diabetestalk.net

Sugar Free Wine For Diabetics

Some Words About Alcohol

Some Words About Alcohol

SOME WORDS ABOUT ALCOHOL Alcohol can provide calories, or energy, without directly raising blood sugar, but if you’re an insulin-dependent diabetic, you need to be cautious about drinking. Ethyl alcohol, which is the active ingredient in hard liquor, beer, and wine, has no direct effect on blood sugar because the body does not convert it into glucose. In the case of distilled spirits and very dry wine, the alcohol generally isn’t accompanied by enough carbohydrate to affect your blood sugar very much. For example, 100 proof gin has 83 calories per ounce. These extra calories can increase your weight slightly, but not your blood sugar. Different beers—ales, stouts, and lagers—can have varying amounts of carbohydrate, which is slow enough in its action that if you figure it into your meal plan, it may not raise your blood sugar. Mixed drinks and dessert wines can be loaded with sugar, so they’re best avoided. Exceptions would be a dry martini or mixed drinks that can be made with a sugar-free mixer, such as sugar-free tonic water. Ethyl alcohol, however, can indirectly lower the blood sugars of some diabetics if consumed at the time of a meal. It does this by partially paralyzing the liver and thereby inhibiting gluconeogenesis so that it can’t convert all the protein of the meal into glucose. For the average adult, this appears to be a significant effect with doses greater than 1.5 ounces of distilled spirits, or one standard shot glass. If you have two 1.5-ounce servings of gin with a meal, your liver’s ability to convert protein into glucose may be impaired. If you’re insulin- dependent and your calculation of how much insulin you’ll require to cover your meal is based on, say, two hot dogs, and those hot dogs don’t get 7.5 percent converted to gluc Continue reading >>

Berry Wine Could Help Diabetics Control Their Blood Sugar Levels

Berry Wine Could Help Diabetics Control Their Blood Sugar Levels

Compounds in blackberry wine were found to inhibit an enzyme involved in absorbing carbohydrates A drink made from berry wine could help diabetics cope with their condition, say researchers. People with type 2 diabetes struggle to control their blood sugar levels as their bodies do not produce enough insulin. As a result they must be careful how many carbohydrate-rich foods they eat as the body turns them into glucose, making blood sugar levels rise. Now a study from the University of Illinois, has found that compounds found in both blueberry and blackberry wines inhibit two enzymes that are involved in the body's absorption of carbohydrates. The team said lab tests revealed a blueberry-blackberry blend of wine inhibited the carb-degrading enzymes, known as alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase, almost as much as an anti-diabetes drug. They now hope to create a non-alcoholic fermented fruit drink that keeps blood sugar levels low but also contains anti-inflammatory compounds found in the original wine. In a second study, graduate Michelle Johnson measured the antioxidant, polyphenol, and anthocyanin levels in blueberry and blackberry wines. Her proposed blend contains an abundance of these bioactive compounds, which add to its healthful properties. The researchers are particularly interested in the ability of anthocyanins to reduce inflammation, which contributes to the development of many chronic illnesses, including cancer, metabolic disease, and cardiovascular disease. To that end, they are experimenting with the berries’ effects on inflammatory cells, and they have found that anthocyanins reduce markers associated with the inflammatory response. 'Preliminary studies have indicated that anthocyanins may have a positive effect on cognition and overall brain health whi Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017: The Best Sugar-free Treats

World Diabetes Day 2017: The Best Sugar-free Treats

Thinking of cutting back on sugar? It’s not as hard as you think, thanks to an impressive variety of treats made with natural sweeteners. Here’s our selection of guilt-free goodies. Sweet Virtues Halo Thins Gift Box Sweet Virtues is known for creating cocoa-rich treats that are free from added sweeteners, additives and preservatives. These refined disks of organic chocolate not only taste great, but are also seriously good for you. They come in a selection of restorative flavours including White Tea and Peppermint, Himalayan Pink Salt and Maqui. £15.95, Ocado, Buy it now Lola’s Cupcakes in Chocolate Sugar Free Thanks to this guilt-free creation from Lola's, the sugar-free gang can have their cake and eat it too. Sweetened with xylitol and agave nectar, this cocoa-flavoured sponge is topped with scrumptious buttercream frosting and finished with a sprinkle of chocolate flakes. £3.25, Lola's Cupcakes, Buy it now Goody Good Stuff Cheery Cherries If chewy sweets are your thing, then Goody Good Stuff has got you covered. These cherry-shaped treats are made with only natural ingredients and are also free from gluten, fat and dairy. £0.74, Holland & Barrrett, Buy it now Sweet Freedom Choc Shot One for chocoholics, this liquid treat can be enjoyed in hot milk, on toast, yoghurt and lots more. It has a low GI, so is ideal for diabetics, and contains half the calories of Nutella. £3.55, Waitrose, Buy it now Free’ist Choc Chip Cookies No sugar certainly doesn't have to mean no cookies. Loaded with delicious chocolate chips, these crunchy snacks are made with no added sugar, preservatives or colourings and go perfectly with a midday cuppa. £1.75, Holland & Barrett, Buy it now Perfect World Carrot Cake Ice Cream Perfect World has rustled up some nutritious ice cream for Continue reading >>

