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Symptoms Of Diabetes In Children With Autism

“my Son Has Juvenile Diabetes And Autism.” A Mother’s Interview

“my Son Has Juvenile Diabetes And Autism.” A Mother’s Interview

The following interview is with Ammey, a mother whose children have multiple medical and cognitive conditions. Of particular interest to me is her situation with her oldest son, Khy, who has both juvenile diabetes and autism. Ammey responded to my blog, Do You Have BOTH Juvenile Diabetes and Autism in Your Family? Here is her story. 1. Tell us a little about your family. My name is Ammey, and I’ve been married for thirteen years to my husband Mikel. We have three children: Our son Khy is 14, Kaine is 11, and Lilli is four. Khy has autism, asthma, type 1 diabetes, VUR, and chronic migraines. Our son Kaine has pervasive development disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD NOS) and narcolepsy. Lilli has asthma and whole body eczema. We laugh a lot in our house. Sometimes the literal interpretation of our boys’ comments creates very amusing jokes. The boys are phenomenal artists, and they draw all the time. Our home has a lot of pencils, paper, and erasers lying around. 2. Which diagnosis did your son receive first, and how old was he? What were the symptoms you observed? How did you handle the diagnosis? Khy was diagnosed with autism first, at the age of 8. He had very poor eye contact, repetitive behaviors like finger flicking, complex spinning, very narrow interests and echolalia. He was reading and drawing constantly by the age of 3. We were originally told he had Aspergers, and then they said it was autism. I felt speechless and frustrated. I missed the autism signs all those years, and so I blamed myself at first because he did not receive any early intervention. I dealt with my frustration by insisting he start whatever therapy he could at his age and worked hard with him on his deficits, focusing on his strengths. He became a regional center client and we were able Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Autism?

What Are The Symptoms Of Autism?

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can look different in different people. It’s a developmental disability that affects the way people communicate, behave, or interact with others. There’s no single cause for it, and symptoms can be very mild or very severe. Some children who are on the spectrum start showing signs as young as a few months old. Others seem to have normal development for the first few months or years of their lives and then they start showing symptoms. But up to half of parents of children with ASD noticed issues by the time their child reached 12 months, and between 80% and 90% noticed problems by 2 years. Children with ASD will have symptoms throughout their lives, but it’s possible for them to get better as they get older. The autism spectrum is very wide. Some people might have very noticeable issues, others might not. The common thread is differences in social skills, communication, and behavior compared with people who aren’t on the spectrum. Social Skills A child with ASD has a hard time interacting with others. Problems with social skills are some of the most common signs. He might want to have close relationships but not know how. If your child is on the spectrum, he might show some social symptoms by the time he’s 8 to 10 months old. These may include any of the following: He can’t respond to his name by his first birthday. Playing, sharing, or talking with other people doesn’t interest him. He prefers to be alone. He avoids or rejects physical contact. When he’s upset, he doesn’t like to be comforted. He doesn’t understand emotions -- his own or others’. Communication About 40% of kids with autism spectrum disorders don’t talk at all, and between 25% and 30% develop some language skills during infancy but then lose them lat Continue reading >>

About Autism

About Autism

3. What are some effective treatments for Autism? 4. What do the all these acronyms mean – IEP? ABA? FAPE? 5. My child just received a diagnosis of Autism, what do I do next? 6. Whom should I contact in Washington State to mediate disputes with my school district regarding my child’s IEP? 7. Where can I find comprehensive information about the IEP process? What is Autism? Autism is a general term used to describe a group of complex Neurodevelopmental disorders known as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The other ASD’s are PDD-NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified) and Asperger’s Syndrome. Today, it is estimated that 1 in every 88 children is diagnosed with autism, making it more common than childhood cancer, juvenile diabetes and pediatric AIDS combined. Unable to learn naturally from the environment as most children do, the child with autism shows little interest in the world or people around him/her. While all children with autism develop some normal and even advanced skills, they exhibit a wide range of behavioral deficiencies and excesses. What are some of the symptoms of Autism? 1. Disturbances in the rate of appearance of social, language/communication and motor skills 2. Atypical responses to sensations, such as sight, hearing, touch, balance, smell, taste, reaction to pain and the way a child holds his or her body 3. Absent or delayed speech and language, although specific thinking capabilities may be present 4. Atypical way of relating to people, objects or events Autism occurs in children from all racial, geographical and socioeconomic backgrounds. Disproportionately affecting males, it is four times more prevalent in boys than girls. What are some effective treatments for Autism? Though there is no cure yet for autism, there Continue reading >>

