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Symptoms Of Diabetes In Children

Diabetes In Children: What To Expect

Diabetes In Children: What To Expect

If your child is diagnosed with diabetes, you may feel overwhelmed, angry and worried about the future. A diabetes care team can help with the challenges that lie ahead. Most children who develop diabetes will have type 1 diabetes, which is where the body is unable to produce insulin. This means they will need regular insulin injections. A small but increasing number of children in the UK are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, which can be associated with being overweight. Type 1 diabetes, which this page focuses on, is not caused by being overweight. It's perfectly normal to feel upset or worried when your child is diagnosed with diabetes. But having the condition doesn't have to take away your child's freedom, or end your usual family life. What it does mean is that you have to carefully manage your child's condition as part of daily life. Professor Peter Hindmarsh of the University College Hospital in London explains what you should expect if your child is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. You and your child should be introduced to a specialist diabetes care team within one working day of diagnosis. Your child will be offered care from this team, either as a hospital in-patient, or delivered in your own home. This will depend on your preferences and your child's needs. If your child is admitted to hospital, there should be facilities for you to stay at the hospital too. "The first few days with your care team is the starting point of your education about diabetes," says Professor Hindmarsh. "You'll learn all about the condition, from blood glucose testing and giving insulin to your child, to food and exercise." Your care team can include, among others: a consultant paediatrician who specialises in diabetes a children's diabetes specialist nurse a dietitian who is fa Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes In Children

Signs Of Diabetes In Children

What to look for: Symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children One of the early signs of diabetes in children is increased urination and thirst. When blood-sugar is high it triggers a reaction in the body that pulls fluid from tissues. This will leave your son or daughter constantly thirsty, resulting in a need for more bathroom breaks throughout the day. Below are some other warning signs that you should be aware of. Fatigue: If your child is constantly tired it may be a sign that his or her body is having trouble turning sugar in the bloodstream into energy. Changes in vision: High blood sugar levels can lead to blurred vision or other eyesight problems. Fruity smelling breath: If your kid’s breath smells fruity, it could be a result of excess sugar in the blood. Extreme hunger and unexplained weight loss: When your son or daughter’s muscles and organs aren’t receiving enough energy, it can trigger extreme hunger. And sudden weight loss—especially if he or she is eating more—should not be ignored. Unusual behavior: If your child seems more moody or restless than normal—and it’s in conjunction with the symptoms above—it could be cause for concern. Other symptoms of diabetes in children Be on the lookout if your child is lethargic, shows heavy breathing, or experiences nausea and vomiting. When it goes untreated, type 1 diabetes can be life-threatening. If you’re concerned that your son or daughter is showing signs of childhood diabetes it’s important that you schedule a doctor’s appointment as soon as possible. So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of… Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than normal… The reality is that signs o Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes In Children

Signs Of Diabetes In Children

The most common type of diabetes in children is type 1 diabetes, although, as children are becoming more and more obese, the incidence of type 2 diabetes is increasing. Type 1 diabetes in children is considered an autoimmune disease, in which the immune system cells are acting against the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, also known as the “beta cells”. When the beta cells are damaged by the child’s immune system, the pancreas no longer makes insulin so that the child needs to take exogenous insulin (insulin given through injection rather than made by the pancreas). When the insulin is no longer in the body, the blood glucose levels rise, resulting in the following signs: Weight loss. Rather than having the cells of the body take up insulin, the glucose is wasted and is instead excreted by the kidneys. This valuable source of calories and fuel are flushed out of the body, resulting in weight loss. Dehydration. When the blood glucose levels become elevated, the kidneys put out more urine. This helps the kidneys get rid of glucose but, as water is excreted along with the glucose, the child becomes dehydrated, which can become life-threatening. Organ Damage. As the disease progresses, the child can develop evidence of increased blood sugar levels. The elevated blood sugar levels cause damage to various organs of the body, including the heart, kidneys, and eyes. When this occurs, the child suffers from an increased risk of atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries. Diseases like diabetic neuropathy, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy, and heart disease begin to develop in the child’s body. Diabetic ketoacidosis. If the body cannot use glucose as a source of cellular fuel, the body instead breaks down fatty tissue. One of the byproducts of fatty tis Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes an unhealthy amount of a simple sugar (glucose) to build up in a person's blood. Someone with type 1 diabetes can't produce enough insulin, a hormone that moves glucose from the bloodstream into cells throughout the body, where it supplies energy and fuels growth. Normally, a child's immune system protects her body from diseases by destroying unhealthy cells and germs. But when a child has type 1 diabetes, her body also mistakenly attacks the healthy insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). Without these cells, her pancreas produces very little or no insulin, which leads to an abnormally high amount of sugar in her blood. Without proper care, type 1 diabetes can cause serious, wide-ranging health problems that can damage organs throughout the body over the long-term. If your child has been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, it's understandable that you might worry. But diabetes can be kept under control by carefully monitoring your child's blood sugar and following her treatment plan. A team of doctors, nurses, and nutritionists can help your child be as healthy as possible and teach her to manage the condition so she stays that way. What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children? Symptoms of type 1 diabetes include: Extreme thirst Peeing more than usual (You might notice more wet diapers if your child is very young, or "accidents" if your child is potty trained.) Extreme hunger Weight loss Unusual tiredness Crankiness Yeast infection or diaper rash If your child has one or more of these symptoms, call his doctor right away. Type 1 diabetes symptoms can start quickly and become very serious without treatment. Get medical care immediately if your child has any of Continue reading >>

