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Swollen Face Type 1 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

More Type 1 Diabetes Kids Face Dangerous Complications

More Type 1 Diabetes Kids Face Dangerous Complications

More type 1 diabetes kids face dangerous complications Diabetic ketoacidosis is life-threatening in type 1 diabetic kids, and a lack of insurance may be the cause of late diagnosis in the US. A growing number of American children and teens with type 1 diabetes are experiencing a life-threatening complication at the time of their diagnosis, a new study finds. Researchers say a lack of insurance may mean some children are getting diagnosed with type 1 late in its development, when serious complications can arise. The complication is called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which involves dangerously high blood sugar and substances in the blood called ketones. Patients with the condition can suffer long-term health damage. "DKA is characterized by hyperglycaemia [elevated blood sugar levels] and ketonaemia [elevated acid ketones], that, when not buffered by the body, will turn the blood acidic," explained one expert, Dr. Patricia Vuguin, a paediatric endocrinologist at Cohen Children's Medical Centre in New Hyde Park, New York. "Usual symptoms are vomiting, excessive thirst and urine production, as well as abdominal pain that may be severe," added Vuguin, who was not involved in the new study. "Severe DKA may lead to swelling of the brain tissue also known as cerebral oedema, which may cause headache, coma, and can lead to death." In the new study, a team led by Dr. Arleta Rewers, from the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, looked at the medical records of more than 3,400 patients younger than 18 in Colorado who were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes between 1998 and 2012. They found that 39 percent of the children had diabetic ketoacidosis at the time of their diagnosis. 55 percent increase in the rate of DKA patients What's more, there was a 55 percent increas Continue reading >>

Swollen Feet, Ankles And Hands - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

Swollen Feet, Ankles And Hands - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

Hello to everyone here. I am a type 1 diabetic (28) who was diagnosed when I was five years old. For the past three days, I have noticed that my ankles and feet, wrists and top of hands swelling considerably. On my feet and ankles the swelling is the worst. I can feel the skin tightening, and my ankles dissappear--they're still there...just buried under puffiness. I am a large but not terribly overweight person, just tall and Nordic (lol). I have seen some commentary about edema, kidney issues, and heart issues associated with this kind of swelling (God forbid it's any of those). I have never had this type of thing happen before (well, unless you count injuries from general clumsiness). My insulin usage has also skyrocketed for some reason. I check my blood sugar and take an active part in my health. My feet are in good condition--no injuries or discoloration, just nice and, er, plump, and rather uncomfortable. I can push my finger into my ankle and make a dent. Ick. Called the doctor...I go in for blood work on Monday (today being Friday)--he's great, but he is a general physician (no responsible endos in Greenville that I can see--that's another issue). Also, I have had hip problems resulting in big pain for about a year now. The swelling seems to happen when I am sitting down or when I am sleeping. What could this indicate? Please try not to be too frightening. I am so grateful that this site exists, and thanks for any help you can give. Oh--Lantus and Humalog are my meds along with Zestril 20mg. Continue reading >>

Facial Swelling: Causes, Symptoms, Treatments, And More

Facial Swelling: Causes, Symptoms, Treatments, And More

You may occasionally wake up with a swollen, puffy face. This could happen as a result of pressure being placed on your face while sleeping. However, a swollen, puffy face can also arise from a facial injury or indicate an underlying medical condition. Facial swelling doesnt just include the face, but it can also involve the neck or throat. If there are no injuries to the face, facial swelling can indicate a medical emergency. In most cases, a medical professional should treat facial swelling. Conditions that cause facial swelling, with pictures Several conditions can cause facial swelling. Here is a list of 10 possible causes. Warning: Graphic images ahead. This eye inflammation is caused by an allergic reaction to substances like pet dander, dust, pollen, or mold spores. Red, itchy, watery, puffy, and burning eyes are symptoms. These eye symptoms may occur in combination with sneezing, runny, and itchy nose. This condition is considered a medical emergency. Urgent care may be required. Mild, itchy, red rash may occur days to weeks after taking a drug Severe drug allergies can be life-threatening and symptoms include hives, racing heart, swelling, itching, and difficulty breathing Other symptoms include fever, stomach upset, and tiny purple or red dots on the skin Image by: James Heilman, MD (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 ( ) or GFDL ( )], via Wikimedia Commons This is a form of severe swelling beneath the skin's surface. It may be accompanied by hives and itching. It's caused by an allergic reaction to an allergen like food or medication. Additional symptoms may include stomach cramping and discolored patches or rash on the hands, arms, and feet. See your healthcare provider immediately if you have facial swelling. If a venomous bee sting caused the swelling, remove the st Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus & Facial Swelling: Causes & Diagnoses | Symptoma.com

