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Support Groups For Diabetes Type 2

Type 2 Diabetes - Finding Help And Support - Nhs.uk

Type 2 Diabetes - Finding Help And Support - Nhs.uk

There is a lot of information and support available for type 2 diabetes. Some of the support depends on the area you live in. Take a course to help you manage your diabetes There are free education courses to help you learn more about and manage your type 2 diabetes. Your GP will need to refer you, but you can phone your GP surgery to get a referral letter, so you don't need to make an appointment. Read more information about education courses for type 2 diabetes . If you're taking insulin for your type 2 diabetes, you will need to tell DVLA . This is because of the risk of low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) . You can be fined if you don't tell DVLA. The charity Diabetes UK runs local support groups . These can help with things like managing your diabetes on a daily basis, diet, exercise or dealing with emotional problems, such as depression. They offer a place to talk and find out how others live with the condition. Diabetes.co.uk forum discussions about living with and managing diabetes Diabetes UK blogs a collection of blogs on work and diabetes, food, eyes and more Diabetes Chat scheduled chats with healthcare professionals or just the chance to talk to others It can be difficult to tell others you have diabetes, but it can help for certain people to know: family can support you especially as you will need to make changes to what you eat it's important your colleagues or employer know in case of an emergency being diagnosed with diabetes can affect your mood telling your partner will help them understand how you feel Some people choose to wear a special wristband or carry something in their wallet that says they have diabetes, in case of an emergency. If it's known that you have diabetes, this can make a difference to the treatment you'll receive. Search the internet Continue reading >>

Finding The Right Diabetes Support Groups

Finding The Right Diabetes Support Groups

Sometimes a person with diabetes can feel very alone and “different.” Support groups are important and helpful to people with diabetes, because they provide a venue to meet others who share similar medical and psychosocial concerns, according to Marilyn Ritholz, Ph.D., Licensed Staff Psychologist, at Joslin Diabetes Center. By meeting with others who have diabetes, you can feel that the members of the group can understand your experience firsthand. By sharing their experiences, group members can feel part of a community and gain a greater sense of value and power from this feeling of belonging. Diabetes Support Groups at Joslin Joslin offers different types of diabetes support groups. Some of these groups include: Women’s Diabetes Support Group- “We have found that women of different ages are facing specific issues. Therefore, the group provides a venue for discussion of particular concerns for women with diabetes,” Ritholz says. For example, Joslin is now running a women’s group for ages 21-35 years old that have type 1 diabetes and are facing concerns regarding diabetes management, acceptance of diabetes, relationships, and consideration of pregnancy. Couples Support Group- These groups only meet once and have couples share concerns and discuss what it’s like to live with diabetes in a relationship. “Both the person with diabetes and the significant other get support and understanding of diabetes from different perspectives.” Joslin offers other diabetes support groups, such as coping with diabetes, men’s age-based support groups, young and middle-aged women’s diabetes support group, and a Latino support group. There are also support groups available for children with diabetes and their parents. Each program includes supervised group activities f Continue reading >>

Connect With A Diabetes Support Group

Connect With A Diabetes Support Group

If you have diabetes, getting support is very important because the disease is not only physical but comes with a lot of psychological pressure which may be very difficult to resolve alone and could make us give up easily. Support is based on the idea that those who live with chronic illnesses can share experiences amongst themselves. You can build collective trust knowing that members of the support group have firsthand understanding of the diabetic condition. Being part of the community and collectively dealing with challenges, gives you strength, value and a greater sense of belonging. There are diabetes support groups all over the United States. Below are just a few of these groups which will expose you to relevant individuals who will assist in resolving any challenges you could encounter about diabetes: The DiabetesSisters group also referred to as Sister Match, was created by Brandy Barnes. It connects people with diabetes. The group accommodates women who are 18 years of age and above living with any type of diabetes. The organization was 12,000 members and offers both online and in-person programs, such as online forums, articles, webinars, National Conferences, Leadership Institute, and monthly peer support meetups throughout the United States. TuDiabetes.org created by Manny Hernandez in 2002, provides an online forum for both men and women living with diabetes. It is a California-based non-profit organization that accommodates people with type 1, type 2, as well as gestational diabetes. It is an extension of Beyond Type 1. Free diabetes support group meetings are scheduled for an hour every month. The group provides education as well as support to individual members. The Diabetes Education Center at Jackson County Regional Health Center is located in Maquok Continue reading >>