The Simple Test Which May Help Prevent Autism

The Simple Test Which May Help Prevent Autism

A new hypothesis states that impaired glucose tolerance and hyperinsulinemia may be a common underlying mechanism of type 2 diabetes and autism Emerging research also suggests strong links between gut flora and both diabetes and brain disorders such as autism. The primary key to maintaining both healthy gut flora and optimal insulin levels is a low-fructose, low-carb diet, high in nutrient-dense whole foods Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) is the result of poorly developed or imbalanced gut flora, which can have a disastrous effect on mental health and brain development and function. Interestingly, children who do not develop normal gut flora from birth also appear to be particularly prone to vaccine damage, and this knowledge may be a MAJOR key for reducing vaccine injuries, including autism GAPS can be easily identified within the first weeks of your baby's life by analyzing his stool to determine the state of his gut flora, and a urine test to check for metabolites. These tests will provide a picture of the state of your child's immune system. If your child has abnormal gut flora, he will be more prone to vaccine damage, so avoiding inoculations until the metabolic characteristics of GAPS have been reversed is highly recommended By Dr. Mercola A review of genetic and biochemical abnormalities has revealed a possible link between autism and type 2 diabetes. It's still only a hypothesis, but according to Rice University biochemist Michael Stern, author of the opinion paper, these two conditions may have a common underlying mechanism: impaired glucose tolerance and hyperinsulinemia. Hyperinsulinemia, a common precursor to insulin resistance, is characterized by excess levels of insulin in your bloodstream. Insulin resistance, in turn, is associated with type 2 diabete Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus In Children

Diabetes Insipidus In Children

What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is a condition that results from insufficient production of the antidiuretic hormone (ADH), or vasopressin, a hormone that helps the kidneys and body conserve the correct amount of water. Normally, ADH controls the kidneys' output of urine. It is secreted by the hypothalamus (a small gland located at the base of the brain), stored in the pituitary gland, and then released into the bloodstream. ADH is secreted to decrease the amount of urine output so that dehydration does not occur. Diabetes insipidus, however, causes excessive production of very diluted urine and excessive thirst. The disease is categorized into groups: Central diabetes insipidus. An insufficient production or secretion of ADH; can be a result of damage to the hypothalamus or pituitary gland caused by head injuries, genetic disorders, and other diseases. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. A lack of kidney response to normal levels of ADH can be caused by drugs or chronic disorders, such as kidney failure, sickle cell disease, or polycystic kidney disease. It can also be genetic. What causes diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus can be caused by several conditions, including the following: Malfunctioning hypothalamus (that produces too little ADH) Malfunctioning pituitary gland (that fails to release ADH into the bloodstream) Damage to hypothalamus or pituitary gland during surgery Brain injury Tumor Tuberculosis Blockage in the arteries leading to the brain Encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) Meningitis (inflammation of the meninges, the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord) Sarcoidosis (a rare inflammation of the lymph nodes and other tissues throughout the body) Family heredity Certain drugs like lithium What are the symptoms of diabetes ins Continue reading >>

