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Symptoms Of Diabetes Before Diagnosis

What Are The Real Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes?

What Are The Real Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Contrary to what you might read elsewhere, the actual symptoms that most people with Type 2 diabetes experience right before they are given a diabetes diagnosis are not increased thirst, a continual need to urinate, and unexplained weight loss. These symptoms are typical of Type 1 diabetes. And they also occur in people with Type 2 Diabetes when their beta cells have become so damaged by years of exposure to very high blood sugars that they no longer can secrete any insulin. But nowadays most people are diagnosed with diabetes early enough that they have not experienced this kind of diabetic damage. Neither do many people who are fully diabetic have several other diabetic symptoms you see listed on the American Diabetes Association's web site: slow healing of cuts and bruises, and pain and tingling in their hands and feet. These symptoms also are associated with long-standing diabetes, as they are the result of diabetic nerve damage, a diabetic complication that typically takes years to develop. People with diabetes may experience three symptoms also listed on the ADA's list of diabetic symptoms in the months or year before diagnosis: blurry vision, extreme tiredness, and feeling very hungry though eating sufficient food. But so do many other people who don't have diabetes, since these symptoms can be produced by thyroid problems, allergies, or coming down with the flu. So these symptoms alone are not enough to suggest that a person has diabetes. Though if you do experience relentless hunger, which often produces the obesity so many doctors incorrectly believe causes diabetes, it is a very good idea to ask your doctor to test your blood sugar to ensure that in your case this relentless hunger is not a true symptom of diabetes or prediabetes. That said, however, the most Continue reading >>

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

According to the latest American Heart Association's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics, about 8 million people 18 years and older in the United States have type 2 diabetes and do not know it. Often type 1 diabetes remains undiagnosed until symptoms become severe and hospitalization is required. Left untreated, diabetes can cause a number of health complications. That's why it's so important to both know what warning signs to look for and to see a health care provider regularly for routine wellness screenings. Symptoms In incidences of prediabetes, there are no symptoms. People may not be aware that they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes because they have no symptoms or because the symptoms are so mild that they go unnoticed for quite some time. However, some individuals do experience warning signs, so it's important to be familiar with them. Prediabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes No symptoms Increased or extreme thirst Increased thirst Increased appetite Increased appetite Increased fatigue Fatigue Increased or frequent urination Increased urination, especially at night Unusual weight loss Weight loss Blurred vision Blurred vision Fruity odor or breath Sores that do not heal In some cases, no symptoms In some cases, no symptoms If you have any of these symptoms, see your health care provider right away. Diabetes can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. Who should be tested for prediabetes and diabetes? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are: If your blood glucose levels are in normal range, testing should be done about every three years. If you have prediabetes, you should be checked for diabetes every one to two years after diagnosis. Tests for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes There are three ty Continue reading >>

What Symptoms Were You Experiencing Before Being Diagnosed With Diabetes? - Quora

What Symptoms Were You Experiencing Before Being Diagnosed With Diabetes? - Quora

What symptoms were you experiencing before being diagnosed with diabetes? Two things were going on for about a year before I was diagnosed: 1. Greatly increased fluid intake/outgo. The odd thing about this is that I am a fairly sedentary person - all my daily activities are indoors; no great amount of physical activity. For that, I must resort to something deliberate - walks for the sake of walking, a gym habit, etc. Nevertheless, for several months I was ingesting a gallon of water a day (usually in the form of iced tea) and simultaneously pissing like a race horse. 2. Steadily decreasing weight. This was a Very Welcome Development! I am short, an apple-shaped body type, and getting chunky through the torso was a constant feature of my 40s and 50s. So, when I began to drop two or three pounds a month, month after month - well, yippee skippy! Diagnosis came when I made a visit to my GP for some other reason - a cold, maybe. He ordered a blood panel, prescribed some meds and sent me home. The next day, I had an urgent email and phone message from him to come right back immediately. My blood glucose was 275. I had an A1C reading (a metric relating to average blood glucose level for the previous 90 days) of 13.8, when normal is 45. My pissing and weight loss were the result of a sustained unhealthy/abnormal blood glucose level. My bodys defense was to piss off the excess blood sugar. Hence the copious intake of fluid and the simultaneous copious pissing. And, my body also was losing weight as I was pissing off what would otherwise have maintained or increased my body mass. I was relatively lucky. Once we got the blood glucose levels back to normal, I had escaped damage to my eyes and kidneys. I did have some peripheral nerve damage in my feet and legs. Fortunately, blood Continue reading >>

What Symptoms Did You Have Prior To Diagnosis?