Glass Of Red Wine A Night Could Help People With Diabetes Manage Cholesterol And Protect Their Hearts, Says Study

Glass Of Red Wine A Night Could Help People With Diabetes Manage Cholesterol And Protect Their Hearts, Says Study

INDYPULSE Glass of red wine a night could help people with diabetes manage cholesterol and protect their hearts, says study Drinking a glass of red wine every night may help people with diabetes to manage their cholesterol and protect their hearts, a new study has found. In a trial of more than 220 type 2 diabetes patients assigned a standard Mediterranean diet, those who were also allowed one 150ml glass of red with dinner ended up with higher levels of so-called ‘good cholesterol’ than those who drank white wine or mineral water. People with diabetes are more vulnerable to developing heart disease than the general population. They often have low levels of good cholesterol, or HDL, which helps remove ‘bad cholesterol’, or LDL, and is thought to protect improve heart health, possibly protecting against heart attacks and strokes. In the study, which was carried out over the course of two years, people who drank red wine saw “modest” increases in HDL. Those who drank either wine and were genetically predisposed to metabolise alcohol well also had better blood sugar control. The Israeli researchers behind the study said that genetic profiling could be used to identify type 2 diabetes patients who might benefit from moderate wine-drinking. Research into the health benefits – or lack thereof – of red wine remains controversial territory. Numerous studies in recent years have linked moderate consumption with lower levels of bad cholesterol and better heart health, and it has even been suggested as an explanation for the so-called ‘French paradox’ – the fact the country has low heart disease rates, despite rich diets heavy in cheese and red meat. It is thought that the effect may be caused by an, as yet unidentified, ingredient of red wine – a theory ba Continue reading >>

Fitting Alcohol Into Your Meal Plan

Fitting Alcohol Into Your Meal Plan

The use of alcohol should be discussed with your physician and healthcare team. As a general guideline, for persons using insulin, two alcoholic beverages may be used in addition to their regular meal plan. No food should be omitted in exchange for an alcoholic drink. For persons who are not on insulin and are watching their weight, alcohol is best substituted for fat choices and in some cases extra bread/starch choices. Some alcoholic beverages contain higher amounts of sugar and carbohydrate — these include sweet wines, sweet vermouth and wine coolers. Use these sparingly as they may increase your blood glucose levels too much. Additional guidelines for the use of alcohol are printed below. Beverage Amount Calories Carbo- Equal to: hydrate (gms) ------------------------------------------------------------- Beer Regular beer 12 ounces 150 14 1 starch & 1-1/2 fats Light beer 12 ounces 100 6 2 fats Nonalcoholic beer 11 ounces 50 10 1 starch Distilled spirits 1.5 ounces 105 trace 2 fats 86 proof (gin, rum vodka, whiskey, scotch, bourbon) Wine red table or rose 4 ounces 85 1.0 2 fats dry white 4 ounces 80 .4 2 fats sweet wine 2 ounces 90 6.5 1/2 starch & 1-1/2 fats light wine 4 ounces 55 1.3 1 fat wine coolers 12 ounces 190 22.0 1-1/2 fruit & 3 fat champagne 4 ounces 100 3.6 2 fats sherry 2 ounces 75 1.5 1-1/2 fats sweet sherry/port 2 ounces 95 7.0 1/2 starch & 1-1/2 fats Vermouths dry 3 ounces 105 4.2 2 fats sweet 3 ounces 140 13.9 1 starch & 2 fats General Guidelines for the Use of Alcohol Alcoholic beverages are a common part of our social lives. Each adult must decide whether or not to use alcohol. When making this decision, you should understand what the potential effects of alcohol are on your health. Although alcohol has little effect on blood glucose control, it Continue reading >>

Wine Protects Against Diabetes?

Wine Protects Against Diabetes?

