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Sudafed And Type 1 Diabetes

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

From cough syrup to decongestants, here are the over-the-counter drugs that may affect your blood glucose Continue reading >>

Do Allergy Medications And Diabetes Medications Interact?

Do Allergy Medications And Diabetes Medications Interact?

I heard people with diabetes need to be careful with allergy medications. Are there allergy medications I cannot take with my diabetes medication? Zyrtec® (cetirizine), Claritin® (loratadine), Allegra® (fexofenadine), and Benadryl® (diphenhydramine) are all allergy medications that should not affect your blood sugar when used by themselves. However, these antihistamines are often paired with pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine. Pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine are both decongestants. These two medications can cause an increase in blood sugar when taken with diabetes medication and should be avoided, if possible, in people with diabetes. Be sure to read labels on cold and allergy medications, and be careful when the letter D is added to a medication name, such as Zyrtec-D or Claritin-D. This means that it contains pseudoephedrine. Continue reading >>

What’s The Danger With Decongestants And Antihistamines?

What’s The Danger With Decongestants And Antihistamines?

Why do over-the-counter decongestants or antihistamines warn that they are not to be used by people with diabetes? Robert Williams Fort Worth, Texas They can be used by people with diabetes, but with caution. Decongestants Decongestants are similar to adrenaline, thus they can cause blood vessels to constrict and increase blood pressure. Also, as with adrenaline, decongestants can release sugar into the blood stream and raise blood sugars. For most people, it is not a big deal. To see if it is a big deal for you, test your blood sugar, take the decongestant, then keep testing to see what happens. The problem lies in the fact that if you require a decongestant, you are probably already sick, so your blood sugars are high anyway. Caution is advised. Antihistamines Antihistamines have a slight decongestive effect, but not enough to worry about. One danger is that antihistamines can make you drowsy, and you may forget to test your blood sugars. R. Keith Campbell, RPh, CDE Professor of Pharmacy Washington State University Pullman, Washington I think that it’s safe to say that none of us were happy when we first found out that we had diabetes. The words “you’re a diabetic” or “you have diabetes” can sound like a death sentence and while we … Dear Nadia, Is marijuana used to lower high blood sugar? if so, does this mean I have to refrain from the munchies to get the benefits? Leah Dear Leah: The new Marijuana industry is still at its infancy in terms … Continue reading >>

Can I Take Sudafed?

Can I Take Sudafed?

D.D. Family T2 since May 2007 - Metformin I've got a real stinker of a cold! big sighs. Up till now I've avoided taking anything but Parecetamol. Does anyone know if it's ok to take Sudafed? I'm on Metformin and the active ingredient in Sudafed is Pseudoephedrine hydrochloride. I can't find anything to say I can't nor anything to say it's ok. When I googled it so much info came up that it did my already muzzy head in. From what I can gather sudofed can increase BG and also decrease the effects of Metformin. (not an expert) D.D. Family T2 since May 2007 - Metformin That's much clearer than anything I found. I think I'll stick to Paracetamol it's not worth the risk even if my bg is suprisingly good considering I'm ill. My doctor tells me it is ok to take one occassionally. One pill does not increase my blood pressure that much and I haven't seen any difference in the metaformin. D.D. Family T2 dx Dec '06 Metformin SR 2000mg, Victoza 1.2mg I've used it several times without any ill-effects Claire. I know there are certain blood pressure tablets that you shouldn't take it with, I remember reading that, but thankfully they weren't the ones I take. A1c December 06 6.3 March 06 6.2 June 07 5.7 Dec 07 5.8 June 08 5.6 Nov. 08 5.7 Jan 09 5.8 May 09 5.6 Aug 09 5.4 Feb 10 6.0 Sept 10 6.5 Feb 11 7.1 June 11 5.7 Nov 11 5.9 (41) Feb 12 6.1 (43) Aug 12 6.4 (46) Dec 12 5.8 (40.4) June 13 5.9 (41) January 14 6.1 (43) July 14 6.4 (46) Feb. 15 5.8 (40) Sept 15 6.8 (52) January 16 7.6% (60) April 16 7.0% (53) July 16 5.9% (41) Oct. 16 5.4% (36) Clare - I live on sudafed during alergy season - but it is the ONLY thing that helps me - My BP is ok and I have not noticed any change with BG D.D. Family T2 since May 2007 - Metformin I don't have any problems with my bp so no tabs that could be a Continue reading >>

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Sympt Continue reading >>

Will Sudafed Do Anything To A Teen With Type #1 Diabetes?

Will Sudafed Do Anything To A Teen With Type #1 Diabetes?

Will sudafed do anything to a Teen with Type #1 diabetes? I have a cold and my nose is Congested. I have type one Diabetes and noticed that on the back of the box it says do not take if you have diabetes. I was curious so i searched the web. Can any Doctor or Diabetic help me? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Sudafed stimulates the Sympathetic System that will make your Body use more Glucose and thus, when using Insulin it will create a state of "Hypoglycemia" in your body. This can be dangerous as you may experience "Hypoglycemic Coma" since your blood Glucose drops too low due to Injected Insulin and body's use of glucose. Source(s): Destroy Diabetes Starting Today : Source(s): I Cured My Diabetes : I am writing to tell you what an incredible impact these methods had on my life! I have had type 2 diabetes for 27 years. For me, the worst part of this horrible disease is the severe pain I constantly get in my feet. The pain is so bad that I avoid standing and walking as much as possible. I've got to tell you that within the first month, my feet stopped hurting altogether and I can now walk totally pain free. Believe it or not, I even danced at my niece's wedding last month, something I have not done in a many years. I've been following the book for six months now and my blood sugar is well within normal range. I feel great! I recommend you use the Type 2 Diabetes Destroyer to naturally reverse your diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder and is hereditary. It's genetic so there is no "cause" besides bad genes. It cannot be prevented. In type 1 diabetics, the body's immune system attacks the insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas and kills them off, therefore, the pancreas no longer produces insulin. Insulin is the hormone that Continue reading >>