What Symptoms Did You Have Prior To Diagnosis?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community What symptoms did you have prior to diagnosis? I had a blood test yesterday morning as doc suspects Diabetes, I must say after online research I thought of it myself too, but I'm sure you all know the risks of google, it can give you all sorts :/ So I've been pretty rough over the past maybe 6 weeks, it's got progressively worse over the past week. I feel as though I'm continually complaining about something different, which after googling all of my symptoms it suggests diabetes. For the past 6-8 weeks I've suffered really severe itching, mostly on the backs of my legs and sometimes my arms but it can come up anywhere, it lasts a while and then disappears. I could rip my skin off its so bad. I've caused bruises all over my legs from scratching so hard! I've also seen a doctor last week for kidney pain (which only lasted two days) and frequent urination for maybe again a month - 6 weeks, I've been waking in the night desperate and during the day I'm probably going every 30 min! Everyone's commenting on how much I go to the bathroom!! I've had a few days over the last 3-4 days which I've had blurry vision ( I said I felt like I had a film over my eyes) nothing was totally clear, and I'm sure I have pretty great vision usually! This came with headaches over the weekend. I'm also having a pretty bad issue with thrush, I've had it 3 times over the past 2 months! It drives me mad. All I do is complain about different things, they must all mean something but I'm sure people are getting bored of hearing I'm unwell for one reason or another. I'd like to hear other people's opinions or what made them get tested etc. Weight loss. I'm 6 foot 2 and my weight plumm Continue reading >>

The Stages Of Type 1 Diabetes (it Starts Earlier Than We Thought)

The Stages Of Type 1 Diabetes (it Starts Earlier Than We Thought)

My daughter Bisi was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes three years ago at the age of six. The first night after she was diagnosed, once she finally fell asleep in her hospital bed, tossing and turning despite the IV in her arm, I remember standing outside in the hall with my husband and a couple of medical residents, talking with them about her diagnosis. “Could this have been coming on for a while?” we asked them. I described how for a couple of years, Bisi had been almost unbearably cranky when she was hungry—to the point where I’d asked her pediatrician more than once if something might be wrong. No, the residents told us. Type 1 diabetes comes on very suddenly, in a matter of weeks, as the body’s beta cells suddenly die out under attack from the immune system. Every doctor or nurse we spoke with during the three days in the hospital (except for one, who said that our instincts were probably right), echoed what the two residents, fresh from medical school, told us. But it turns out they were wrong. JDRF and the American Diabetes Association, supported by other organizations in the field, recently put forth a new staging system for type 1 diabetes, where full-blown disease, like what landed Bisi in the hospital, is characterized as stage 3, part of an extended auto-immune process that often starts in infancy. This fall, Dr. Richard Insel, JDRF’s Chief Scientific Officer, explained the classification system to a group of reporters, talking through the importance of early diagnosis, and the hope that diagnosing the disease at an earlier stage could lead to breakthroughs in stopping the beta-cell destruction process—essentially, stopping the disease before it starts. Insel explained that stage 1 is when people test positive for multiple pancreatic islet auto-a Continue reading >>