Study suggests wine consumption offers greater protection against type 2 risk, compared with beer or other alcoholic beverages. In a study published in Journal of Diabetes Investigation, researchers concluded that any amount of wine — with certain precautions — can have a positive effect for type 2 diabetes. The pooled RRs for different alcoholic beverages indicated that all wine, beer or spirits consumption was associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes, according to the researchers. “In spite of the similarity, there were still diversities among different types of alcoholic beverages.” Wine consumption yielded a 15% reduced risk for type 2 diabetes, beer consumption yielded a slight decrease in the risk and spirit consumption yielded a slight reduction, although not significant. In an additional analysis for amount of consumption (low, 0-10 g/day; moderate, 10-20 g/day; high, > 20 g/day), any amount of wine was linked to a significant decreased risk for type 2 diabetes. Moderate beer consumption had a greater effect for reducing the risk for type 2 diabetes compared with the low consumption, but there was no decreased risk with beer consumption in the high category. There was a mild decreased risk for type 2 diabetes with low and moderate spirits consumption, whereas high consumption was linked to an increased risk. “The present meta-analysis demonstrates strong evidence that specific alcoholic beverages had different effects on reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes,” the researchers wrote. “Wine consumption was associated with a significant reduction [in] risk of type 2 diabetes, while beer or spirits consumption showed a slight decrease in the risk of type 2 diabetes. The study provides a new perspective to explore the association between alcohol Continue reading >>

Can A Glass Of Wine Help Control Blood Sugar?

Can A Glass Of Wine Help Control Blood Sugar?

Do you feel like you're cheating when you pair a glass of Merlot with your healthy, low-carb dinner? Well, research published in the Annals of Internal Medicine will help you sip guilt free, because that glass of wine might actually be helping you control your blood sugar. The study Researcher Iris Shai of Ben Gurion University led a study following 225 people with type 2 diabetes for two years to examine the effects of wine on people with already elevated blood sugars. All of the participants in the study ate a Mediterranean-style diet. The participants were divided into three groups, drinking either one glass of red wine, one glass of white wine, or mineral water each day. At the conclusion of the study, those in the group drinking red wine had improved cardiovascular health. But surprisingly, those who drank either red or white wine had better blood sugar control than those who drank mineral water. The improvements in diabetes management were not significant enough to consider a glass of wine a treatment for diabetes, but this is still positive news if you enjoy a glass once in a while. Be warned that the benefits of alcohol can quickly be outweighed by the possible health risks if you consume more than one or two small servings a day. But if you want to pour yourself one glass of vino to wind down your day, this study suggests you can do so with peace of mind that you aren’t hurting your health. For more on diabetes and alcohol: It's 5 O'Clock Somewhere Diabetes & Beer: Can They Coexist? Alcohol and Diabetes: Know the Facts Tags: type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Glass Of Red Wine A Day Can Keep Diabetes Under Control

Glass Of Red Wine A Day Can Keep Diabetes Under Control

A glass of red wine a day can keep diabetes under control, say scientists. A study of patients who did not normally drink found those having the regular tipple with their evening meal had healthier hearts and cholesterol levels than those who drank mineral water or white wine instead. And they slept better than those drinking water. Researchers followed 224 participants with type 2 diabetes - the form linked to obesity - for two years and put their findings down to the healthy antioxidants in dark grapes called phenols - the most well-known of which is resveratrol. "Red wine was found to be superior in improving overall metabolic profiles." Prof Iris Shai, Ben-Gurion University Prof Iris Shai, of the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel, said: "The differences found between red and white wine were opposed to our original hypothesis that the beneficial effects of wine are mediated predominantly by the alcohol." However both red and white wine improve sugar control among those carrying genes that helped them to metabolise alcohol slowly. It is though that diabetes affects nearly four million people in Britain although around 850,000 are currently undiagnosed. Diabetics could help keep their condition under control with a glass of wine Photo: Alamy The first long-term alcohol study of its kind - published in Annals of Internal Medicine - aimed to assess the effects and safety of initiating moderate alcohol consumption in diabetics and sought to determine whether the type of wine matters. People with diabetes are more susceptible to developing cardiovascular diseases than the general population and have lower levels of "good" cholesterol. Despite the enormous contribution of observational studies, clinical recommendations for moderate alcohol consumption remain cont Continue reading >>

