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Sugar Free Jelly Gestational Diabetes

Nutrition Basics For Women With Gestational Diabetes

Nutrition Basics For Women With Gestational Diabetes

This guide provides basic information to help you start lowering your blood glucose until your appointment with a registered dietitian, the nutrition expert. These are general guidelines which may be tailored to meet your needs. Food is an important tool that you can use to control your blood sugar during pregnancy. Eating healthfully often means making changes in your current eating habits. A registered dietitian can provide in-depth personalized nutrition education to help you develop a personal action plan. Diabetes and the foods you eat When you eat or drink, much of your food is broken down into a simple sugar called glucose. Glucose (sugar) provides the energy your body needs for daily activities. Insulin is a hormone that helps your body use glucose for energy. Without enough insulin, sugar cannot get into the body's cells for use as energy. This causes blood glucose to rise. Too much sugar in the blood is called "high blood glucose" or diabetes. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a condition characterized by high blood glucose levels discovered during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is the result of hormonal changes that occur in all women during pregnancy. Increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta (the organ that connects the baby by the umbilical cord to the uterus and transfers nutrients from the mother to the baby) interfere with the ability of insulin to manage glucose. This condition is called "insulin resistance." As the placenta grows larger during pregnancy, it produces more hormones and increases this insulin resistance. Usually the mother's pancreas is able to produce more insulin (about three times the normal amount) to overcome the insulin resistance. If the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to overcome the effect of t Continue reading >>

Oh Joy! : Archives

Oh Joy! : Archives

I'm not gonna lie guys, being pregnant can be really unfun. I do like being pregnant most of the time...I love the feeling of a growing baby inside your belly, people are really extra nice to you, Bob will never say no to my request for a back massage, and of course, the prize you get at the end is awesome. I like being pregnant maybe 75% of the time, but the other 25% of the time, it just kind of sucks. I run out of breath really quickly, I have trouble sleeping, I've peed in my pants more times than I'd like to admit, and my body eventually just can't keep up. When I was pregnant with Ruby, I developed gallstones and had to have my gallbladder removed soon after she was born. And yesterday, I found out that I have gestational diabetes. Which means little to no carbs and no sugar until this baby comes out. To a person whose day is based around what I'll have for dessert, it was a pretty sad thing to hear. So, here I am all-of-a-sudden having to go on a diet, while pregnantthe one time your body wants just a little bit more to eat and needs a little bit more energy to get you through the day. Yes, I am super bummed. But I know it's for my own health and the health of our baby and that I have to get on track with this new plan even if it wasn't part of the old plan. So, friends, if you have any amazing protein-based, veggie-based food or recipe suggestions for me, I am all ears. Or if you've had gestational diabetes before and have any tips for me, I need all the help I can get! {Photo by Bob Cho. I tried to find a photo of me with a "thumbs down" but had no luck.} Continue reading >>

Sugar Free Jelly Crystals Archives Gestational Diabetes Uk

Sugar Free Jelly Crystals Archives Gestational Diabetes Uk

Staying safe in hot weather - Gestational diabetes and heat Summer has arrived and so what does that Read More Can gestational diabetes cause stillbirth? Can Gestational Diabetes Cause Stillbirth?#TalkAboutDiabetes This week is Diabetes Week (11th - 17th June 2018) and the focus Read More We're nuts about nuts, seeds, peanut butter & nut butters! Nuts, seeds, peanut butter and nut butters are Read More Summer is here... Time for a BBQ! A BBQ (barbecue) can a be a great choice for safe Read More Gestational Diabetes Easter Happy Easter ladies, time to start planning your Gestational Diabetes Easter! To help you with Read More Gestational diabetes risk factors and future diagnosis of diabetes Gestational diabetes risk factors and future diagnosis of diabetes in both the mother and child We felt it Read More Happy Chinese New Year! Kung Hei Fat Choi! For 2018 Chinese New Year we are celebrating the year Read More Pancake Day or Shrove Tuesday Pancake Day is almost upon us (Tuesday 13th February 2018) and many ladies Read More Gestational diabetes Party food Gestational diabetes party food can be hard to try to figure out and Read More Continue reading >>