How To Find Diabetes Support Groups

How To Find Diabetes Support Groups

Diabetics need information and support, and groups offer both.(ISTOCKPHOTO)Joining a community of people with diabeteseither an online or in-person versioncan provide you with a rich source of encouragement and information. Members can help you solve problems, suggest questions for your next doctor's visit, and get you through tough times. Paul Shirley felt better after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in December 2006. For years he'd been battling sinus infections and fatigue, which he now knows were issues related to the diabetes. He changed his diet and started taking medication. Then he aggravated an old shoulder injury, which required surgery and physical therapy. He started feeling terrible again and had difficulty controlling his blood sugar. Use These Sites to Find Diabetes Doctors and Health-Care Providers The 56-year-old Easley, S.C., resident wondered if it could be related to his injury. So he asked the members of a diabetes-related email group. Of course, they said: Being sick or injured can throw off your blood sugar. "You can't go to your doctor or even your diabetes educator every time you have a question. But you can go on this list, and people are glad to talk to you about it," he says. Although the support group members aren't experts, their "friendly, experienced" advice is sometimes all the help he needs. Shirley, who's working on his doctorate in psychology, notes that some people in online groups may argue or push unwanted advice on you. In that case, it's best to ignore them or privately email the moderator, the person responsible for maintaining order on the discussion board or email list. To find an online discussion board or email list, check out the American Diabetes Association , dLife , or Diabetes Talkfest . Next Page: Get your questi Continue reading >>

Finding A Support Group For Type 2 Diabetes

Finding A Support Group For Type 2 Diabetes

After getting a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, you may be spurred to make important lifestyle changes. But these changes often don’t happen overnight, and enthusiasm for eating healthier, getting regular activity, and monitoring your blood sugar can be difficult to maintain over the long term. Finding and sticking with a support group can keep you engaged and motivated. According to the National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support published in Diabetes Care in January 2013, on average, those initial health improvements people often make begin to diminish within six months if a person doesn’t have ongoing self-management support. But people with type 2 diabetes who attend support group meetings are better able to sustain or even build on their health improvements, according to a study published in the January 2012 issue of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. The Benefits of Outside Support Family and friends are often the first line of diabetes support — and they can provide quite a bit, says Susan Gustavsson, RN, BSN, CDE, a diabetes nurse educator who leads diabetes support groups at the Center for Endocrinology at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. However, Gustavsson says many people with type 2 diabetes often find that it's more helpful to talk with others personally dealing with the condition. “A diabetes support group can provide a place to go to discuss issues that others with the condition may be experiencing too,” she says. “It can help the person with diabetes realize that he or she is not alone.” There are several factors to consider when looking for a support group, Gustavsson says. Do you want a group that provides speakers or a traditional group with a facilitator who leads the discussion? You might want a support Continue reading >>

Support Groups | Diabetes Victoria

Support Groups | Diabetes Victoria

Join us Media About us Contact us Online help Support groups bring together people who share common experiences, conditions, concerns, goals or interests. They offer people an opportunity to improve their quality of life through mutual support and education. They can also bring about change for themselves and the wider community. The peer support program is a service offered by Diabetes Victoria to facilitate and empower all members of diabetes support groups. The program: Provides information to members and the general public about Diabetes Victoria. Facilitates and coordinates community education forums in metropolitan Melbourne, regional and rural areas. Works with health care professionals including dietitians, podiatrists and diabetes educators to raise awareness of diabetes complications and management. Advocates for change and better lifestyle options through community support and education. Diabetes Victoria provides insurance, small annual grants and ongoing support and resources to all peer support groups. In return, peer support groups provide their local communities with safe and friendly environments to meet and support other community members living with diabetes, while helping to raise awareness and funds for Diabetes Victoria in their local communities. We have both type 1 and type 2 specific peer support groups. Sharing experiences is a powerful way of learning how to manage diabetes. Meeting other people with diabetes can help reduce the... Continue reading >>