What Were Your Symptoms Before You Were Diagnosed

What Were Your Symptoms Before You Were Diagnosed

What were your symptoms before you were diagnosed What were the symptoms you had before offical diagnosis of diabetes. I have been tired for months, and had a huge lose of appetite. I thought diabetes made you eat more. Of course I was thirsty, but i had no appetite especially at dinner time. I was tired alot too but thought that was due to my hectic life!!!! I was thirsty too and up and down alot at night in the bathroom. Then I began being dizzy alot. I had had vertigo in the past but knew this was somehow different. I was also having alot of headaches. My dr. told me both symptoms are indicative of high blood sugar. Not everyone has these though. I had no symptoms whatsoever. Diabetes runs in my family but I felt totally fine. I was really shocked when my blood tests came back. I was noticing how my vision seemed to be getting worse. Blurry off and on. Had a bad bruise that just wouln't go away, too. No other symptoms at all. WELL I HADA EPISODE OF SEVERE ITCHING BELOW. THEN A PIMPLE. IT THEN TURNED INTO AN ABSCESS. I WENT TO A CLINIC. THE DOCTOR THERE SENT ME TO THE EMERGENCY ROOM.THERE I WAS ADMITTED ON THE SPOT. ANTIBIOTICS AND INSULIN. I HAD A STAY IN INTENSIVE CARE FOR ABOUT 5 HRS. I, too, had no symptoms that I noticed. My doctor discovered it in a routine blood test. She had me have a glucose tolerance test and it verified it. Diabetes runs in my family. My grandmother died from complicatiions of it and I had 2 cousins with it. Doctors had been trying to pin diabetes on my for most of my life since I've been fat. I was tested the year before while I was in the hospital for MRSA and it was negative. I didn't think I had any symtoms. But when I look back I had a headache just about every day. I did get up twice in the middle of the night to use the bathroom, wh Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Type 1 diabetes tends to start when people are under 25, although it can be diagnosed later in life. With Type 1 diabetes (also called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. When glucose can't enter the cells, it builds up in the blood and the body's cells literally starve to death. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections and regularly monitor their blood glucose levels. The cause of Type 1 diabetes is unknown but it is thought to be an autoimmune disease, where the body's immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Not all diabetes in children and teenagers is the kind called Type 1. Type 2 diabetes is being seen increasingly in young people. Where Type 1 diabetes always requires insulin, Type 2 can require insulin but often it can be treated with other medicines such as tablets. This section deals only with young people who have Type 1 diabetes. We have talked to a range of young people who've lived with Type 1 diabetes from those who were very young when they were first diagnosed to those who were diagnosed when they were teenagers. We have also talked to some young people only recently diagnosed. In this section young people talk about the signs and symptoms that prompted them to seek medical help. Signs of diabetes Most people remembered that the first symptoms of diabetes had crept up on them over weeks or even months- most had felt thirsty all the time and said that they started to drink more and more and found that they were unable to quench their thirst. Lots of people described realising something must be wrong wi Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Symptoms Develop Suddenly?

Can Diabetes Symptoms Develop Suddenly?

I haven't experienced any symptoms of diabetes in the past, but just in the last week or so, I have seen a dramatic increase in my urination frequency: I have to go about once an hour. And I seem to be constantly thirsty. Is it possible that symptoms of diabetes could materialize virtually overnight? Continue reading >>

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (It Could Save a Life) By: Rachelle Stocum / Blog Parents of children with diabetes will hear this question asked a million times. And each time you tell your story the story gets shorter and shorter. You begin to leave out details. Details that may one day save another child’s life. I wrote this for a couple of reasons. The first reason was to document the details and help other families who are searching for answers to unexplained symptoms. The second reason was to really get my emotions off my chest, and reflect. December 30, 2016 is a day I will never forget. This date will now be forever know to us as Carter’s “dia-versary.” This was the day my seven year old son Carter was diagnosed with Type one Diabetes. I still tear up when I say or even write those words… my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. The week before Christmas my son Carter had so many complaints. He’s not a whiny kid by any means so this was unusual for him. He’s actually the most compliant child I know. When I ask him to do something he does it. So when he first complained of a stomach ache I thought he was coming down with the flu. It seems reasonable that a child would get sick in December. So I tried to wake him up but it was really hard. He was groggy and didn’t want to wake up. Once he was finally woke up I told him that I didn’t want him to eat anything until I was able to get grandma’s monitor and test his blood sugar. He drank some water but understood what I was asking of him. He didn’t complain or cry even though he was hungry. I knew that was bad because when I was pregnant with him I had gestational diabetes. My blood glucose only ran about 120 from what I can recall, and I knew normal was around Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms, Diagnosis, & Testing