Autism May Share Risk Factors With Diabetes

Autism May Share Risk Factors With Diabetes

Teenagers and young adults with autism are about three times more likely than those without the condition to develop type 2 diabetes, according to one of the largest studies of autism and diabetes to date1. The findings, published in March in Diabetes Care, add to mounting evidence that people with autism face a long list of chronic health problems. Type 2 diabetes, which often goes hand-in-hand with obesity — associated with a subset of autism cases — can lead to heart disease and stroke, as well as nerve and kidney damage. “We really need effective interventions for these adolescents and young adults to turn the tide and hopefully prevent the development of type 2 diabetes,” says Meredith Dreyer Gillette, associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, who was not involved in the study. About 32 percent of young children with autism are overweight and 16 percent are obese, compared with 23 percent and 10 percent of typically developing children, respectively2. Certain genetic risk factors for autism, such as deletions on chromosome 16, are also tied to weight problems. Women who are obese or have diabetes while pregnant are more likely to have children with autism. The prevalence of diabetes among individuals with autism, however, has been less clear. A study last year found an increased risk of diabetes — as well as many other chronic health problems — among adults with autism, possibly stemming from a lack of access to preventive care3. Diabetes data: To probe this link more deeply, a team of researchers in Taiwan identified 6,122 adolescents and young adults with autism and more than 24,000 controls with no history of diabetes in the country’s National Health Insurance Research Database. The researchers could not be reache Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Type 1 diabetes tends to start when people are under 25, although it can be diagnosed later in life. With Type 1 diabetes (also called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. When glucose can't enter the cells, it builds up in the blood and the body's cells literally starve to death. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections and regularly monitor their blood glucose levels. The cause of Type 1 diabetes is unknown but it is thought to be an autoimmune disease, where the body's immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Not all diabetes in children and teenagers is the kind called Type 1. Type 2 diabetes is being seen increasingly in young people. Where Type 1 diabetes always requires insulin, Type 2 can require insulin but often it can be treated with other medicines such as tablets. This section deals only with young people who have Type 1 diabetes. We have talked to a range of young people who've lived with Type 1 diabetes from those who were very young when they were first diagnosed to those who were diagnosed when they were teenagers. We have also talked to some young people only recently diagnosed. In this section young people talk about the signs and symptoms that prompted them to seek medical help. Signs of diabetes Most people remembered that the first symptoms of diabetes had crept up on them over weeks or even months- most had felt thirsty all the time and said that they started to drink more and more and found that they were unable to quench their thirst. Lots of people described realising something must be wrong wi Continue reading >>

Type-1 Diabetes

Type-1 Diabetes

In type-1 diabetes, the body can’t make a hormone called insulin, which normally lets sugar into the body’s cells. This results in high blood sugar and symptoms like tiredness, thirst and frequent urination. If your child has type-1 diabetes symptoms, your child needs to see a doctor. About type-1 diabetes Type-1 diabetes happens when cells in the pancreas stop making the hormone insulin. Insulin is like a key that unlocks the cells of the body so that glucose – the simplest form of sugar – can get in. Glucose is the ‘fuel’ that gives the body energy. When a child’s body stops making insulin to unlock cells and glucose can’t get into them, a few things start happening. The body isn’t making the energy it needs, so a child with diabetes gets very tired. Also, glucose builds up in the child’s blood. This is the high blood sugar that most people think of when they hear about diabetes. When there’s high sugar in the blood, the kidneys try to flush it out in urine. This is why you find high sugar in the urine of a child with diabetes. And because the body is making lots of urine to try to get rid of the sugar, it’s also using and losing lots of water. This can lead to dehydration. Type-1 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes in children. It used to be known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile onset diabetes. Causes of type-1 diabetes We don’t know what causes type-1 diabetes. We do know that genetics and the environment can increase the risk of a child getting diabetes. Signs and symptoms of type-1 diabetes The symptoms of type-1 diabetes usually develop suddenly over a period of days – or sometimes hours. They can develop over weeks and months too. Early signs and symptoms of type-1 diabetes include: frequent urinatio Continue reading >>

Autism Spectrum Disorder: Brock's Story

Autism Spectrum Disorder: Brock's Story

Brock Ott was 2 years old when his parents, Brian and Naidona, began to notice differences between him and other kids his age. Their research seemed to point to autism, but his local pediatrician and a neurologist both dismissed the idea. It wasn’t until he was 6 years old, entering first grade, that Brock was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a group of complex developmental disabilities that cause problems with social interaction and communication. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that autism spectrum disorders affect 1 in every 88 children in the United States. Although ASDs are more common today than childhood cancer, juvenile diabetes and pediatric AIDS combined, little is known about their cause or the most effective treatment. As ASD diagnoses soar, learning more about the condition has become more pressing than ever. That was the driving force behind the creation in 2008 of the Center for Autism Research (CAR) at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, the largest center of its kind dedicated exclusively to autism spectrum disorders. By enabling earlier diagnoses and developing more effective treatments, CAR hopes to minimize the time families like the Otts spend searching for answers. The signs Autism is a “spectrum disorder,” meaning that children affected by it show symptoms that range from mild to severe. Brock is on the high-functioning end of the spectrum, with above-average intelligence, but noticeable social, behavioral and language issues. At age 4, he had a 20-word vocabulary when his peers were virtual chatterboxes, and he had trouble with his memory; he couldn’t even remember the names of family members. His parents and family referred to these qualities as “Brockisms.” He would get fixated Continue reading >>

