mirror diabetes symptoms in women, but there are some differences, as we discuss here. It helps to first understand what diabetes is: a condition characterized by elevated blood glucose levels, which can lead to a number of serious complications. In people without diabetes, the pancreas produces the hormone insulin, which acts on the body’s cells, moving “sugar,” or glucose, from the blood into the cells, where it can be used for energy. In type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system attacks and destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce the hormone insulin resulting in an insulin deficiency and therefore elevated blood glucose levels. In type 2 diabetes, the cells of the body become resistant to the effects of insulin and the pancreas cannot produce enough extra insulin to compensate for this resistance, resulting in high blood glucose levels. Download this expert FREE guide, Diabetes Symptoms and Treatments: How to lower blood sugar with a diabetic diet, medications, and lifestyle changes. This new report tells you how you can take command of your diabetes, simplify blood sugar management, and make the most of today’s breakthroughs in treatment. According to the American Diabetes Association, studies have demonstrated that men are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes symptoms than women, although the reasons for this are unclear. Men share many of the same risk factors for diabetes as women, including family history, the presence of autoantibodies, living in a colder climate, and possibly exposure to certain viral illnesses for type 1 diabetes and obesity or excess weight, older age, family history, race, sedentary lifestyle, high blood pressure, and abnormal cholesterol levels. In addition, some researchers believe that dia Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Men: 4 Different Signs

Diabetes Symptoms In Men: 4 Different Signs

What is diabetes? What are the types of diabetes? Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that occurs when your blood sugar (glucose), is too high (hyperglycemia). Glucose is what the body uses for energy, and the pancreas produces a hormone called insulin that helps convert the glucose from the food you eat into energy. When the body either does not produce enough insulin, does not produce any at all, or your body becomes resistant to the insulin, the glucose does not reach your cells to be used for energy. This results in the health condition termed diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, because it usually is diagnosed during childhood. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the body does not produce insulin because the body’s immune system attacks insulin-producing cells from the pancreas called beta cells. Type 1 diabetes is treated by using insulin. Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This occurs when blood sugar levels get too high over time, and the cells become insensitive or resistant to insulin (termed insulin resistance). There are multiple medications used to treat type 2 diabetes. What warning signs and symptoms of diabetes are unique to men? Signs and symptoms of diabetes unique to men include: What warning signs and symptoms of diabetes are the same in men and women? There are diabetes warning signs and symptoms that both women and men have in common, for example: Excessive thirst and hunger Irritability Slow-healing wounds Skin infections Breath odor that is fruity, sweet, or an acetone odor Diabetes Diet: Healthy Meal Plans for Diabetes-Friendly Eating How does diabetes affect men differently than wom Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Diabetes?

What Are The Symptoms Of Diabetes?

What Are the Symptoms of Diabetes? For both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, symptoms of diabetes can be either acute (occurring immediately) or chronic (occurring slowly over time). Acute T1DM is more likely to present with acute onset symptoms requiring hospitalization. However both T1DM and T2DM can present acutely and have similar symptoms, including 1 or more of the following:1 Increased Thirst Increased Frequency of Urination Increased Hunger Weakness/Fatigue Nausea/Vomiting/Abdominal Pain Blurred Vision Any of the preceding symptoms are concerning for dangerously uncontrolled hyperglycemia and emergent medical treatment should be sought immediately! Chronic The long-term, slowly developing symptoms diabetes (both T1DM and T2DM) are similar and may include 1 or more of the following: Decreased Vision Decreased Blood Flow/Decreased Kidney Function Increased Risk of Infection Decreased Sensation and/or Pain in Extremities Decreased Wound Healing EMG Health Homepage: Men’s Health Introduction Continue reading >>

