diabetestalk.net

Sweet Potatoes Gestational Diabetes

Food For Gestational Diabetes

Food For Gestational Diabetes

Food Substitutions: Here are a few simple substitutions that will take you a long way in controlling the sugar spikes. It is funny how food we eat can really make a difference. Much of this may sound like a sea of change if you are not used to them as change or fear of the unknown is what each one of us are afraid of. But with courage of conviction, you can overcome that. And the best part is you will get rewarded for eating right everyday by way of your blood sugar monitor numbers turning in the normal range. Substitute: whole (full fat) or 2% milk with low-fat or even better non fat milk, if you haven't already. Similarly whole (full fat) yogurt with non fat version. Even better, switch from regular / plain unsweetened yogurt to non fat unsweetened Greek Yogurt if you can. It has more protein as compared to the regular yogurt and helps keep you fuller longer and keeps your digestive tract healthy. White rice with Brown rice or cracked wheat. It might be an acquired taste for many, but once you do, you will never want to go back to white rice again. Both brown rice and cracked wheat cook similar to white rice, might take a tad bit longer. Butter with oil. Better to cut it out completely. But occasionally when you crave, hit the EVOO (extra virgin olive oil) button instead. Olive oil increases flavor of soups, pastas and sides. Brown rice or whole wheat pasta made with 100% whole grain place of regular pasta. White bread with 100% natural multi-grain or 12 grain or whole wheat bread White Basmati Rice with Brown Basmati Rice Fine cracked wheat in place of upma rava/ semolina (cream of wheat) Potatoes with Sweet Potatoes, they have a lot of fiber and are a low-glycemic index food and after digestion release glucose to the blood slowly helping keep the blood sugar stable.

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

I have gestational diabetes. Why do I have to watch what I eat? Eating well is an important way to stay healthy for all women in pregnancy. But if you have gestational diabetes (GD), choosing the right food is especially important. When you eat, your digestive system breaks most of your food down into a type of sugar called glucose. Glucose is one of your body’s main sources of energy. Glucose enters your bloodstream and then, with the help of insulin (a hormone made by your pancreas), your cells use the glucose as fuel. However, if your body doesn't produce enough insulin – or your cells have a problem responding to the insulin – too much glucose stays in your blood, instead of moving into the cells and getting converted to energy. Pregnancy hormones reduce the effect of insulin, so your body has to make more of it. If your body can't keep up with the demands for insulin, your blood sugar levels can get too high. That's when GD happens. It's important to control it, as it can lead to problems for your baby. You may be able to control GD by changing what you eat and combining a healthy diet with regular exercise. Learn all about gestational diabetes, including risk factors, symptoms to watch out for, and how it's managed. How will I have to change my diet? If you’ve been diagnosed with GD, your doctor should refer you to a dietitian who can work out a special diet for you. Every pregnancy is different, so what works for one woman may not work for you. You’ll probably need to experiment with different foods and combinations of foods before you work out what’s best for your body. Your dietitian will be able to help you with this. Women with GD say the foods they can tolerate often change as their pregnancy progresses, which can be frustrating. Others say their Continue reading >>

Why I Went Paleo/primal For My Gestational Diabetes

Why I Went Paleo/primal For My Gestational Diabetes

Why I Went Paleo/Primal for My Gestational Diabetes Ive been interested in Paleolithic (or paleo) diets for ages, but it always seemed difficult to give up my favorite croissants and ciabatta bread and fully embrace the lifestyle. Plus, I have a wheat-addicted daughter and husband to deal with.Ive tried removing wheat from the house from time to time, but it usually results in some sort of mutiny and my dear hubby making panicked runs to Costco for massive packs of apple turnovers. I found him hiding some in his car last year and decided I may have been a wee bit extreme in my war on gluten. However, I got a wake up call last year when I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GD) fairly early on in my recent pregnancy with our twins. Gestational diabetes is much more common with twin pregnancies, but the diagnosis upset me. It seemed that getting a diagnosis of gestational diabetes triggered the five stages of grief! My first step was definitely denial: How could I possibly have gestational diabetes? I eat very healthy foods overall (well at least according to conventional holistic nutrition)plenty of healthy whole grains, beans, legumes, organic vegetables, fruit, grass-fed beef, and organic chicken. Oh, and wild salmon of courseI do live in the Pacific Northwest!I also love my dark chocolate , but Im more likely to make glucomannan pudding than cupcakes. (Okay, sometimes we have cupcakes.) I was tested for gestational diabetes earlier in my pregnancy than most because of my symptoms (hyperemesis gravidarum, constant thirst, and needing to pee even more than the average pregnant woman) and the high risk of GD with twins. My test results were marginal, and it was still early, so, convinced this was all a giant mistake, I started monitoring my blood sugars four times Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Sweet Potatoes If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Sweet Potatoes If I Have Diabetes?