Diabetes Symptoms, Diagnosis, & Testing

Thanks to the way diabetes is dramatized on television and in movies, many associate it with its more dramatic symptoms. Many think of the weakness and confusion that comes with a hypoglycemic episode, or the disabilities, like vision and circulation problems, associated with uncontrolled blood sugar. Some may even associate obesity with Type II diabetes. Not everyone with diabetes knows they have it, however. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), more than a quarter of people with diabetes are undiagnosed. If you suspect you have diabetes, or are worried that someone in your life may have the illness, you should certainly watch out for symptoms, and if you see persistent signs of diabetes, you should seek a definitive diagnosis. The greatest threat diabetes poses is the damage that high blood sugar does to a person’s health over time, and the best treatment seeks to keep blood sugar at a healthy level. Left undiagnosed, high blood sugar will gradually degrade a person’s health. But once it’s diagnosed, a diabetic can begin to safeguard their lives against the disease. Symptoms of Diabetes How do people know if they have diabetes? Many of them don’t know, and they’re walking around with an undetected and untreated health problem. Even if you don’t have any diabetes symptoms, it’s important for you to have your blood sugar tested with your yearly checkup, just to be sure your blood sugar numbers are still in a good range. If you do see the following symptoms—in yourself, or in one of your loved ones—you should see a doctor as soon as possible. All of these symptoms can have causes besides diabetes, but no matter what, it’s important to find out what the cause is so it can be treated appropriately. Because everyone is different, Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. This often makes it seem like signs and symptoms of diabetes appear suddenly. That’s why it’s important to pay attention to your body, rather than simply brushing them off. To that end, here are some type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms that you may want to watch out for: If you’re experiencing frequent urination your body might be telling you that your kidneys are trying to expel excess sugar in your blood. The resulting dehydration may then cause extreme thirst. Along the same lines, the lack of available fluids may also give you dry mouth and itchy skin. If you experience increased hunger or unexpected weight loss it could be because your body isn’t able to get adequate energy from the food you eat. High blood sugar levels can affect blood flow and cause nerve damage, which makes healing difficult. So having slow-healing cuts/sores is also a potential sign of diabetes. Yeast infections may occur in men and women who have diabetes as a result of yeast feeding on glucose. Other signs of diabetes Pay attention if you find yourself feeling drowsy or lethargic; pain or numbness in your extremities; vision changes; fruity or sweet-smelling breath which is one of the symptoms of high ketones; and experiencing nausea or vomiting—as these are additional signs that something is not right. If there’s any question, see your doctor immediately to ensure that your blood sugar levels are safe and rule out diabetes. So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of… Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than Continue reading >>

Patient Comments: Diabetes - Symptoms

Patient Comments: Diabetes - Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetes can vary greatly from patient to patient. What were your symptoms at the onset of your disease? I had back pain, kidney infections, yeast infection, night sweats, and insomnia. I thought I had a kidney infection, but a new doctor at the clinic suggested an A1C test and it turned out my blood sugar was in the 200s that morning. Here we are and I have diabetes. I am a young man of 45 years now and I have been confirmed to have diabetes. Now I am having lots of symptom like weak erection, weakness of the body, dry lips and palms, and even restlessness in the legs and shrinking of my general body build ups. My head is itching very much now. I am 62 years old now. Since last 2 months glucose level in early morning is about 135 and after food glucose levels are about 115. Early morning my left leg and hand slightly painful. I had no symptoms, I was hypoglycemic for years, then about age 75 developed type 2 diabetes. I lost about 55 lb., and have controlled it with medication. A1C stays about 6.2, have presently had trouble with kidney infections and high blood pressure. When I got diabetes at 22 I had weight loss, no energy and was thirsty all the time. I also could not eat and was never hungry. I am 35 years old and was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes last summer. I took generally good care of myself and exercised on a regular basis. For at least the year before, I noticed that I had to urinate all the time, waking me up several times a night. In the month or so prior to being diagnosed, I lost 40 pounds and was thirsty all the time. One day I got extremely sick, could not keep anything down, had blurry vision, a rapid heartbeat, and began hyperventilating. My blood glucose level in the ER was in the high 500s and my A1C was 9.7. Since then, I have de Continue reading >>

How Did You Get Diagnosed?

How Did You Get Diagnosed?