4 Subtle Signs You’re Developing Diabetes

4 Subtle Signs You’re Developing Diabetes

Diabetes can sneak up on you. That’s what reportedly happened to Rob Kardashian, the 28-year-old reality TV personality, this week. According to TMZ, he was rushed to an L.A. hospital and diagnosed with the condition. Rob had put on weight recently, but he no idea he had diabetes. And he’s not alone: 25 percent of people with diabetes don’t know they’re afflicted, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Paying attention to prediabetes warning signs could save you from an ER visit like Kardashian’s—and prevent you from ever developing full-blown diabetes. Here are the top silent alarms. (If these sound familiar, exercising and losing weight can reduce your risk. Try The Get Back in Shape Workout: A 28-Day Program That Will Transform Your Body!) 1. You know what the bathroom looks like at night. Because you visit often. As blood sugar levels go up, diabetes symptoms like frequent urination worsen. “If 4 months ago you were getting up once in the middle of the night to pee and now you’re getting up three times, that’s a clue you need to get checked out,” says Andrew Bremer, M.D., Ph.D., program director at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. This may also be a symptom of prostate issues (such as an enlarged prostate). Either way, it’s best to bring the issue up with your doctor so he can rule out potential causes. 2. Your skin looks dirty. You notice dark patches of skin on the back of your neck, but no matter how hard you rub, they won’t come off. How come? Insulin resistance can cause a condition called acanthosis nigricans, which may appear during pre-diabetes. The dark, velvety patches can ring your neck and also appear on your elbows and knees. Once you get your glucose under control, the p Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Men

Diabetes Symptoms In Men

Tweet The symptoms of diabetes in men and women are generally similar but there are certain symptoms which are either unique to males or may be more noticeable in men. If you are experiencing symptoms of diabetes, the NHS advises that you see a GP as soon as possible as early treatment of diabetes can prevent health complications developing. Symptoms of diabetes specific to men There are several symptoms of diabetes that are specific to males, including: The general symptoms of diabetes are: Reduced strength and loss of muscle mass Unexplained loss of muscle mass may be a sign of high sugar levels and diabetes. If blood sugar levels remain at high levels for relatively long periods during the day, the body will start to break down fat and muscle for energy. The resulting weight loss is usually most noticeable in people with type 1 diabetes. However, it can also affect people with type 2 diabetes that has gone undiagnosed for a long period of time. Recurrent genital thrush Genital thrush is a yeast infection that can occur if blood sugar levels are high, causing sugar to be passed out via the urine. Symptoms of genital thrush include: Redness on or around the head of the penis Swelling on or around the head of the penis Itching on or around the head of the penis Unpleasant odour A white curd-like appearance on the skin Soreness during sex Erectile dysfunction Charity Diabetes UK states that erectile dysfunction may be an indicator of undiagnosed diabetes. Erectile difficulties can be caused by high blood sugar levels over a long period of time causing difficulties either with blood supply to the penis or from damage to nerves in the penis. Erectile dysfunction is defined as the inability to either achieve or maintain an erection sufficiently well to satisfy sexual activi Continue reading >>

Recognizing Diabetes Symptoms In Men

Recognizing Diabetes Symptoms In Men

Diabetes is a disease in which your body cannot produce enough insulin, cannot use insulin, or a mix of both. In diabetes, sugar levels in the blood go up. This can cause complications if left uncontrolled. The potential health consequences are often serious. Diabetes raises the risk of cardiovascular disease and can cause problems with your eyes, skin, kidneys, and nervous system. Diabetes can also cause erectile dysfunction (ED) and other urological problems in men. Fortunately, many of these complications are preventable or treatable with awareness and attention to your health. Diabetes Symptoms Early symptoms of diabetes are often undetected because they may not seem that serious. Some of the mildest early diabetes symptoms include: frequent urination unusual fatigue blurred vision weight loss, even without dieting tingling or numbness in hands and feet If you allow diabetes to go untreated in these early stages, complications can occur. These complications include issues with your skin, eyes, and nerves (including nerve damage, or neuropathy). Watch out for bacterial infections in your eyelids (styes), hair follicles (folliculitis), or fingernails or toenails. Additionally, make note of any stabbing/shooting pains in your hands and feet. All of these are signals that you may be experiencing complications from diabetes. Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is the inability to achieve or maintain an erection. It can be a symptom of many health issues, including high blood pressure, stress, smoking, medication, kidney disease, and circulatory or nervous system conditions. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, men with diabetes are at risk for ED. The organization states that 20 to 75 percent of men with diabetes have erectile dysfunction. Continue reading >>