Joining A Support Group Improves Diabetes Treatment

Joining A Support Group Improves Diabetes Treatment

Joining a Support Group Improves Diabetes Treatment Patients who find a support group that "fits" are more likely to take their insulin or other diabetes medication over the long-term. Taking diabetes medicine on schedule, whether injecting insulin or swallowing a pill, can be annoying, and sometimes difficult. You know taking your diabetes mediation consistently means good news for your blood sugar, but follow up can be a problem as life gets in the way. Your doctor has probably nagged when havent been able to stick to your schedule for a dozen different reasons. Now there is something to make its easier and more likely that you can do better. Based on findings of a study presented at the World Congress on Insulin Resistance, Diabetes & Cardiovascular Disease in Universal City, California, when you join a support programone that you ''click'' withit can help you manage your medication routine much better.1 It may also help you improve your diet, exercise and other behaviors that impact your diabetes management. And, you probably don't even need to leave home. In this study,1 men and women who were enrolled in an online support program were nearly twice as likely to take their medication as prescribed and less likely to discontinue it, says Timothy Reid, MD, a family medicine physician from Janesville, Wisconsin and senior author of the poster who presented the results of the study. Joining a support group assures better long-term care for people with diabetes. Dr. Reid examined the impact of a program called COACH on patients taking Toujeo insulin, but he says many other programs are offered to patients depending upon their needs and in all cases the support works, and not just for the medicine in the study.1 The idea, Dr. Reid says, is that patients who feel supporte Continue reading >>

Group Support Tips For People With Diabetes

Group Support Tips For People With Diabetes

Find a Health Buddy Lori Bohall knew for years that she had insulin resistance. But that meant little to her until last year, when she began regaining weight she'd lost. Her feet ached, and she sank into depression. Her doctor said she had type 2 diabetes. An invitation from her health coach to join a diabetes class was the wake-up call Lori needed. The class provided a wealth of information, and she was inspired by others who talked openly about their experiences with diabetes. "Learning from others who have had success with managing their diabetes made me want to come on board and really get in the game," says Lori, 43, of Indianapolis. Lori also began to feel as if she owed it to the group to do her best at managing her health. "I find myself thinking about my class buddies as I work on my program each day," she says. "Knowing they are doing all it takes to be healthy inspires me." She's even made new friends through the group, including a walking buddy. It Takes a Village Getting together with other people with diabetes (PWDs) can make a big difference in how well you take care of yourself. Studies have shown that people who participate in activities with others have better control of blood sugars, better quality of life, and less depression than patients who don't. "The research about diabetes, and chronic illness in general, clearly indicates that support from others enhances self-care," says John Zrebiec, M.S.W., CDE, a clinical social worker at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and a member of the Diabetic Living editorial advisory board. "Likely that is just a natural human response to being able to share the burden." Participating in a support group can help you: Feel connected. Identifying with a group relieves the feeling of isolation that often comes wit Continue reading >>