Diabetes Mellitus & Facial Swelling: Causes & Diagnoses | Symptoma.com

1 diabetes , type 2 diabetes Learn More about diabetes mellitus Seen and Heard What made you want to look up diabetes mellitus ? [merriam-webster.com] With type 2 diabetes , the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. [fpnotebook.com] Diabetes mellitusType 1 vs Type 2 Finding Type 1 Type 2 % of diabetics 10% 90% Age of onset Usually 35 Usually 40 Weight Not overweight Overweight Speed of onset Often abrupt [medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] Clinically, therefore, diabetes in acromegaly resembles Type 2 Diabetes. [diapedia.org] Children with gigantism have few soft tissue effects (eg, peripheral edema, coarse facial features), because of their rapid linear growth. [emedicine.medscape.com] Diabetes mellitus appears in 20 to 40 percent of acromegalic subjects because excess growth hormone blocks the action of insulin . [britannica.com] It is characterized by upper body OBESITY; OSTEOPOROSIS; HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; HIRSUTISM; AMENORRHEA; and excess body fluid. [fpnotebook.com] The symptoms and signs are a result of the action of this hormone and include fatty swellings in the interscapular area (buffalo hump) and in the facial area (moon face), [medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] Hypertension , osteopenia, diabetes mellitus, and impaired immune function may also occur. [emedicine.medscape.com] Insipidus Syndrome of Inappropriate ADH (SIADH) Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Diabetes Mellitus Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Coma Impaired Glucose Tolerance [medbullets.com] ), impotence and sometimes swelling of the breasts [cancerresearchuk.org] . However, doctors may prescribe medications like corticosteroids , which can reduce swelling of the facial nerve, and antiviral drugs, although there isnt a lot of eviden Continue reading >>

Face Swelling In Diabetics

Face Swelling In Diabetics

marco40987 over a year ago Facial swelling in people with diabetes is really annoying. It is hard to control this, because you need to control intake of salt and water, because they are the reason for this condition. Kidneys are in charge of removing waste and excessive water from the body, however if kidneys are affected by high blood sugar levels they get damaged and are not able to do their job good. This is how you get the swelling in the face if you have diabetes. So if you have diabetes you really need to take good care of your health and you need to keep the sugar level in blood normal. If you experience this you know what you need to do. ashley111320811 over a year ago The other day I had ramen before I went to bed. Woke up the next morning with puffy eyes and face. (Its usualy for me) I hear its cause of the amount of sodium. When I usually eat salty foods, my face recovers within a day or so. However, Today I woke up and my face was still puffy. My eyes have improved tho. However, my face isnt as puffy as it was. I tried some home remidies, I dont think it worked. I Have type 1 Diabetes. and forgot to give my self insulin at some times. (a couple of days or so) Continue reading >>

Lung Cancer Symptoms: A Swollen Face Could Be A Sign Of Superior Vena Cava Obstruction | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Lung Cancer Symptoms: A Swollen Face Could Be A Sign Of Superior Vena Cava Obstruction | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Lung cancer symptoms: Have you got a swollen face? Swelling in the face can be a result of a superior vena cava obstruction Swelling in the face can be a result of a superior vena cava obstruction. The superior vena cava is a large vein in the chest which carries blood from the upper half of the body into the heart. And a superior vena cava obstruction happens when something blocks this blood flow, explains Macmillan. The British charity adds on its website: Superior vena cava obstruction is usually caused by lung cancer near to this vein. The cancer may be pressing on the been or it may have spread to the lymph nodes nearby, causing them to swell. Lung cancer symptoms: A swollen face is a result of superior cava obstruction Symptoms of lung cancer. In the early stages of the disease there are very few symptoms but here are the early warning signs you should be looking out for. Lung cancer symptoms: Superior vena cava obstruction is usually caused by lung cancer near the vein It can also be caused by a blood clot blocking the vein. This can happen if youre having treatment through a central line. Treatment may vary - a small tube can be put in the vein to keep it open, or radiotherapy or chemotherapy are also options. Lung cancer does not usually cause noticeable symptoms until it has spread through the lungs or to other parts of the body. Lung cancer symptoms: Signs do not usually become noticeable until the cancer has spread This means the outlook for the condition is not as good as other types of cancer. The NHS says: overall, about one in three people with the condition live for at least a year after theyre diagnosed and about one in 20 people live at least 10 years. However, survival rates can vary widely, depending on how far the cancer ha spread at the time of d Continue reading >>

Is Swelling Related To High Blood Sugar?