Foods You Can Eat With Gestational Diabetes

Foods You Can Eat With Gestational Diabetes

Foods You Can Eat With Gestational Diabetes A health-care professional for more than 10 years, Rica Lewis has obtained numerous certifications in the industry. In 2006 she began channeling her knowledge into health-related articles for print and online publications. Her work has appeared in "Metroparent Magazine," "Anew Heart Healthcare Magazine" and community newspapers. Lewis earned a diploma from LongRidge Writers Institute. Special meal planning for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes affects pregnant women whose blood sugar levels are elevated during pregnancy. Women who do not have diabetes outside of pregnancy can get gestational diabetes. Expecting mothers are typically tested as a routine part of medical care. The disease is thought to be caused by the placentas hormones blocking the action of the mothers insulin, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The goal of treatment is to keep blood glucose levels normal. Special meal planning in addition to blood glucose monitoring and insulin injections are all aspects of treatment. When planning meals, the ADA recommends women with gestational diabetes limit fat intake to 30 percent or less of daily calories. A healthy breakfast for women with gestational diabetes might begin with whole grain toast with sugar-free jelly, a teaspoon of butter or margarine, one egg and a side of fresh fruit. Lunch could include a leafy green salad with a variety of vegetables, topped with a vinegar and oil dressing or a light variety with low sugar. Lean meats like turkey or chicken are also great salad toppers and can provide a substantial source of protein. Soups can also be great lunch meals and can incorporate a host of vegetables. Packaged foods should be limited, as they are often higher in calories, carboh Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

See active discussions on July 2011 Babies Okay so I am borderline with gestational diabetes and have to *** my finger 2 times a day. Thank you OB for changing it from 6 to 2! Anyways, has anyone else been diagnosed with it? If so, where are good preggo gestational diabetes meal plans? I've been good monitoring it but I'm still always hungry. I was supposed to go see a dietician but decided not to when she got real ignorant with me on the phone. I have it too- but have to test 4x a day. My doc had me go to a nutrition class for women with GD. I didn't feel like I learned a lot, but after a few days, I think I'm getting the hang of it. Here's what I have learned: 1. Must eat breakfast! Absolutely no cereal unless it's old fashioned, cook from scratch oatmeal. Breakfast should have protein and starch. No fruit or milk. A little fat is ok (bacon, eggs and a slice of whole wheat toast is great, can mix begins into you eggs if you want) 2. Must have 3 snacks a day- each with 15g carb and 7g protein. Some ideas are a slice of toast with peanut butter, or some crackers with cheese. Snacks are between breakfast and lunch, between lunch and dinner, and right before bed (this snack needs a little dairy too- 8oz glass of milk). 3. Lunch and dinner are similar- 1 fruit, 1 milk, 2-3 ounces of protein (a serving is 7g) and 1-2 serving carb (a serving is 16 ounces). Both meals can include any veggies you like (FYI- corn and potatoes are carbs, not veggies) 4. The number one rule I was told is that if sugar (of any kind, corn syrup, honey, molasses, etc) is in the first 4 ingredients, you cannot eat it, no matter what. This is tricky because a lot of whole wheat bread contains honey. 5. You can eat lean cuisine and frozen type dishes if you ready the back- just don't go over the carb Continue reading >>

Glucola Pregnancy Glucose Test: What I Do

Glucola Pregnancy Glucose Test: What I Do

In my post about the pregnancy and prenatal care options I chose, I mention that I don’t take the pregnancy glucose test that requires drinking glucola (that syrupy orange or grape drink) and that I use an alternate method of testing. I’ve gotten so many questions about this that I decided it deserved its own post, especially while I am still pregnant and the topic is fresh on my mind. IMPORTANT: Please note that I am only writing about my own personal experience with this and the decisions I made after consulting with my OB or midwife (depending on which pregnancy it was). The information in this post (or any post I write) is not medical advice in any way… I’m just sharing my experience. Always consult with your own medical providers before making health decisions, especially during pregnancy, and make sure that you find providers who are willing to work with you to make the best decision for your pregnancy. All that being said, here’s what I do when it comes to the pregnancy glucose test. What is the Pregnancy Glucose Test? This was one of the sections I found in all of the many pregnancy books I read when pregnant with my first child. Current guidelines call for a glucose challenge test somewhere between 24-28 weeks of pregnancy to test for gestational diabetes. This test typically involves drinking a sweetened drink called Glucola that contains 50, 75, or 100 grams of sugar in different forms. In most cases, the first part of this test is an Oral Glucose Challenge Test (OGCT) that involves drinking the 50 gram solution and having a blood test exactly one hour later to measure blood sugar. If a woman passes this test, she typically won’t be given further testing for gestational diabetes. If a woman does not pass the test, a longer test involving a higher Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And A Horrible Sweet Tooth!