Blinking May Yield Clues About Autism

Blinking May Yield Clues About Autism

Dec. 12, 2011 -- When and why children blink may provide researchers some important clues about how children with autism process and take in information. Although it may not feel like it, blinking interrupts what we are watching. If a story or scene is engrossing, we can keep our eyes peeled. This is called blink inhibition. There are key differences between toddlers with and without autism spectrum disorder and when they blink their eyes. The new finding appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The CDC states that one in 110 children in the U.S. has an autism spectrum disorder. This is a range of developmental disorders that affect the ability to communicate and relate to others. In the new study, 2-year-olds with or without autism watched a video of a boy and girl playing. The video included physical movements as well as children interacting with each other. For the typical children, the rate of blinking decreased more when watching the emotional part than during physical movements. This pattern was reversed among children with autism. Blinking Patterns Shed Light on Autism “When we blink and when we don't can actually index how engaged people are with what we're looking at, and how important they perceive that thing to be,” says Warren Jones, PhD. He is the director of research at the Marcus Autism Center at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. Children without autism seem to be able to anticipate what is coming next based on facial expressions and wordplay. This is not the case among children with autism. “Without understanding the social context in which actions happen, children with autism may often be reacting, after the fact, to physical events that have already happened,” Jones says in an email. The findings give “res Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Autism

Type 1 Diabetes And Autism

Is there a link? The prevalence of diabetes in children and youth <18 years of age is ∼1 in 400–500 (1). The prevalence of diabetes for those aged <19 years from 1995–2000 in Ontario was 1.87 per 1,000 (2). Type 1 diabetes is recognized as a T-cell–mediated autoimmune process with a strong genetic contribution (3,4). In 2003, the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder was reported in one study as 3.4 per 1,000 children (5) and in another as 6.7 per 1,000 children (4 per 1,000 children with autism) aged 3–10 years (6) in the U.S. Like type 1 diabetes, both immune-mediated and genetic factors have been implicated in the development of autism (7,8). Based on recent clinical experiences and on the putative autoimmune etiology of these two conditions, we hypothesized that there would be an increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorder in a population of children with type 1 diabetes. To investigate this hypothesis, a retrospective chart review of nearly 1,000 children with type 1 diabetes followed at the Diabetes Clinic at The Hospital for Sick Children was performed to identify children with autism spectrum disorder. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Children with both type 1 diabetes and autism spectrum disorder were identified (n = 9) by a retrospective chart review of all children with diabetes (n = 984 in 2002) attending the Diabetes Clinic at The Hospital for Sick Children. With respect to autism spectrum disorder, the data selected included age at diagnosis, method of diagnosis, and family history of autism spectrum disorder or learning disorders. For those identified, the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder had been made previously by either a psychiatrist or developmental pediatrician. The 95% CI was calculated for the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder Continue reading >>

Autism Spectrum Disorder (in Children And Adults)

Autism Spectrum Disorder (in Children And Adults)

Characteristics of autism include impaired development in social interaction, communication, and behavior. The degree of autism varies from mild to severe. Severely afflicted persons with autism can appear to have a profound intellectual disabilty. Research tends to continue to refute the idea that immunizations cause autism. The cause of autism is unknown. The optimal treatment of autism involves an educational or vocational program that is suited to the developmental level of the child or adult, respectively. It is important for the unique medical and mental-health needs of people with autism to be addressed in order to optimize both their life expectancy and quality of life. Persons with autism and those who care for them often engage in advocacy activities like the walk for autism during April, Autism Awareness Month. Autism Signs in Children: What Is Autism Spectrum Disorder? Medical Author: David Perlstein, MD FAAP Medical Editor: William C. Shiel, Jr., MD, FACP, FACR It is commonplace to have a family member or close friend with a child diagnosed with one of the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, including autistic disorder, Asperger disorder, pervasive developmental disorder). These are a set of neurodevelopmental disabilities affecting young children and adults, which are currently not considered "curable". The goals of management include minimizing the symptoms and maximizing both independent function and quality of life. These are not uncommon disorders. Their prevalence has been estimated as approximately 6.5 per 1000 children, or 1 in every 150 children. Many believe that there is an "Autism Epidemic." However, as with many diseases and disorders, there are many reasons for this high prevalence. Fortunately, significant media coverage and increased research h Continue reading >>