Warning Signs Of Diabetes In Toddlers

Warning Signs Of Diabetes In Toddlers

Diabetes is a serious disease that can lead to other serious conditions such as heart disease and kidney failure. According to the Colorado Department of Public Health, about 13,000 new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in children every year. Parents and physician should be aware of the symptoms of diabetes in children so that they can be diagnosed early and begin receiving necessary treatment. Video of the Day Type 1 diabetes results because the body makes very little or no insulin. About 5 percent to 10 percent of diabetes cases are due to type 1 diabetes, counting children and adults. Most cases of diabetes are type 2. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn't can't make enough insulin or doesn't use it properly. The number of children with type 2 diabetes has been increasing every year, but young children do not always have the classical symptoms of diabetes. The symptoms of type 1 diabetes include extreme thirst, frequent urination, sudden changes in vision, increased appetite, weight loss, lethargy, heavy breathing and fruity, sweet or fermented breath. The first sign a parent might recognize is stupor or unconsciousness. Testing will reveal sugar in the urine. Type 2 diabetes has the same symptoms, along with slow healing of wounds or sores, itching, high blood pressure and dark velvety patches of skin around the neck or armpits. Often, young children with diabetes don't have the classical symptoms. Less than 1 percent of all children with diabetes are diagnosed before their first birthdays, and less than 2 percent are diagnosed before 3 years of age, according to a January/February 1999 article in the journal "Pediatrics and Child Health," so doctors may not be looking for diabetes when treating children with other symptoms. Little children may be treated for respirat Continue reading >>

What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes?

What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes?

People with type 2 diabetes often appear symptom-free in the early stages. That's the reason that as many as 30% of people with type 2 diabetes are unaware of their disease. When symptoms do appear, they may come on gradually and be very subtle. At the time of diagnoses many people have some of the following symptoms: Feeling tired Being unusually thirsty Passing large volumes of urine, especially during the night Having frequent infections Having sores that don't heal Having blurred eyesight People with type 2 diabetes often share certain characteristics and related problems. The most common ones are: Weight A person with type 2 diabetes is usually overweight or obese. One way to determine obesity is to calculate a person's BMI (Body Mass Index), which is a number that is calculated based on a person's weight and height. If a child or teen's BMI is greater than the 85 th percentile for their gender and age (meaning that their score is within the top fifteen percent) they are considered overweight. If the BMI is greater than the 95th percentile (or within the top five percent) for gender and age, the child or teen is considered obese. In terms of their BMI score, an adult with a BMI higher than 25 is overweight and an adult with a BMI higher than 30 is obese. The Centers for Disease Control has BMI charts to help you. Lipids/Cholesterol Insulin resistance – which is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes - tends to have a negative affect on a person's lipid (cholesterol) levels. If untreated over several years, high "bad" cholesterol and low "good" cholesterol increase the risk for cardiovascular (heart) problems. For a person less than 20 years of age, the desired fasting lipid levels are: LDL (bad) cholesterol should normally be less than 130 mg/dL. If someone Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children?