Gestational Diabetes And A Horrible Sweet Tooth!

I don't have GD but I'm trying to eat by the rules of 100 Days of Real Food as much as possible and one of the core concepts is eliminating refined sugars and artificial sweeteners (which are NOT good for you) from the diet. It takes a bit of changing the way you view food, but I realized that buying whole foods (as in, foods that exist naturally) and shopping at places like Trader Joe's makes it a lot easier. You just start by stocking up on whole foods, and/or foods for which the ingredients list does not include sugar, and then augment with different naturally-occurring sweeteners like honey and pure maple syrup. For instance, instead of buying Frosted Mini Wheats I bought a box of organic wheat squares (ingredients: 100% whole wheat) and started mixing pure honey into it. Pretty freaking tasty, actually. The recipe index for the site is here . It includes a lot of desserts and other snack-type noms. You should check it out, it could be a great source of alternative foods while you cope with GD. You "plan" them into your meals/snacks. A few nights ago, I had 1/2 serving of a chocolate candy bar broken into chunks and mixed with pb so I could have a carb and a protein together. Another thing I have done is cut back on potatoes so that I could have some apple with my supper. In the 2-2.5 weeks since I got the GD diagnosis, I have also noticed that cutting down on the candy/cooky type junk sweets is causing fruits and less sweeter items (i.e. plain greek yogurt with 1/2 sugar jelly) to be satisfying to my sweet tooth. I use sugar-free popsicles and jello for "free snacks". When I get a carb choice snack, I am allowed 15 carbs so 100 calorie packs are good choices or the 100 calorie Choboni Greek Yogurts have been pretty tasty. I was told no honey or pure maple sugar, o Continue reading >>

Can Low Carb Help With Gestational Diabetes In Pregnancy?

Can Low Carb Help With Gestational Diabetes In Pregnancy?

When Natalie Thompson Cooper was diagnosed with gestational diabetes in her first pregnancy, at age 28, she was very concerned. The condition, which affects at least one in seven pregnancies to as many as one in five, causes blood sugars to rise abnormally high, called hyperglycemia. 1 Natalie knew hyperglycemia bathed her unborn daughter in glucose, putting the fetus at risk for a wide range of potential complications, including miscarriage, birth defects, macrosomia (very large size), high blood pressure, birth trauma, and higher rates of C-section and even stillbirth. 2 Moreover, gestational diabetes (GD) — also called ‘carbohydrate intolerance of pregnancy’ — greatly increases the risk that the mother and her offspring will both face future health problems, such as much higher rates of eventual type 2 diabetes, metabolic conditions, and cardiovascular disease. 3 GD is one of the most common and significant complications of pregnancy. Prenatal guidelines the world over recommend the routine screening of all pregnant women and then, if positive, strict management, starting with dietary therapy, then if that does not work, insulin injections. 4 However, to this day, what constitutes the best “dietary therapy” is hotly debated, with some researchers proposing a diet high in complex carbohydrates (60% carbs) and others lower carbohydrates (40% carbs). 5 However, the recommended “lower carb” GD diet is still far higher than the under 20 g per day of the strict low-carb high-fat or ketogenic diet. In fact, many guidelines for GD recommend women, on an ostensibly “lower-carb” diet, eat a minimum 175 g of carbohydrate daily, a level at which many women see their blood sugar rise out of control. “Honestly, 175 g of carbohydrate is stupid! Women should be Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

34 weeks and have been coping with gestational diabetes since week 26 with very strict diet and insulin injections. I know I need to be careful about what I eat for the baby, but I am pregnant and would knock someone out for a brownie if I could. Anyone else find treats or sugar free items that fit into your diet plan and satisfy those junky food cravings? I don't have GD but am on a low sugar diet for hypoglycemia (body produced too much insulin in response to sugar -- so kind of the opposite of diabetes). I definitely would not recommend sugar-free treats. They have so many artificial ingredients, and my experience when I first tried them was to get awful gas followed by diarrhea. (Sorry if that's TMI.) When I'm really craving something, I have a square of good-quality extra dark chocolate (above 80% chocolate), which doesn't have that much added sugar but that is very satisfying. Edy's makes some fruit and cream Popsicles that only have 9g of carbs. I found they were a great little hit of something sweet when I needed it that weren't too many carbs or calories-and were wonderful when it was so hot. I'd have a small piece of chocolate. or a few squirts of whipped cream. or I learned to find those Chobani greek yogurt with the fruit on the side surprisingly satisfying. or even just a 1/4 cup of icecream. none of it is much, but the little amount didnt spike my sugar. just have protein with it. and I did have some lowcarb/sugar free things once in a while, but I tried not to make it a habit. and when things get really tough, just know how GOOD it will feel when you deliver and you look like a superstar because you ate so well during pregnancy. I'm 12 days pp and am back to my prepregnancy weight. I had GD with my last pregnancy, and I have a huge sweet tooth, so it was Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