A Glass Of Wine A Day May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

A Glass Of Wine A Day May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

If you're in the habit of drinking wine with dinner, there may be a bonus beyond the enjoyment of sipping a glass at night. A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine adds to the evidence that drinking a moderate amount of wine can be good for your health. The evidence comes from a new two-year-long study on people with diabetes. Researcher Iris Shai of Ben Gurion University says in Israel and elsewhere, lots of people with diabetes get the message that alcohol — even in moderation — can be harmful. "There is a myth that alcohol is not so safe for them," Shai says. In order to test the influence of wine on people with diabetes, Shai recruited about 225 people who already had elevated blood sugar, and they agreed to follow a Mediterranean style diet for two years. Everyone in the study was eating the same mix of foods but when it came to what to drink, some began drinking one glass of red wine per day, some began drinking one glass of white wine per day and others drank mineral water. And at the end of the study? "We found that a glass of red wine with dinner can improve the cardiovascular health of people with Type 2 diabetes," Shai says. In particular, Shai found that compared to people who drank mineral water with dinner, the wine drinkers — both those who drank white and red — benefited from improvements in blood sugar control. And the red wine drinkers got an additional benefit: They saw improvements in their levels of good cholesterol. The effects are not huge, but physician Christopher Wilcox of Georgetown University Medical Center says they could be significant. "One glass of alcohol per day had these admittedly modest but worthwhile benefits," he says. There's been a lot of interest in the idea that specific compounds in red wine may help p Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Your Diabetes At Christmas

Alcohol And Your Diabetes At Christmas

Easter time is a time for meeting with friends and family and inevitably involves food and drinks. It has been a good 15 weeks since the Christmas break with a little celebration at Patrick’s weekend in between. For many, Easter is the end of lent and a return to more fun and less rules / “sacrifices”. Enjoy the Easter. Here is a quick refresher on healthy guidelines around alcohol What is a standard Drink? Alcohol should only be taken in moderation World Health Organisation define a binge as six or more standard drinks in one short session. Low-risk guidelines are- 11 standard drinks per week for women (1.5 bottles of wine approx) 17 standard drinks per week for men (8.5 pints of beer or 17 shots) binge drinking is warned against – a binge is three or more pints of beer or six or more pub measures of spirits in one sitting Aim to have 3-4 alcohol free days per week Visit www.drinkaware.ie to calculate your intake. Images courtesy of DrinkAware. Alcohol Guidelines for people with Diabetes The general advice on alcohol consumption for a person with diabetes is the same as that for everyone. However, there are some precautions a person with diabetes should take, if your diabetes is diet controlled: Choose ordinary varieties of beer or lager as opposed to the low sugar ones e.g. Satenbrau, Holsten Pils Avoid sweet drinks or liqueurs and use sugar free, diet or low calorie mixers Alternate an alcoholic drink with a low calorie mixer or sparkling water Remember that alcohol contains calories and these must be taken into account for overall food intake for the day If you have been recommended to reduce your weight, consider limiting your alcohol intake to special occasions Diabetes managed with medication or insulin For the person whose diabetes is treated with insuli Continue reading >>

Red Wine And Type 2 Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Red Wine And Type 2 Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Adults with diabetes are up to two to four times as likely to have heart disease than people who don’t have diabetes, says the American Heart Association. Some evidence suggests that drinking moderate amounts of red wine could lessen the risk of heart disease, but other sources caution people with diabetes against drinking, period. So what’s the deal? A few words on diabetes More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes. That’s nearly 1 in 10 people, according to figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Most cases of the disease are type 2 diabetes — a condition in which the body doesn’t make enough insulin, uses insulin incorrectly, or both. This can cause high levels of sugar in the blood. People with type 2 diabetes must control this sugar, or blood glucose, with a combination of medications, like insulin, and lifestyle changes, such as diet and exercise. Diet is key to diabetes management. Found in many foods such as breads, starches, fruits, and sweets, carbohydrate is the macronutrient that causes blood sugar levels to go up. Managing carbohydrate intake helps people manage their blood sugar. But contrary to popular belief, alcohol may actually cause blood sugar levels to go down instead of up. How red wine affects blood sugar According to the American Diabetes Association, drinking red wine — or any alcoholic beverage — can lower blood sugar for up to 24 hours. Because of this, they recommend checking your blood sugar before you drink, while you drink, and monitoring it for up to 24 hours after drinking. Intoxication and low blood sugar can share many of the same symptoms, so failing to check your blood glucose could cause others to assume you’re feeling the effects of an alcoholic beverage when in realit Continue reading >>

How To Drink Alcohol And Avoid Sugar

How To Drink Alcohol And Avoid Sugar

If you want to drink alcohol and avoid gaining weight it’s a good idea to avoid beer (malt sugar) and sweet drinks (sugar). Wine and pure liquor, such as whisky or brandy, are better choices. All wines are not equally good: red wines and dry white wines (as well as dry champagne) usually contain the least amount of sugar. What is your favorite drink? Continue reading >>