Is Swelling Related To High Blood Sugar?

Insulin is a hormone that transfers sugar from your blood to your cells. When you have insufficient amounts of insulin -- or your cells are resistant to insulin -- a you may develop high blood sugar. High blood sugar is the predominant characterization of diabetes, but it is also associated with people who have pre-diabetes. High blood sugar can lead to complications of diabetes that include conditions which involve swelling. Video of the Day Swelling, also called edema, is the enlargement of a body tissue, such as skin or an organ. A buildup of fluid in the tissue causes swelling to take place in a local area in several parts throughout your body and leads to rapid weight gain in a short period of time. Common parts of the body that can be affected include the feet, legs, gums, face, blood vessels, joints and glands. Swelling can occur when you eat too much sodium or take diabetes medications called thiazolidinediones. Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes characterized by swelling of the lenses of your eyes that is caused by damage to your blood vessels from high levels of blood sugar. Initially, you may not know you have any problems and your eyesight may appear fine. Over time, though, excessive levels of blood sugar in the capillaries that nourish your retina can cause diabetic retinopathy and vision loss. In fact, the higher the levels of blood sugar, the more likely you will damage blood vessels and develop diabetic retinopathy. High blood sugar increases your risk of an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, conditions characterized by blockage of a blood vessel supplying the brain, or bleeding into or around the brain, respectively. High blood sugar can cause more swelling associated with a stroke. Research by scientists at the Seoul Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Protecting Your Outermost Layer The phrase “feeling comfortable in your own skin” is usually used figuratively to describe a level of self-confidence or self-acceptance. But when your skin itches, hurts, flakes, breaks out, changes color, or just doesn’t look or feel the way you’d like it to, the phrase can take on a new, very literal meaning. Diabetes can affect the skin in a number of ways that can make a person feel less than comfortable. In fact, as many as a third of people with diabetes will have a skin condition at some point in their lifetime. While some conditions may appear uniquely in people with diabetes, others are simply more common in people with diabetes. The good news is that a fair number of these conditions are treatable or can be prevented by maintaining blood glucose control and taking good daily care of your skin. Dry, itchy skin Dry skin can occur as a result of high blood glucose. When the blood glucose level is high, the body attempts to remove excess glucose from the blood by increasing urination. This loss of fluid from the body causes the skin to become dry. Dry skin can also be caused by neuropathy (damage to the nerves) by affecting the nerves that control the sweat glands. In these cases, neuropathy causes a decrease or absence of sweating that may lead to dry, cracked skin. Cold, dry air and bathing in hot water can aggravate dry skin. Dryness commonly leads to other skin problems such as itching (and often scratching), cracking, and peeling. Any small breaks in the skin leave it more exposed to injury and infection. It is therefore important to keep skin well moisturized. The best way to moisturize is to apply lotion or cream right after showering and patting the skin dry. This will seal in droplets of water that are present on t Continue reading >>

Why The Swollen Face?

Why The Swollen Face?

-52-year-old woman -History of diabetes -Complaints of unilateral right-sided facial swelling that began 3 days ago. -Area is considerably painful. It hurts when she opens her mouth, chews food or swallows. -She describes an abnormal foul taste in her mouth which she noticed just before the pain started. -Says she’s had a fever but has not taken her temperature. A 52-year-old woman with a past medical history of diabetes comes to your ED with the complaint of right-sided facial swelling for three days. She states the area is painful and hurts when she opens her mouth, chews or swallows. She recalls a subjective fever but has not taken her temperature. Her temperature is 102.4 F and HR is 107 but vitals are otherwise unremarkable. Upon physical examination, the patient looks uncomfortable with a large degree of swelling over her right face/neck as pictured. It is exquisitely tender, warm and mildly erythematous. You attempt to palpate the parotid but there is a substantial amount of edema making the gland borders indistinct. The patient does not have stridor but there are a few tender posterior cervical lymph nodes. The rest of the physical is grossly unremarkable. Discussion: Working through the possible causes of facial swelling, from worst to best case scenario. Ludwig’s angina is an infection of the submandibular space. This disease can displace the swollen tongue posteriorly, potentially occluding the airway. The patient may complain of pain or drooling and will often be leaning forward in the “sniffing position” to maximize the airway patency. The best place to look to confirm this diagnosis is under the tongue in the floor of the mouth. It will appear raised up and approach the level of the occlusive surface of the teeth. Our patient’s swelling is confin Continue reading >>