I Am Sooooooooooo Frustrated W/ Gestational Diabetes

I Am Sooooooooooo Frustrated W/ Gestational Diabetes

My endo told me not to eat fruit until after lunch. Dont skip snacks because that can cause your blood sugar todip and then shoot up too high. Yogurt by itself is probably not a good idea. It has carbs, so always eat a protein with,or ideally before you eat a carb. Makesure you do this at every meal and snack.This could be why your fastings are high you leave out a protein froma lot of your bedtime snacks. Make sure you are sticking to your portion sizes. Make sure you are eating 100% whole grain no white flourin anything. I cant handle even sugarfree items if they have white flour. I also cant handle low carb items if they have sugar inthem. You might want to watch out forthis too. Just so you know, lactose-free milk is lower in carbs. Remember 1 banana is two servings of carbs. Even if your jelly is sugar free, it might still havenatural sugars from the fruit check on that. Watch out for sauces barbecue sauce usually has a lot ofcarbs, I dont know about teriyaki. The chocolate rice cakes and chocolate syrup might not be so good after all. You should probably try taking a reading 2 hours after those just to check. Sometimes a really low fasting reading means that your blood sugar got too high the night before and crashed by morning. So watch out for this, too. I did take a reading last night after the rice cakes and it was 110 then this am I had a fasting reading of 87. Much better than usual! I know what you're going through - I'm SO sick of protein, too. Here's what I eat for my proteins - sorry, chicken and eggs are in there! Why not hard-boil some eggs instead of scrambled? Those are a quick and easy snack at night. And I got a bunch of canned chicken and canned salmon just to snack on too. And sardines, which are not the tastiest thing in the world, but they are Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Menu!!

Gestational Diabetes Menu!!

I've only been dealing with this for about 2 weeks now, and already I am getting bored with what I'm eating. If you have GD, can you please write down what you eat on a typical day(or something you really like? I hope if we get enough replies, we'll have lots of new ideas to help us get through this! I figure we can just write down the foods and we will each need to adjust according to our own personal portions/goals etc. - 1/3 cup of oatmeal, mixed with 3 tbsp. of unsweetened apple sauce and some cinnamon. - Spinach salad with chopped tomatoes, green pepper, cucumber, carrots and topped with some shredded cheese. - 1 small whole wheat tortilla filled with some spinach, tomato, shredded cheese and grilled chicken pieces. - Some Activia yogourt. (can't remember the serving size) - Open-faced pulled pork sandwich (pulled pork was plain, I added some low cal/carb BBQ sauce and mixed it in. The bread was whole wheat, thinly sliced bread. - 2 pieces of the whole wheat, thinly sliced bread, toasted and topped with some peanut butter. I'm not going to go through my "typical day of eating" but I will share some of my favorite foods that make an appearance on my menu. Some go to foods that I really love are almond butter, cashew butter, almond milk, turkey bacon, eggs, grilled fish, and I love to make quesadillas at home! I use whole wheat tortillas and quesadilla cheese, cooked chicken or beef, add in some onion and veggies and pan fry with olive oil until cheese is melted. It is heaven. Also one thing I love to eat: Lean ground beef browned in the skillet. Mix in cheese, veggies of your choice. Wrap in lettuce leaves like a burrito and enjoy! Super good! Take advantage of your free foods too so you won't feel hungry all of the time. I love sugar free jello, and my dietician s Continue reading >>

Sugar-free Pudding? - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Sugar-free Pudding? - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