Many cases of diabetes, especially type 1 diabetes, come from problems with the ability of the pancreas to regulate insulin, which is important in controlling blood sugar. The pancreas-shaped sweet potato helps to balance blood sugar in diabetics. Research shows that sweet potatoes contain adiponectin, the same hormones that are released from fat cells. Adiponectin tends to improve metabolism and insulin regulation. Unlike other starchy vegetables, sweet potatoes are considered to be an “anti-diabetic food.” This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com Yes diabetics can eat sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes contain carbohydrates which can raise blood sugar levels. However if you eat the right serving size of a sweet potato you can control the amount of sugar you take in. Also what you put on the potato is important. Avoid added sugars or sweeteners. Absolutely! Sweet potatoes are perfect for any plate but especially for people with diabetes. Compared to white potatoes, sweet potatoes are lower on the glycemic index and deliver chart topping vitamin A for eye health. The fiber helps with blood glucose control and weight management and the potassium helps control blood pressure. One important note... Take care to prepare your sweet potatoes without all of the added sugar, butter or marshmallows that many recipes call for. Go beyond the norm and try sweet potatoes roasted, mashed or even pureed into soup. One sweet potato contains 26 grams of carbs, but that’s partially offset by the 4 grams of fiber. Sweet potatoes contain healthy phytochemicals, too. One idea is to eat just half a sweet potato (topped with butter rather than sugar) and pair it with a protein food. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Making lifestyle changes to follow a good gestational diabetes diet will mean achieving lower blood sugar levels which will ultimately benefit your baby hugely and reduce the risks and complications associated with gestational diabetes. But what is a good gestational diabetes diet? Our golden rules to eating The best approach to food we have found is to stick to these 8 golden rules: Eat little & often, ideally 3 meals and 3 snacks a day 'Pair' foods so that they will be tolerated better, "food pairing" is a term that we use in relation to the GD diet Eat high protein Eat good, natural fats Eat low amounts of unrefined complex starchy carbohydrates at every meal Bulk up meals with lots of vegetables & salad Drink plenty of water Go for a stroll We explain all these points in more detail below... #1. Eat little and often Ideally we want blood sugar levels which look (if we were to draw a picture) like rolling hills, rather than huge spikes and crashes. The best way to achieve good control over levels is to choose sensible foods and to eat little amounts often. We advise aiming for 3 meals and 3 snacks a day. Avoiding to eat is something that many mothers do when they are first diagnosed with gestational diabetes as they are unsure or too scared over what to eat. This can actually have a detrimental effect on blood sugar levels. If a meal or snack is missed then blood sugar levels can drop low and when this happens the liver dumps glucose into the bloodstream to give us energy and keep us going. The glucose can raise our levels high and then when eating our next meal, as levels are higher than they should be, they raise even higher. Following a big spike in levels, the body will signal the pancreas to produce insulin, but with gestational diabetes we may not be able to pr Continue reading >>

Sweet Potato Wedges Gestational Diabetes Uk

Sweet Potato Wedges Gestational Diabetes Uk

Can gestational diabetes cause stillbirth? Can Gestational Diabetes Cause Stillbirth?#TalkAboutDiabetes This week is Diabetes Week (11th - 17th June 2018) and the focus Read More We're nuts about nuts, seeds, peanut butter & nut butters! Nuts, seeds, peanut butter and nut butters are Read More Summer is here... Time for a BBQ! A BBQ (barbecue) can a be a great choice for safe Read More Gestational Diabetes Easter Happy Easter ladies, time to start planning your Gestational Diabetes Easter! To help you with Read More Gestational diabetes risk factors and future diagnosis of diabetes Gestational diabetes risk factors and future diagnosis of diabetes in both the mother and child We felt it Read More Happy Chinese New Year! Kung Hei Fat Choi! For 2018 Chinese New Year we are celebrating the year Read More Pancake Day or Shrove Tuesday Pancake Day is almost upon us (Tuesday 13th February 2018) and many ladies Read More Gestational diabetes Party food Gestational diabetes party food can be hard to try to figure out and Read More Gestational diabetes Christmas Survival Guide! Here's your ultimate survival guide to a gestational diabetes Christmas. Dedicated to all Read More Continue reading >>

Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Diabetics have to keep a close eye on their diets, in order to manage carbohydrates and limit their impact on blood glucose and insulin levels. That means high-carbohydrate foods can be problematic, but some, such as sweet potatoes, offer substantial nutritional benefits to offset their impact on blood sugar. Deciding how much or how often you can consume them is an individual decision, but sweet potatoes can certainly find a place in a diabetic meal plan. Carbs in Sweet Potatoes Any discussion of food and diabetes management should begin with the American Diabetes Association's recommendation, which is to count the grams of carbohydrates you eat in a day. The number of carbs you need is calculated based on your body weight and activity levels, but as a rule the ADA suggests aiming for a range of 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal, although some people may require fewer for optimal blood sugar control. By that reckoning, sweet potatoes pose a challenge: One large baked sweet potato provides over 37 grams of carbs, which represents most of your allowance for that meal. By that measure, incorporating a sweet potato can sharply limit what else goes onto your plate. It's Not as Bad as it Looks That being said, there are a couple of reasons sweet potatoes might not throw your meal plan off balance. First, a large sweet potato is a substantial quantity, and if you're diabetic your meal plan probably calls for a serving of no more than 1/3 cup mashed or one small potato. This brings down your total carbohydrates to a much more manageable 12 grams for a small baked sweet potato, or a shade over 19 grams for 1/3 cup boiled, mashed sweet potato. Those figures are still high, but easier to incorporate into your daily total. Also, a large portion of those total carbohydrates Continue reading >>

Sweet Potatoes And Diabetes: Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Sweet Potatoes And Diabetes: Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Diabetes is a complicated disease to handle, you always need to be careful of what you are eating and in how much quantity. As such, there are a lot of questions as to whether including a particular vegetable in the daily diet of a diabetic is safe or not. In this article, we shall explore more about the relationship between sweet potatoes and diabetes. Let us analyze and see whether including the sweet potatoes in the daily diet of a diabetic patient is healthy or not. Carbohydrates and Sweet Potatoes Let us first understand how carbohydrates are related to sweet potatoes or how much carbohydrate does this humble vegetable contain. It is known that a medium sized sweet potato contains somewhere around 25 to 26 grams of carbohydrates. Included in this is around 3.8 to 4 grams of fiber. If you take a cup and mash the sweet potatoes in the same, you will get around 58 grams of carbohydrates and around 8 grams of fiber. Read Also: Best Low Carb Snacks for Diabetics What makes the sweet potatoes healthy for a diabetes patient is the amount of dietary fiber found within the carbohydrate. This helps in stabilizing and maintaining a healthy level of blood glucose or blood sugar in a diabetic patient. Reasons Why Sweet Potatoes are Good for Diabetes Patients Following are a few reasons why sweet potato is a good vegetable option for all the diabetes patients: The natural sugar present in sweet potatoes is considered healthy as it helps in controlling the blood sugar levels in the patient’s body. This also enables the vegetable in increasing the body’s sensitivity towards the hormone insulin. Besides, sweet potatoes contain a good amount of potassium which helps the body to maintain a stable level of blood pressure. As a result, the heart- related conditions which are so com Continue reading >>

The Big Secret About Sweet Potatoes That Nobody Wants You To Know

The Big Secret About Sweet Potatoes That Nobody Wants You To Know

You and I have been lied to. I don’t know why, and I don’t even know if it’s on purpose, but it pisses me off. And here’s why I’m annoyed… As of 2014, 29 MILLION people in the US had Diabetes (type 2), and 86 MILLION people were pre-diabetic. That’s over 105 MILLION people who have problems with insulin sensitivity and blood sugar. And my dad and my mother-in-law fall into those categories – my dad’s been type 2 diabetic for over a decade, and my mother-in-law has been pre-diabetic for about the same amount of time. So this particular issue hits very close to home (literally) for me – and presumably for almost anybody in the US, since you almost certainly know a few people who are at least pre-diabetic. The Myth About Sweet Potatoes… Everyone (from doctors, to medical researchers, to even the American Diabetes Association) seems to unanimously state that sweet potatoes are unequivocally great for diabetics (please note that when I mention diabetes in this article, I’m referring to type 2 diabetes). If you don’t believe me, here are just a few examples: And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Even on websites that supposedly pay attention to blood-sugar and glycemic load issues, sweet potatoes are almost always classified as a “better” food than things like white potatoes. Unfortunately…It’s All Completely Untrue! Listen. I’m not bashing sweet potatoes. Entire cultures have lived very healthily on sweet potatoes. I eat sweet potatoes myself. But I also have pretty good insulin sensitivity. It’s like this. Fish is pretty darn nutritious, and almost everybody agrees. But if you’re allergic to fish, you shouldn’t be eating it. It’s pretty simple. So the question is whether sweet potatoes are a problem for people with blood sugar Continue reading >>