Looking For Information And Support For Type 2 Diabetes

Looking For Information And Support For Type 2 Diabetes

Looking for information and support for type 2 diabetes Previous Topic | Care and treatment for type 2 diabetes Food, eating and diets | Next Topic Looking for information and support for type 2 diabetes Information about diabetes came from a variety of sources including hospital consultants and nurses, GPs, practice nurses who ran diabetes clinics, dietitians, friends and relatives, support groups, radio and television, books, leaflets and the internet. Several people emphasised the usefulness of talking to others with diabetes and sharing experiences. Paul is an aircraft engineer and is married with 4 grown-up children aged 34, 32, 27 and 25 years. Ethnic background/Nationality: British. What about information. Where do you get your information about diabetes from? Because it is quite useful to have? Internet. If you look probably in your local paper, you'll be a diabetic meeting. It is worth going along, to one of them. Or whatever, going along to many. Because there are loads of people there with diabetes at different levels and it's nice to have a chat to people who are at different levels, and how much it's affected their lives and what they do to control it. And how they have sort of sorted out and that's the best ways you will get it. Doctors can't tell you too much, because the doctors haven't got too much experience of it, unless they are a diabetic themselves. You go to diabetic nurses, they are trained, but they are only trained to a certain level. They can't, if you haven't got experience in that sort of case or whatever it is, then you won't get any sort of information on it. You've got to go and talk to a person who has got it. And you'll find if you, if you do go to a diabetic meeting it will open your eyes a lot. How it's affected people's lives. And h Continue reading >>

Diabetes Support

Diabetes Support

We provide healthcare, education and support services for those at-risk for diabetes and living with diabetes and their families. Any individual diagnosed with diabetes is automatically eligible to be a part of North Country HealthCare’s diabetes collaborative and diabetes care program. What is Diabetes? Diabetes occurs when a person has too much glucose (or sugar) in their bloodstream and not enough insulin to bring the amount of sugar down to a healthy level for their body. There are four types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes occurs in childhood and happens when the body does not produce insulin. Type 2 or adult-onset diabetes usually occurs in adults and occurs when insulin production slows and/or the body is not able to use the insulin it produced. Prediabetes is diagnosed when sugar levels are higher than normal, but not as high as in diabetes. Gestational diabetes happens during pregnancy when a woman’s body is unable to produce enough insulin or becomes insulin resistant, which results in high blood sugar. Gestational diabetes can be dangerous for the mother and the infant, both during pregnancy and after birth. Education & Group Classes Diabetes education and self-management empowers a person to take control of their diabetes care and needs. We provide education, group classes, support groups and curriculum to give patients the tools they need to achieve health and wellness while managing diabetes. Diabetes in Pregnancy Class The Diabetes in Pregnancy class offers education to prevent, manage, and reduce complications of diabetes, as well as how to maintain a healthy pregnancy. Classes include a prenatal check with a family nurse practitioner and information about your health, your baby’s health, physical activity, healthy diet habits and much more. Your prov Continue reading >>

Where To Find More Diabetes Resources

Where To Find More Diabetes Resources

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. It is not known if XIAFLEX® is safe and effective in children under the age of 18. Do not receive XIAFLEX® if you have had an allergic reaction to collagenase clostridium histolyticum or any of the ingredients in XIAFLEX®, or to any other collagenase product. See the end of the Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in XIAFLEX®. Tendon rupture or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX® may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get numbness, tingling, increased pain, or tears in the skin (laceration) in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX® because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX®: Increased chance of bleeding. Bleeding or bruising at the injection site can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have a problem with your blood clotting. XIAFLEX® may not be right for you. Before receiving XIAFLEX®, tell your healthcare provider if you have had an allergic reaction to a previous XIAFLEX® inject Continue reading >>