What Are The Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children?

Type 1 Diabetes in Children: Symptoms, Causes & Management Often referred to as juvenile diabetes, type 1 diabetes in children is a very critical condition if no serious actions are taken to manage the symptoms. Managing diabetes at an early age requires difficult and careful regimens, which young children usually dislike. Diabetic children may feel a little emotionally left out because of their condition. However, with proper diagnosis, treatment protocol and emotional support, both parents and children may live a normal happy life. Listed below are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes: Symptom Description Increased urination and thirst Due to elevated blood sugar levels, the fluid present within the tissues is pulled out, so the child may feel thirsty. This will enhance the thirst, followed by high water intake and more frequent urination. Feeling excessively hungry Organs and muscles are also deprived of energy due to insufficient insulin in the body, which affects the normal tissue uptake of sugar in cells. All these factors can lead to excessive hunger and food intake. Weight loss Even when your child is consuming high proportion of calories, he may still lose some weight mainly because of poor energy levels. In the early stages of diabetes, a lot of people tend to lose significant weight due to fat redistribution. Fatigue Lethargy and tiredness are common symptoms as the cells are unable to get enough sugar. Irritability If the condition remains undiagnosed, your child may appear irritable with twitchy mood swings. Blurred vision Elevated blood sugar levels lead to abnormal fluid movement across the lens and other tissues of the body, which leads to blurred vision. Yeast infection Girls who are with type 1 diabetes may be affected by genital yeast infection. This infec Continue reading >>

8 Symptoms Of Diabetes In Children You Need To Know About

8 Symptoms Of Diabetes In Children You Need To Know About

Diabetes has become increasingly easier to manage through the years, but if left untreated or undiscovered, it is deadly. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, according to Diabetes.com. And while less than one percent of children and teenagers have diabetes, those numbers are on the rise. Know these symptoms to spot them in your child before it's too late. Symptoms 1. Abnormal thirst Diabetes makes sugar build up in your bloodstream, which in turn pulls fluid from the tissues, according to Mayo Clinic. Noticing an extremely thirsty child is one of the easiest symptoms to spot. 2. Frequent peeing Since your child is drinking so much, naturally bathroom trips will become more frequent. 3. Blurry vision It's possible your child needs glasses, but it could also indicate diabetes. Sugar pulls the lenses' fluid away from the eye, which makes focusing difficult. 4. Moodiness If your child is suddenly grumpier, it could mean they have undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. (Obviously, many other things besides diabetes can make your child suddenly moody, so consult a doctor before you assume it's diabetes.) 5. Losing weight Sudden weight loss can occur because your body doesn't have the energy sugar supplies. Without it, your fat stores and muscles shrink. 6. Intense hunger Your child's diabetic body is crying for energy, because without enough insulin, the sugar is not moving through to the cells. Because of this, your child will be hungry - even after eating. 7. Itchy skin Diabetes can make your skin itchy through poor circulation, or because of yeast infections, according to the American Diabetes Association. 8. Exhaustion Unusual tiredness can occur in children with undiagnosed diabetes; the lack of sugar in their cells can make them have no energy. Wh Continue reading >>

My Daughter Has Type 1 Diabetes And We Almost Missed All The Symptoms

My Daughter Has Type 1 Diabetes And We Almost Missed All The Symptoms

Editor’s note: This post is not intended as medical advice. Always consult a medical professional or physician before treatment of any kind. The strange vomiting started during another overcast day in Sweden. With three kids, I had weathered plenty of stomach viruses. But something was different this time. My two-year-old daughter was smiling and laughing two seconds earlier, but what she threw up looks like a fully formed marshmallow, and her breath smells like cantaloupe. Could this be some rare virus unique to Scandinavia? Surely, if there were such a thing, I would have heard about it from one of the mothers in our community of ex-pats. I have been known to overreact when it comes to my children’s health. “Waiting it out” is not in my vocabulary. Why then am I not rushing to the emergency room? Maybe I’m skeptical about what kind of care we’ll get under socialized medicine. Or maybe I know deep down that this time it isn’t my overactive imagination but a potentially serious illness. I am paralyzed by my own thoughts: Will the hospital staff speak English? Will I be waiting for hours only to be told to go home and give her Pedialyte? Do they even have Pedialyte in Sweden? My mother calls long distance from the States. Since she has long functioned as my “personal trainer” in irrational anxiety, I try to hide the truth from her. “What’s wrong with Alana?” she asks, panic rippling through her voice. “It’s nothing. She just threw up some milk.” “What’s going on? Is she okay?” She’s escalating. “It’s not so bad,” I hear myself lie. “It smells kind of sweet.” “What did she eat? Does she have a fever? Was she exposed to any other sick kids? I knew you shouldn’t move over there. Do you even have a doctor you can call? What Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