Diabetes Overview

Diabetes Overview

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are lifelong conditions. You can minimise the long-term risks and complications for your child. diabetes is a condition where the level of glucose (also known as sugar) in the blood is too high that's because the body is not using the glucose properly in type 1 diabetes, the main problem is that the insulin making cells in the pancreas are destroyed and not able to make enough insulin in type 2 diabetes, the main problem is that the body is not able to use the insulin effectively due to resistance to insulin both forms of diabetes are lifelong conditions - once diagnosed as having type 1 or type 2 diabetes, your child will always have it you can minimise the long term risks and complications for your child What is diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where the level of glucose (also known as sugar) in the blood is too high. That's because the body is not using the glucose properly. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to allow glucose from food to move from the blood into cells in the body where it can be used for fuel for energy. Insulin is produced by the pancreas. Diabetes occurs when the insulin making cells in the pancreas are unable to make enough insulin or when there is resistance to the effects of insulin. You might find it helpful to watch a Diabetes UK animation (8 minutes 44 seconds) about diabetes and the body. © Diabetes UK. This video has been reproduced from the Diabetes UK website with the kind permission of Diabetes UK, the charity for people in the UK with diabetes. What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? In type 1 diabetes, the main problem is that the insulin making cells in the pancreas are destroyed and not able to make enough insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the main problem is that the body is not able to u Continue reading >>

Autism And Type 1 Diabetes Connection

Autism And Type 1 Diabetes Connection

Nine years ago, when I was first consulting with obstetricians who specialize in high risk pregnancies to talk about my wish to get pregnant, not one of the three doctors whom I visited mentioned any connection between a mother having Type 1 diabetes and her child having autism spectrum disorder. I can’t blame those doctors; it is only in the last few years, as more research is being conducted to try and figure out the current autism epidemic, that such a link has been found. Autism is a complex neurological disorder that affects the connections between various regions of the brain, impacting a person’s ability to produce and process language and to read the nonverbal social cues that are an otherwise intuitive part of human communication. Autism is considered to be a spectrum disorder because it affects people in a range of ways, from most severe impairment to a more mild condition known as Asperger syndrome. Wherever a person falls on the autism spectrum, living with a neurological challenge is not an easy thing. My seven-year-old son was diagnosed with mild autism at age three. His diagnosis came after a few years of visiting different specialists who were investigating his speech delay. The first specialists we visited, along with our pediatrician who saw my son frequently, dismissed autism because of my son’s smiling and natural interaction with me. Now doctors know more — that children with autism easily relate to their loved ones and want to connect with others; it is not the desire to be isolated that makes people with autism engage in repetitive behaviors. Rather, that behavior comes out of seeking safety and soothing in a world that is too often too loud and confusing. I know this behavior well from when my son gets overwhelmed. Eventually we received Continue reading >>

Could Your Child Have Diabetes?

Could Your Child Have Diabetes?

More than 15,000 children are diagnosed with type 1 every year. Make sure you know the telltale signs -- they're all too easy to dismiss. When Chloe Powell started begging for one more drink of water every night, her father, Charles, thought his then 7-year-old was using a common bedtime stall tactic. "I was irritated that she wouldn't go to sleep," admits Dr. Powell, who's a family physician in Dallas. With all she was drinking, he wasn't surprised when she began wetting the bed. But when Chloe couldn't make it through a conversation without having to use the bathroom, he became concerned. "I figured she had a urinary-tract infection, and she'd take some antibiotics and feel better," says Dr. Powell. He wasn't at all prepared for what his daughter's urine test showed: a dangerously high level of sugar that was a clear indicator of type 1 diabetes. In an instant, Chloe, now 10, went from being a kid who never thought twice about the foods she ate or the energy she burned to one who'd face a lifetime of carbohydrate counting, finger pricks, and insulin injections. A Disease on the Rise Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that causes the body's immune system to mistakenly destroy healthy cells in the pancreas that produce the hormone insulin. (Type 2, on the other hand, occurs when the body doesn't respond to the insulin that's being made.) Insulin ensures that sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream gets into the body's cells where it's needed for energy; without insulin, sugar builds up in the blood, which can be deadly. It's important to begin insulin therapy as soon as possible because high blood-sugar levels can cause permanent vision and nerve problems as well as damage to blood vessels, increasing the risk of heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease. Since the 198 Continue reading >>

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