Member T1 since 7/2006. novolog and levemir when you all were diagnosed, did any of you know you were sick? i was just at a routine physical, and they discovered that my BS was way over 600, and my first A1C was 11.5. i just thought i was tired and not eating right, but i had no idea i had been sick for probably 2 months. what was supposed to be a routine appointment turned into a four day stay at the hospital. was it that sudden for any of you? D.D. Family T1 Carb-loader, Extraordinaire @ 5.5 Amazing that you did not know you were sick. With me, I started showing symptoms right after a Thanksgiving Day meal. I was so thirsty, and I just kept drinking regular Coke. It was maybe two days before I went to a medical clinic. They sent me to my regular doctor (a day or two later). He put me on a low carb diet, and checked me into a hospital two days later, to learn how to use insulin. All-in-all, it was a week before I got treatment. I spent most of that time drinking water and running to the restroom. I don't even remember what my BGL was. The first night in the hospital, they gave me 10 units of type R insulin. I woke up in the middle of the night sick as a dog. I will always remember my first hypo! I was wondering how I would pay for my meter when I got out. They were several hundred dollars at that time. Now you get them for free. You need special shoes for hiking - and a bit of a special soul as well. I knew something was wrong. After about 3 weeks of intense thirst and blurry vision, the fatigue started. I almost passed out after my birthday dinner - barbequed shrimp. I was diagnosed a few days later after my husband insisted I see the doctor. By that time, I was in DKA. I ended up spending 2 and a half days in the hospital. They discovered I was Type 1 during my hosp Continue reading >>

D-spotting: Catching Type 1 Diabetes Before Diagnosis

D-spotting: Catching Type 1 Diabetes Before Diagnosis

D-Spotting: Catching Type 1 Diabetes Before Diagnosis D-Spotting: Catching Type 1 Diabetes Before Diagnosis Email addresses will not be shared with 3rd parties. See privacy policy We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. We've all heard the stories: a child or adult starts experiencing symptoms that seem to be nothing more than a cold or the flu. There's no sign of anything more serious afoot, at first, so no one catches on to what's really happening. The doctor doesn't catch the cycle of high blood sugars, and that spirals into hospitalization, often with dangerous diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) . For many, that leads to shock and panic, because it seems like a diabetes diagnosis came out of nowhere. And sadly, some don't make it. All because there may not have been enough awareness of this illness ahead of time, either in the public eye or even among the practicing general medical community. Two new new diabetes awareness campaigns created this Spring are hoping to change that. While they're two separate programs, these grassroots efforts go hand-in-hand and aim to raise the level of public knowledge about type 1 before a full-fledged onset. Behind both of them are well-known advocate and D-Dad Tom Karlya in New York, who has two kids of his own with type 1 -- and helping him with one of the campaigns is D-Mom Kim May in Amarillo, Texas, who has a son diagnosed about five years ago. The initiatives hope to not only raise the bar on recognition of T1 symptoms among the general public, but also to push for family doctors to screen for type 1 with a simple glucose test if and when any classic "flu-like" D-symptoms are seen in patients. There's actually a lot of ta Continue reading >>

Diabetics: What Were Your Symptoms Before Diagnosis?

Diabetics: What Were Your Symptoms Before Diagnosis?

Diabetics: What were your symptoms before diagnosis? I've been undergoing tests because of some health issues and one of the things my Dr. is suspicious of is diabetes. I am awaiting results right now. I know what the symptoms are according to the world of medicine but I am curious of what some of you experienced that led to your diagnosis. There is no theory of evolution. Evolution is a fact. The theory is of how it happened. "Man will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest"-Diderot I have a huge family history of Type II. So I was being tested on a regular basis for a while and just kind of let it go. Over the course of a year or so I went from 225 (and flabby) to 175, but blamed my workout for it. I was always drinking lots of water (still do) but never felt "excessive thirst", or got overly fatigued or any of the regular symptoms they run you through. One summer, I was having heart palpitations an got checked. Blood tests came back and my fasting glucose was 288. Started on an oral med (Amaryl), and controlled diet. I had some high readings this past winter - I have been a good little diabetic, but my glucose was climbing anyway, so I'm shooting Lantus now, and a pretty small dose and I'm fine again. In fact, over the past two months I've gone from 24 units/day down to 14 now. 1) Finger your...I mean prick your finger a few times a day. Learn what effect certain foods and times of day have on your readings. I'm glad to hear you're taking care of yourself. One question for you, when and if you do eat something that sends your sugar levels up, how do you feel? Do you only know it went up because of your blood sugar reading or can you tell by some physiological response? Pretty much always when you eat your blood sugar goes Continue reading >>

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