The most common type of diabetes in children is type 1 diabetes. In fact, according to the American Diabetes Association, type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in children. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 5 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in the U.S. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes may also be known by a variety of other names, including: Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) Juvenile diabetes Brittle diabetes Sugar diabetes There are two forms of type 1 diabetes: Idiopathic type 1. This refers to rare forms of the disease with no known cause. Immune-mediated diabetes. An autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Immune-mediated diabetes is the most common form of type 1 diabetes and is generally referred to as type 1 diabetes. What causes type 1 diabetes? The cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. However, it is believed that people inherit a tendency to develop diabetes, and that some outside trigger may be involved. Type 1 diabetes is the result of the body's failure to produce insulin, the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. This is the result of an autoimmune process in which the body's immune system attacks and destroys the insulin producing cells of the pancreas. When glucose cannot enter the cells, it builds up in the blood, depriving the cells of nutrition. People with type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections and regularly monitor their blood sugar levels. What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes often appears suddenly. In children, type 1 diabetes symptoms may resemble flu symptoms. The following are the most common symptoms for type 1 diabetes. However, each ch Continue reading >>

Detecting Diabetes In Children Before Symptoms Appear

Detecting Diabetes In Children Before Symptoms Appear

Doctors may be able to detect type 1 diabetes in children before they exhibit any symptoms of the disease, new research from Sweden shows. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that often appears in childhood and is the result of the body being unable to produce the hormone insulin. Scientists taking part in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) project have discovered four markers, or autoantibodies, in the blood of the study’s participants that make it possible to detect the disease earlier, meaning that treatment can also start earlier. Type 1 diabetes occurs when beta cells in the pancreas are destroyed by the autoantibodies. Once the beta cells are destroyed, the body can no longer produce insulin and cannot regulate blood sugar. Lead researcher Ake Lernmark, from Sweden’s Lund University, says that measuring the levels of autoantibdodies in children’s blood indicates whether their immune system has started to attack beta cells. He says the autoantibodies appear years before the disease is usually diagnosed. “So the TEDDY study has discovered that the appearance of autoantibodies against insulin producing cells, appear during the first years of life, but the disease is not diagnosed until some ten years later So that’s the discovery. We now know where to look for the trigger so we have to explain why this auto anti-bodies develop and now we know that we should look during the first years of life,” Lernmark told Reuters The TEDDY study, which is funded by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), involves 8,600 children - with an increased hereditary risk of type 1 diabetes - from Sweden, the United States, Germany and Finland. Lernmark’s work has revealed triggers of type 1 diabetes in children at a much earlier stage th Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. This often makes it seem like signs and symptoms of diabetes appear suddenly. That’s why it’s important to pay attention to your body, rather than simply brushing them off. To that end, here are some type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms that you may want to watch out for: If you’re experiencing frequent urination your body might be telling you that your kidneys are trying to expel excess sugar in your blood. The resulting dehydration may then cause extreme thirst. Along the same lines, the lack of available fluids may also give you dry mouth and itchy skin. If you experience increased hunger or unexpected weight loss it could be because your body isn’t able to get adequate energy from the food you eat. High blood sugar levels can affect blood flow and cause nerve damage, which makes healing difficult. So having slow-healing cuts/sores is also a potential sign of diabetes. Yeast infections may occur in men and women who have diabetes as a result of yeast feeding on glucose. Other signs of diabetes Pay attention if you find yourself feeling drowsy or lethargic; pain or numbness in your extremities; vision changes; fruity or sweet-smelling breath which is one of the symptoms of high ketones; and experiencing nausea or vomiting—as these are additional signs that something is not right. If there’s any question, see your doctor immediately to ensure that your blood sugar levels are safe and rule out diabetes. So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of… Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than Continue reading >>