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Note From Mommypotamus: When I wrote about natural alternatives to the glucola test, many of you asked what to do if gestational diabetes is diagnosed and confirmed. Today I am so excited to welcome Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, CLT, a registered nutritionist and gestational diabetes educator, who will be filling us in on how to take a real food approach to GD. Lily is the author of Real Food for Gestational Diabetes, a thoroughly researched guide filled with practical guidance and easy-to-follow instructions. It is, hands down, the best resource on the subject that I have found so far. If you or someone you know is looking for information on managing GD with real food, I highly recommend it! Gestational diabetes is never part of any mom’s plan . . . But it is the most common complication of pregnancy, affecting up to 18% of pregnant women. Yet there are many misconceptions about this diagnosis, both in conventional health care and the integrative medicine world. As a registered dietician/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator who specializes in gestational diabetes, I’m going to clear up some of the confusion for you today. Whether or not you have gestational diabetes, this post will help you understand how it develops and why it’s important to maintain normal blood sugar (for all pregnant women, really). I’ll also be sharing why the typical gestational diabetes diet fails and why a real food, nutrient-dense, lower carbohydrate approach is ideal for managing gestational diabetes. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is usually defined as diabetes that develops or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. However, it can also be defined as “insulin resistance” or “carbohydrate intolerance” during pregnancy. I prefer to rely on the latter descrip Continue reading >>

Sweet Potatoes A Diabetic Superfood

Sweet Potatoes A Diabetic Superfood

Sweet potatoes are considered a superfood for diabetics, says the American Diabetes Association (AMA). They have been shown to stabilise blood-sugar levels by lowering insulin resistance. They contain a high amount of fibre, which also helps to reduce levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol in the body. Other superfoods for diabetics: The AMA also recommends beans, green leafy vegies, salmon, tomatoes, berries, citrus fruits and nuts for helping to manage diabetes. 02:42AMHint: one bowl of pasta won't lead to weight gain. 11:42PMA dietitian weighs in on whether an apple a day can really help keep the doctor away. 01:43AMFrom Japanese to modern Australian, we asked a dietitian what we should be eating. 12:34AMNew York Times bestseller Dr Steven Gundry has created a whole new way of eating that's meant to help the gut, reduce weight and reverse disease. 02:07AMFrom Carmen's porriage to good old Weet-Bix. 03:32AMMost of us use it to season... well... every thing. But it's time to pass on the salt. 12:22AMYour skills are about to be fine-tuned. 02:11AMShes already won the genetic lottery, so why not indulge? 11:25PMBecause you dont get enough sleep, your hormones (and diet) go haywire. Here's what you should eat to catch those zzz's. 02:31AMFor those times a few becomes a bunch. Continue reading >>

Eating Potatoes Linked To Gestational Diabetes

Eating Potatoes Linked To Gestational Diabetes

A new study suggests that eating potatoes before you get pregnant or when trying to conceive is linked with a higher chance of gestational diabetes. Doesn't the list of what you should and shouldn't consume during, and even before, pregnancy seems so long? Well, you might want to add another food to the list: the seemingly harmless potato. In a recent study published in The BMJ, researchers found a connection between eating the starchy veggie pre-pregnancy and a greater risk for gestational diabetes (GD) while expecting. Potato, potato? Researchers looked at more than 15,000 women who became pregnant over a ten-year period. Through self-reported surveys, the scientists tracked the women's food intake and compared it with which ones were diagnosed with gestational diabetes (also called gestational diabetes mellitus, or GDM), a condition marked by high blood sugar, during pregnancy. They found that the women who ate more potatoes, including baked, boiled, mashed and fried, had a higher rate of gestational diabetes during pregnancy—even after they took into account other factors like weight and overall diet quality. "Pre-pregnancy potato consumption was significantly and positively associated with the risk of GDM," the study's senior author Cuilin Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., a senior investigator at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), tells Fit Pregnancy. This is the first study to look at potatoes' effect on the development of GDM. Although it didn't identify a specific threshold over which it's unhealthy to eat potatoes, "our data indicated that the more potato women consumed before pregnancy, the greater their risk," Dr. Zhang says. "In particular, consuming five or more than five servings per week was related to more t Continue reading >>

Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Sweet potatoes are a good food choice for diabetics as they are high in fiber and have a low glycemic index. Foods with a low glycemic index have less of an immediate impact on blood glucose levels, and therefore can help diabetics control their blood sugar. The method used to cook sweet potatoes will affect their glycemic index; certain cooking methods spike the glycemic index of sweet potatoes and render them less desirable for diabetics. Video of the Day The Glycemic Index The glycemic index measures how carbohydrates affect blood sugar. The system was developed by University of Toronto professor Dr. David J. Jenkins in an effort to determine which food best serves the needs of diabetics. The index tracks the rate at which carbohydrates are absorbed into the blood after digestion. The lower the glycemic index of a food, the better it is for diabetics, since it can help them avoid high blood sugar levels and possible diabetes complications. Sweet potatoes have a glycemic index of 44 – foods considered low on the glycemic index are 55 and less – so they are good for diabetics. Caiapo is the extract of a Japanese-grown white variety of sweet potato that is sold as a treatment for diabetes in that country. According to a 2004 study led by University of Vienna associate professor Dr. Berhhard Ludvik and published in the journal “Diabetes Care,” type 2 diabetic patients treated with caiapo saw significant decreases in fasting blood glucose levels and overall improvement in glucose control. The researchers concluded that the white sweet potato extract caiapo is good for diabetics as it can help them manage their condition. Sweet potatoes are also good for diabetics because they contain a good deal of fiber, particularly when the skins are left on. The amount of fibe Continue reading >>

Top 10 Foods For Diabetes And Pregnancy

Top 10 Foods For Diabetes And Pregnancy

Guest post by Regina M. Shirley RD, LDN of Serving Up Diabetes There are a lot of food lists out there: Top 10 Superfoods for Health, Top 10 Foods to fight Cancer, and many more. As someone with diabetes, there are also a lot of lists we can abide by: the low glycemic index list of foods, foods under 100 calories, low-carb foods, etc. Go ask any dietitian, and we will tell you to eat a balanced diet that contains a food item from each food group at most every meal, with healthy snacks in between. This is a general guideline, and most Americans don’t have enough hours in the day to incorporate all the right food groups into their daily eating plan. I used to be one of those, call me a bit of a hypocrite, but as much as I tell people that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, I was just a coffee girl in the morning, maybe with an English muffin thrown in there or a healthy nut bar. While planning for my pregnancy, I decided I needed to revamp my diet a bit to make sure that I would give my baby the best chance at developing strong organs in the first trimester. I did a lot of reading, and implemented what I already knew as well, and created my own “Top 10” list for baby and me. Here is a list of foods that I have incorporated in my diet that pack the most vitamins and nutrients (folic acid, iron and calcium are of most importance), and are even low on the glycemic index list (helpful for the blood sugars) so are also idea for people with diabetes in general. Eggs – 1-2 eggs per day in the form of hard boiled, scrambled, or in an egg and cheese whole-grain sandwich that I made myself. I buy the cage-free farm fresh eggs from my local farm. Many people think that whole eggs are bad for you because of the cholesterol in the yolk, and that egg whites are al Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Gestational Diabetes

Healthy Eating For Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes (GDM) occurs when glucose levels in the blood are higher than usual during pregnancy. This can put the health of you and your baby at risk. Healthy eating specific for GDM can help achieve good blood glucose control and healthy weight gain for mother and baby during pregnancy. Carbohydrates ï‚· Carbohydrate is found in a variety of food and drink and provides the body with fuel (energy) ï‚· Many foods containing carbohydrate also provide fibre, vitamins and minerals ï‚· Carbohydrate breaks down into glucose during digestion and is absorbed into the blood stream ï‚· The type and quantity of carbohydrate you eat will affect your blood glucose levels Which Foods Contain Carbohydrates? Healthy Carbohydrate Choices Less Healthy Carbohydrate Choices  Wholegrain Bread  Wholegrain Breakfast Cereal  Grains e.g. Barley, Quinoa  Pasta, Noodles  Rice  Wholegrain & Wholemeal Flour  Lentils and Legumes  Starchy Vegetables - Potato, Sweet Potato, Corn  Fruit  Milk, Yoghurt ï¶ Biscuits ï¶ Cakes, Pastry ï¶ Sugar, Jam ï¶ Honey, Maple Syrup ï¶ Chocolate, Confectionary ï¶ Regular Soft Drink, Cordial ï¶ Fruit Juice ï¶ Potato Crisps, Corn Chips ï¶ Ice-cream, Custard Glycaemic Index Glycaemic Index (GI) is a measure of how quickly or slowly a carbohydrate food is digested and increases blood glucose levels. Higher GI Carbohydrates Increase blood glucose levels more quickly Choose these less often Lower GI Carbohydrates Increase blood glucose levels more slowly These are the preferred choice Summary of Lower and Higher Glycaemic Index Choices Remember that both the GI and the quantity of carbohydrate foods consumed will affect your blood glucose levels. Lower GI choices are prefer Continue reading >>

More in diabetes