Insulin Oedema In Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Insulin Oedema In Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Abstract Despite the essential role of insulin in the management of patients with insulin deficiency, insulin use can lead to adverse effects such as hypoglycaemia and weight gain. Rarely, crucial fluid retention can occur with insulin therapy, resulting in an oedematous condition. Peripheral or generalised oedema is an extremely rare complication of insulin therapy in the absence of heart, liver or renal involvement. It has been reported in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes following the initiation of insulin therapy, and in underweight patients on large doses of insulin. The oedema occurs shortly after the initiation of intensive insulin therapy. We describe two adolescent girls with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, who presented with oedema of the lower extremities approximately one week after the initiation of insulin treatment; other causes of oedema were excluded. Spontaneous recovery was observed in both patients. Conflict of interest:None declared. Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Causes Of Face Swelling

Diabetes-related Causes Of Face Swelling

Our information shows that 1 causes of Face swelling are related to diabetes, or a family history of diabetes (from a list of 73 total causes). These diseases and conditions may be more likely causes of Face swelling if the patient has diabetes, is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. Proteinuria - face swelling More Information on Diabetes All Causes of Face swelling The full list of all possible causes for Face swelling described in various sources is as follows: Drug side effect causes of Face swelling The following drugs, medications, substances or toxins may possibly cause Face swelling as a side effect. [See detailed list of 34 drug side effect causes of Face swelling] Conditions listing medical symptoms: Face swelling: The following list of conditions have 'Face swelling' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom. Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Face swelling or choose View All. Continue reading >>

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Tweet Edema (known as oedema in the UK) is a build up of fluid in the body (water retention) which causes swelling. Edema commonly affects the legs, ankles, feet and wrist. Water retention is often treatable, with treatment varying depending on the cause. Symptoms of edema The main symptom of edema is swelling of the affected area. Other symptoms that may occur, along with swelling, include: Weight gain Aching limbs Stiff joints Discolouration of skin Hypertension (high blood pressure) What causes swelling in the legs, feet and ankles? Swollen ankles and legs will often be brought on, or aggravated, by long periods of standing. A number of medications can increase the risk of oedema. Such medications include corticosteroids, blood pressure medications and the contraceptive pill. Water retention may also be caused by a number of conditions including: A high intake of salt can increase the problems of swelling in people with kidney disease. Treatment for edema Treatment for edema may vary depending on the cause. Water retention may be resolved if the underlying cause can be adequately treated. Regular physical activity and preventing long periods of standing can help reduce water retention. A low dietary salt intake is advisable, particularly if fluid retention has been brought on by kidney disease. If you are overweight, weight loss can help with reducing fluid retention. Diuretics, also known as ‘water tablets’, help to remove fluid from the body and may be prescribed for some causes of oedema. Prevention You can reduce your risk of edema by taking steps to prevent kidney disease and heart failure from developing. This can be achieved through good control of blood glucose levels, regular exercise and a healthy diet. If you can avoid long periods of standing, this wi Continue reading >>

Swelling In Face, Type 1 Diabetes Is The Trigger

Swelling In Face, Type 1 Diabetes Is The Trigger

Sometimes, the patients with type 1 Diabetes may suffer from swelling in face. How does it occur? Does it can aggravate the disease progression? If the patients have the swelling occasionally, it is may be caused by excess water intake or overwork etc. However, if it exists for too long and reoccurs frequently, the patients should pay more attention to it because it is may be related to kidney injury. Kidney injury is very common in the patients with a long history of Diabetes such as above 10 years. The capillaries in kidneys are responsible for filtering blood and discharging metabolic products. Meanwhile, the kidneys can keep the useful stuffs in blood. However, if blood sugar level is controlled poorly, it will impair the capillaries. As a result, the kidneys can not function normally and a lot of waste products build up in body and a lot of proteins leak into urine. On one hand, as proteins leak into urine, the protein level in blood will decline. Afterwards, fluid in blood vessels will immerse into subcutaneous tissue. As the tissues in face are soft, it is involved primarily. On the other hand, the kidneys can not filter fluid normally as before. As a result, they will build up in body. It is also a common cause of swelling in face. So, how to relieve it? 1. The patients with type 1 Diabetes should limit water intake properly. 2. The doctors will recommend some diuretic to relive it. 3. The patients should go for tests to find out if it is caused by kidney injury. If so, they should take proper treatment as soon as possible. If the patients with type 1 Diabetes have proteins in urine, the disease usually at least has developed into stage 3 of Diabetic Nephropathy. To prevent renal injury, the experts remind all the patients with Diabetes that they should go for r Continue reading >>

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