8 Signs Your Child May Have Type 1 Diabetes

8 Signs Your Child May Have Type 1 Diabetes

Source: Web exclusive, August 2010 Over 300,000 Canadians have type 1 diabetes, yet when your own child is diagnosed with this disease, it can come as a shock. ‘Most kids who get diabetes do not have another family member with it,’ points out diabetes specialist Dr. Maureen Clement in Vernon, B.C. ‘Often, it’s just a bolt of lightning.’ Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed during childhood, often between the ages of 10 to 13. There’s nothing parents can do to prevent this type of diabetes. However, if you notice signs your child might have the disease, you can take action to prevent a serious complication called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), in which the body runs out of insulin to process sugar and begins to break down fat instead. If your child shows indications of type 1 diabetes, says Clement, then don’t delay in visiting your pediatrician. ‘Don’t say, ‘let’s wait a week or two.’ Get your kid tested that day to make sure they don’t have diabetes.’ And if it does turn out that your child is diabetic, remember that as long as the disease is well managed, she can still enjoy good health her whole life. Here’s what to watch out for. Sign 1: Unquenchable thirst Children with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes may be constantly thirsty. That’s because as their blood-glucose level rises, fluid is pulled from their body tissues. These kids may especially crave sweet, cold drinks. Sign 2: Frequent urination What goes in must come out, so it stands to reason that a child who is drinking more will also visit the washroom more. If your kid is taking an unusual number of bathroom breaks, there may be an underlying and serious reason behind it. A younger child who was previously toilet trained at night may start to wet the bed again. Sign 3: Weight loss A Continue reading >>

Children And Diabetes

Children And Diabetes

Tweet Throughout the world, incidences of diabetes are on the rise, and consequently so is diabetes amongst children. Most children are affected by type 1 diabetes in childhood. However, the number of children and young adults affected by type 2 diabetes is beginning to rise, particularly in America. Approximately 90% of young people with diabetes suffer from type 1 and the number of patients who are children varies from place to place. A figure of 17 per 100,000 children developing diabetes each year has been reported. As metabolic syndrome, obesity and bad diets spread, so too have the first incidences of type 2 diabetes, previously incredibly rare. Further relevant pages Diabetes & pregnancy Juvenile diabetes Keeping your kids free from diabetes Teenage diabetes and blood glucose testing How is diabetes caused in children? The actual causes of the diabetic condition are little understood, in both children and adults. It is widely speculated that diabetes occurred when inherited genetic characteristics are triggered by environmental factors such as diet or exercise. Many type 1 diabetic children do not have diabetes in their families however, so the exact cause remains a mystery. Type 2 diabetes amongst children is usually caused by an extremely bad diet from a very young age, coupled with a sedentary lifestyle without exercise. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children

Diabetes In Children

Type 1 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes in children: 90 to 95 per cent of under 16s with diabetes have this type. It is caused by the inability of the pancreas to produce the hormone insulin. Type 1 diabetes is classified as an autoimmune disease, meaning a condition in which the body's immune system 'attacks' one of the body's own tissues or organs. In Type 1 diabetes it's the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas that are destroyed. How common is it? Childhood diabetes isn't common, but there are marked variations around the world: in England and Wales 17 children per 100,000 develop diabetes each year in Scotland the figure is 25 per 100,000 in Finland it's 43 per 100,000 in Japan it's 3 per 100,000. The last 30 years has seen a threefold increase in the number of cases of childhood diabetes, particularly in the under 5s. In Europe and America, Type 2 diabetes has been seen for the first time in young people. This is mainly caused by the increasing trend towards obesity in our society. But obesity doesn't explain the increase in the numbers of Type 1 diabetes in children – who make up the majority of new cases. What causes childhood diabetes? As with adults, the cause of childhood diabetes is not understood. It probably involves a combination of genes and environmental triggers. The majority of children who develop Type 1 don't have a family history of diabetes. What are the symptoms? The main symptoms are the same as in adults. They tend to come on over a few weeks: drinking more than usual, including overnight frequent urination, including overnight weight loss tiredness. Symptoms that are more typical for children include: Sometimes diabetic ketoacidosis occurs before diabetes is diagnosed, although this happens less often in the UK due to better a Continue reading >>

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