Slow Cooker Mulled Wine With Sweet’n Low

Slow Cooker Mulled Wine With Sweet’n Low

Are you ready for tomorrow? Are you sure you’re ready for the crowd that is about to enter your home? Do you have everything? Gifts, food, dress, food? Drinks? Yeah, drinks! Ain’t no party without some spirits and wine, now, is there? Allow me to help you out with that answer; No. Moreover, allow me to help you out with the drinks part. How about we create a delicious hot beverage in the slow cooker? Mulled Wine is a great option! All we have to do is turn the slow cooker dial on low and forget about it until it is time to serve. Best part – it’s low in sugar! You can thank me for that after the holidays when you realize that I saved you a few calories and carbs. As part of the DailyBuzz Food Tastemaker program I was selected to create a low-sugar beverage recipe with Sweet’N Low sweetener. No problemo! We love wine. Underline, Bold, Italicize, Caps – LOVE. Now you definitely know how much we love wine. But this time of year, we like our wine a bit spiced. And warm. Don’t you? That is why it was a no-brainer for me when I was given this assignment. Sweet’N Low has made life a bit easier for people like my dad that are either borderline diabetic or diabetic. Because of my dad, we usually go around about adding sugar to many of my recipes by using Sweet’N Low sweetener in place of sugar. My dad loves his sweets and these hot drinks, but without the help of Sweet’N Low sweetener, he wouldn’t be able to enjoy them. For more information about Sweet’N Low Sweetener, hop on over to their website where you will be able to find more great recipe ideas and special offers. Now you can go rest easy knowing that for tomorrow you have a low-sugar option on that menu, which in turn will allow you to double up on that pie. I would like to thank DailyBuzz Food an Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Wine When You Have Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Drink Wine When You Have Type 2 Diabetes?

When I work with clients on reducing their sugar intake, invariably the question of drinking wine comes up. While abstinence from alcohol is ideal for a short period of time to detox their system, it’s impractical in the long-run. I usually suggest they limit themselves to a glass of wine with meals once or twice a week to minimize the additional sugar and “empty calories.” A 5 ounce glass of red or white wine contains 127 calories. However, wines are not created equal when it comes to their sugar content. Wine is made from grapes, which have two common forms of sugar: glucose and fructose. The grape’s sugar content is converted into alcohol by the use of active yeast during wine’s fermentation. The higher the sugar content in the grape, the higher the alcohol content in the wine. The exception is when the vintner interrupts the fermentation process. To produce a sweeter wine, the vintner stops the conversion of sugar into alcohol, creating more residual sugar and the sweeter taste. The European Union classifies wines as sweet once their sugar content exceeds 12 grams of sugar per liter (a litter equals 33 ounces). Semi-sweet wines range between 12 and 50 grams of sugar per liter while sweet wines including dessert wines, late harvest wines, fortified wines, and many regional Rieslings have more than 50 grams of sugar. Fortified wines such as port, sherry, and Marsala and late harvest wines, which are often served as dessert, have the highest residual sugar content. In contrast, wines that undergo the complete fermentation process contain less residual sugar. Dry wines have less than 4 grams of sugar per liter. Popular dry red wines include Zinfandel, Chianti, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Pinot Noir. Popular dry white wines include Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gr Continue reading >>

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Alcohol, which is made from fermented yeast, sugars, and starches is a very commonly used substance. In fact, 87.6% of adults aged 18 and over have consumed it at some point in their lifetime. It is also known as a depressant due to its capability to depress the central nervous system. About 71% have drank in the past year. When enjoyed in moderation, alcohol does not pose a risk, and actually has some health benefits to it. However, for those with diabetes, it can be a struggle to maintain a safe blood sugar while drinking. It is very easy to become hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemic (high blood sugar), depending on which type of diabetes you have and the medications that you take. Understanding the effects drinking has on diabetes is very important. This article discusses the risks and benefits of drinking. It also explains what drinks are best for individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Can I drink if I have diabetes? You can most certainly drink alcohol with diabetes. The key, just like many other things, is to do so in moderation. Also, if your blood sugar is not under good control, you should not drink because it can cause it to become too high or too low. Your doctor should be aware of your drinking habits so that they can make sure that you are not experiencing any complications related to it. I recommend reading the following articles: How does alcohol affect diabetes and my blood sugar levels? Normally, the liver is the organ that stores and secretes glucose to the cells in the body to fuel them when you are not eating. The liver is also responsible for cleansing the body of toxins. The liver does not recognize alcohol as food. Instead, it sees it as a drug and a toxin. When alcohol is in the system, the liver changes gears and begins to deto Continue reading >>

More in diabetes