Testosterone’s Overlooked Role In The Treatment Of Diabetes In Men

Testosterone’s Overlooked Role In The Treatment Of Diabetes In Men

For most of my 60 years, I’ve dreamed of finding a medical treatment or cure that could improve humankind. It has been my mission and lifetime quest. Fifteen years ago, I rediscovered the reparative properties of bioidentical testosterone. It not only reversed my slide into old age, but also reversed my male patients’ diabetes. A hospital-supervised study soon followed, showing that testosterone replacement for men with diabetes was more important than oral diabetic medications, and for some, more important than insulin. What I could not imagine then was that almost every diabetes specialist, my affiliated national hospital chain, and the state-supervised health insurance carrier would brand me an “enemy of the state” and move to destroy my medical practice and credibility. The American Medical Association provided no support. This is the story of the inexpensive hormone that can displace up to $20 billion in direct pharmaceutical sales yearly—if only the truth becomes known. Historical Perspective In the First World War, an unsubstantiated report alleged that a dead soldier’s testicles were transplanted into the abdominal wall of a man with gangrene. The story goes that the man recovered and did not require amputation. This story might have been considered whimsical, were it not for the work of the Danish physician Jens Moller, MD, between 1950 and 1984.1 Dr. Moller and approximately 250 other European doctors used injections of bioidentical testosterone to treat diabetes, gangrene, and related heart disease in more than 10,000 male and female patients. Dr. Moller’s enthusiasm overshadowed the observation that the high testosterone dosages used increased the incidence of heart disease in the women who were treated. This led to his public humiliation, a di Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes In Men

Symptoms Of Diabetes In Men

Diabetes is sometimes able to develop because the symptoms are ignored. The American Diabetes Association says that there are new studies to indicate that early detection of diabetes can help improve a man's chances of avoiding the results, which can include blindness, amputation and possibly death. It is important to report any symptoms to a doctor as soon as possible. Identification Diabetes prevents the body from regulating the amount of glucose that enters the bloodstream. Insulin is the hormone that is used by the body to make sure that the glucose, or sugar, in the body is properly distributed. An overabundance of glucose in the blood can result in dangerously low energy levels in the body's cells, which can lead to damage of internal organs such as the heart, eyes and kidneys. Effects Too much sugar in the bloodstream can result in a variety of conditions, including heart disease and stroke, loss of vision, kidney problems that can lead to urinary infections and a yellowing of the skin referred to as jaundice, permanent nerve damage and limb amputation. Men may also experience sexual conditions such as erectile dysfunction. Potential The symptoms of diabetes in men can sometimes seem harmless at first. Some of these early symptoms include a frequent urge to urinate, excessive hunger or thirst, an unexplained weight loss and a feeling of fatigue or drowsiness. As the condition progresses, men may also notice that they become easily irritated, they have a constant anxious feeling and they experience temporary vision problems such as blurred vision or double vision. Considerations Some of the symptoms associated with diabetes can occur with more severity in men. The vision problems could progress to a condition of total blindness. Men are also more inclined to feeli Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems

Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems

Troublesome bladder symptoms and changes in sexual function are common health problems as people age. Having diabetes can mean early onset and increased severity of these problems. Sexual and urologic complications of diabetes occur because of the damage diabetes can cause to blood vessels and nerves. Men may have difficulty with erections or ejaculation. Women may have problems with sexual response and vaginal lubrication. Urinary tract infections and bladder problems occur more often in people with diabetes. People who keep their diabetes under control can lower their risk of the early onset of these sexual and urologic problems. Diabetes and Sexual Problems Both men and women with diabetes can develop sexual problems because of damage to nerves and small blood vessels. When a person wants to lift an arm or take a step, the brain sends nerve signals to the appropriate muscles. Nerve signals also control internal organs like the heart and bladder, but people do not have the same kind of conscious control over them as they do over their arms and legs. The nerves that control internal organs are called autonomic nerves, which signal the body to digest food and circulate blood without a person having to think about it. The body's response to sexual stimuli is also involuntary, governed by autonomic nerve signals that increase blood flow to the genitals and cause smooth muscle tissue to relax. Damage to these autonomic nerves can hinder normal function. Reduced blood flow resulting from damage to blood vessels can also contribute to sexual dysfunction. What sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The condition includes the total inability to h Continue reading >>

10 Symptoms That Could Indicate Type 2 Diabetes (photos)

10 Symptoms That Could Indicate Type 2 Diabetes (photos)

Diabetes affects 24 million people in the U.S., but only 18 million know they have it. About 90 percent of those people have type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, rising blood sugar acts like a poison. Diabetes is often called the silent killer because of its easy-to-miss symptoms. “Almost every day people come into my office with diabetes who don’t know it,” says Maria Collazo-Clavell, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The best way to pick up on it is to have a blood sugar test. But if you have these symptoms, it could be wise to contact your doctor. Continue reading >>

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