An Effective Type 2 Diabetes Support Group

An Effective Type 2 Diabetes Support Group

Don't attempt to convert people who are sure their doctor is giving them all the care they need. Look for people who are concerned about their poor blood sugars and know that they need help in improving them. Don't debate people who aren't interested. Just mention that you're holding a support group using some new techniques for blood sugar control that have been very effective. As people in your group succeed, a ripple effect will reach others who might not be interested at the outset. Don't Identify the Group with any Specific Dietary Approach Make it clear that no one will be told that they have to eat some specific diet. Stress the group's approach is to help people learn what it is that raises their own particular blood sugar so they can find a way of eating that works to avoid damaging spikes. Tell people the only diet you are interested in is a "low spike diet"--one that avoids blood sugar spikes. By avoiding the "diet wars" you eliminate the number one reason most people with diabetes turn off to support groups. Make it clear that you are selling nothing at your meetings and that the group's philosophy includes the idea that no one will ever tell another person what they should do. Avoid having anyone take a strong leadership role. Let the facts do the talking. Let people share what has worked for them and information that they have found useful, but don't let anyone tell anyone else in the group what they must do. The job of the group leader is to coordinate the meetings and as the group grows, link up new people with experienced people who act as sponsors and give them one-on-one support outside of the meeting structure if needed. Hold your meetings at an interval that works for you and other members. Once a week would be great, but even once a month can work Continue reading >>

4 Ways Type 2 Diabetes Support Groups Can Change Your Life

4 Ways Type 2 Diabetes Support Groups Can Change Your Life

When youre living with type 2 diabetes , you know how important it is to check your blood sugar , eat the right foods , and stay active. Butbeing aware of these actions and actually doing them consistently can be two very different things. This is where a diabetes support group can go a long way toward successfully managing your diabetes. Connecting with other people who have diabetes can help you stay motivated to take care of yourself by offering both practical and personal support. According to a study published in the January 2012 issue of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice , people with type 2 diabetes who attend support groups are more successful at maintaining or even improving their health. Here are just a few of the benefits diabetes support groups offer: Its common for people living with diabetes to feel isolated, especially if you've been recently diagnosed or dont have any family or friends with the disease . A diabetes support group can help you realize youre far from alone. Youll meet an entire group of people who understand what you're going through and are happy to offer guidance and encouragement. 2. Practical Advice Makes Managing Blood Sugar Easier Support groups can provide a wealth of information and ideas on ways to make managing diabetes easier, such as diabetes-friendly recipes the whole family can enjoy, tips for eating right at holiday parties and work events, and local resources for people with diabetes. Plus, you may meet new friends to exercise and do other activities with. 3. Personal Connection Is What Makes Diabetes Support Groups So Effective When you're living with diabetes, taking care of yourself is a priority. If you are caring for a family, have a demanding job, or have other responsibilities, you may feel overwhelmed at times Continue reading >>

Support Group

Support Group

Type 1 Diabetes Support Group – Meets the second Saturday of each month @ 10:00 a.m. in the Resource Center located in the Diabetes Education Center. Blaine Hellman is the Type 1 Group Leader – CALL TO REGISTER, (402) 399-0777 ext. 230 Type 2 Diabetes Support Group – Temporarily suspended at this time. Please check back soon for more information or contact our Education Center at (402) 399-0777 Ext. 230. If you are interested in leading our Type 2 support group please give us a call at (402) 399-0777 ext. 230. Continue reading >>

Support Groups - Lancaster General Health

Support Groups - Lancaster General Health

Lancaster General Health offers people with diabetes and pre-diabetes a full spectrum of resources for mind, body and spirit. Support groups and classes provide information, motivation and emotional support for diabetes patients of all ages. Diabetes support groups are free, and pre-registration is not requiredso join and share! This support group welcomes people of all ages who are interested in support and education about Type 2 diabetes. Date: Meets on the third Monday of each month Place: 3rd Floor Conference Room in the Suburban Outpatient Pavilion, 2100 Harrisburg Pike For more info: If you are attending for the first time, please call Shirley Rineer at 717-786-2503 or to confirm the meeting time and location. This support group welcomes women who seek information and emotional support for managing and coping with Type 1, or insulin-dependent, diabetes. Date: Meets on the first Wednesday of select months. Check for upcoming dates . Place: 3rd Floor Conference Room in the Suburban Outpatient Pavilion, 2100 Harrisburg Pike For more info: Please call -888-LGH-INFO (544-4636). Continue reading >>

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