I'm new to this group after being diagnosed with GD a week ago, and am still trying to adjust to my diet change. So far, it's been pretty easy, but I do have my days where I want to eat a huge slice of pizza and a bowl of sugary cereal! I was grocery shopping today and bought some sugar-free pudding... I have read that you should limit your intake on sugar-free items because of the artificial sweeteners, but my Dietician never mentioned it. I have to admit that I had some tonight mixed with Cool Whip and it was DELICIOUS!!!! Totally satisfied my chocolate craving. So, I'm wondering if anyone has input on sugar-free foods and their safety in pregnancy? I would appreciate it so much! I'm still eating small amounts of sugar - not including natural sugars. I'm not being too strict on myself but I'm definitely eating what I should be with the odd treat here & there! I have a massive sweet tooth which has gotten worse since being pregnant so I'm managing to find chocolate that has minimal carbs & sugar and thats satisfying my cravings some what, not like a normal piece of chocolate or a bowl of ice cream would but hey beggars can't be choosers. If your numbers are doing well allow yourself some space to move about, although I have been doing this for four weeks now and have only become more relaxed in the last two weeks or so, but tbh it's whatever works for your body best. Some people digest sugar easier than carbs. I am eating things with stevia, since it's a natural sweetener and doesn't raise blood sugar. Also erithrytol, which is often considered the 'best' of the sugar alcohols, although I think it's more widely available in Japan than the US. I use erithrytol especially in cooking, like in pasta sauces and teriyaki sauce, etc. instead of regular sugar. Also sometimes Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational Diabetes?

Have you been diagnosed with gestational diabetes? If so, please join this thread to share experiences, diet, information on the type of antenatal care to expect, birthing plans etc! I was recently diagnosed at 18 weeks. Very early indeed! My mum has type 2 diabetes and I'm of Chinese ethnicity so higher risk. I'm currently jabbing myself 4 times a day to test blood glucose levels. Seeing the dietician next Tuesday and hopefully the diabetes obstetrician the following Tuesday. Was scared out of my mind when the midwife told me the complications. I really hope bubs grows to be strong and healthy! Anybody else been diagnosed early? If you have been diagnosed at all please feel free to join! I have a GTT next week (16 weeks) as I had GD in my first pregnancy. DD is now 20mo and is a very happy toddler - we only had some minor issues in the first days with her having low blood sugar. I expect I'll test positive this time, but even if not I plan to follow some of the diet advice from last time. I think the complications are rare if the diabetes is well controlled, so in that sense it's better to have been diagnosed early I'll join! Currently 32w with dc2 after having being tested for gd with my ds who is now 2.4yo. I have to admit despite this being my 2nd pg I have no clue what I'm doing with watching my diet (its diet controlled ATM) as I find my consultant and dietician utterly useless at advising me on anything! I haven't even done the gtt this pg as they are just assuming I have it as before. My readings are pretty average and touch wood have been successful in doing this diet controlled only Have an appt on Friday with the dietician and suspect they will tell me the same as previous pg ... I'm measuring big and will need a growth scan. I must mention that despite only Continue reading >>

Sample Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Sample Diet For Gestational Diabetes

This sample diet for gestational diabetes is only an example of what is practical. Talk to your health care team for more specific details about the correct diet for you. The goal is to provide enough nutrients to support your body and meet the needs of your growing baby. At the same time, the diet must maintain proper blood glucose levels. Your calorie requirements will change during your pregnancy. For example, you would need extra 300 calories per day during the second and third trimester. The following diet plan is an example only. The purpose is to show you some variations and ideas. Every woman is unique and so are her dietary requirements. Therefore, it is vital that you follow a diet plan designed for you personally. Speak to your health care team to model a diet plan that is appropriate for you. Meal planning should focus on eating several small meals throughout the day. Small, frequent meals support the stabilization of blood glucose levels better than larger, infrequent meals. The combinations of foods are also very important. The age-old saying is "An apple a day keeps the doctor away." Eating seven apples on Sunday is a bad thing, where one per day is good. Another non-negotiable rule is to drink at least eight glasses of water every day. Adding to the examples below, drink at least eight glasses of water per day. A glass of water with every meal and snack, and you have had six glasses already. Drinking plenty of water is important in building body fluids, digestion and blood circulation. Extra water also aids the kidneys in expelling the extra sugar from the blood. Find out more about portion sizes at: Gestational Diabetes Menu. Sample Diet for Gestational Diabetes for Monday Breakfast. 2 Scrambled eggs. 1 slice of whole wheat bread, plain or toast. 1 teas Continue reading >>

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