Voice Of The Diabetic

Voice Of The Diabetic

by Sarah Johnston Miller, Pharm.D., BCNSP (Note from Dr. Wes Wilson: Looking at this question, I felt it would be wise to refer it to a pharmacist who is actively involved in both patient care and in teaching students about such problems. Dr. Sarah Miller is Professor of Clinical Pharmacy at the University of Montana, and is also a consultant at St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula, Montana. Her answer should be helpful.) Q: Which nonprescription drug products for treatment of common cold symptoms should a person with diabetes avoid? A: There is some concern about the effect some nonprescription (over-the-counter) medications may have on blood sugar control. The diabetic patient should always remember that, in general, "sick days" may be associated with fluctuations in blood sugar. This may be related to the stress of being sick, or to changes in dietary intake during illness. Your nonprescription medications may not be at fault at all--but it pays to know. A severe bout of the common cold (a viral illness) could certainly produce "sick days," elevated blood sugars--without any effects from your nonprescription or other medications. When you're sick, test your blood more often. Textbooks may list quite a few classes of potentially-problematic medications, though many of these are in reality not very significant. Regardless, the diabetic patient should always contact their health care provider (physician, diabetes educator, or pharmacist) prior to taking any new nonprescription medication. This includes "lternative"remedies purchased at the health food store or elsewhere; "natural" does not mean "safe from interactions!" You should be cautious that many nonprescription medications, including those targeting symptoms of the common cold, contain multiple ingredients. Another Continue reading >>

Decongestants - Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Decongestants - Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I went into my pharmacy today because I've got some bug thats going around. I wanted some decongestant or something like lemsip just to relieve my symptoms for a bit, but I wasn't sure which ones had sugar and which didn't. So I asked the pharmasist and she said there was nothing I could have except paracetamol or any other pain killer, because diabetics shouldn't take decongestants She said the only thing I could have was olbas oil to sniff.... but that never helps me and usually just give me a head ache! Whenever I have come down with a bug or anything i do usually tend to stick to paracetamol, but if feeling really grotty and bunged up I will have a lemsip, or sudafed, which is a good decongestant, not sure about the sugar content in it and cant find a box to tell you but it may be worth a try. I take Airborne whenever I get sick. It helps out tremendously. It contains only 2 carbs i think. Everything is labeled not to be used by diabetics. Geesh I get yelled at even when taking medicine. I have my dad in the background asking "should you be taking that" Then again he was the one that said shouldn't you be taking insulin when my sugar was 28. I have had this for years now and he is still confused. At my pharmacy we used to have special decongestants for diabetics but.... Hmmm I didn't realize till now that they don't carry them anymore. Our pharmacy has diabetic tussin that I picked up for Thomas. I think it is sugar free cough/cold medicine. Our pharmacy has diabetic tussin that I picked up for Thomas. I think it is sugar free cough/cold medicine. I usually try not to take anything, but w Continue reading >>

Treating The Common Cold And Type 2 Diabetes

Treating The Common Cold And Type 2 Diabetes

It is that time of year again and as a Pharmacist/Certified Diabetes Educator one of the most common questions over the fall, the holiday’s and winter months is “What do you have to treat my cold?” or simply “Can you make me feel better?” Well there is no cure and we cannot wave our “therapeutic” wand and make symptoms disappear but there are a variety of products to help with the symptoms of cough and cold. If the patient is relatively healthy it may be a bit of a hit or miss scenario but usually the product will ease the symptoms until the cold runs its course over 7 to 10 days. The picture becomes less clear when the patient is taking other medications, has medical conditions such as kidney disease, blood pressure, or they have diabetes. Assisting our patient choose an appropriate product that will not worsen their existing medical conditions, and lessen the symptoms that make them feel miserable is key. Diabetes is a condition that requires some adjusting to choose the right product. It is not always a “Sugar free”, “Natural”, or alternative product that is best, as active ingredients may have issues. These include raising blood sugars, raising blood pressure or stressing the kidneys (common issues with diabetes). Usually after a brief discussion to educate the patient, a product can be chosen to help both their symptoms and minimally impact their diabetes and blood sugars. The discussion that follows is a practical approach on how to decide what a person with diabetes can use so that they understand why we avoid certain classes of products due to a their existing medical conditions. Blood Sugars Can Rise when Ill It is important to realize that when a person with diabetes is “fighting” a cold it produces stresses on the body as a whole and Continue reading >>

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

It's that time of year again. Stuffy noses, scratchy throats, upset tummies, and splitting headaches can send even the most stoic among us to the local drugstore for a magic pill to take away the pain. The fluorescent aisles of brightly colored bottles promising fast relief can seem daunting. Are all over-the-counter cold and flu meds safe for people with diabetes? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Most experts agree that most people with diabetes can feel free to select whatever over-the-counter (OTC) product works best for them, so long as the medication is taken as directed. At the same time, everyone is different so it's important to shop smartly to ensure a quick and safe recovery from this season's infections. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Ask the Pharmacist Don't just wander around the drugstore dazed and confused. "When making these choices, this is a time to utilize a pharmacist…This is what they are trained for…Tell the pharmacist all your symptoms, what other medicines you are taking,” says Jerry Meece, RPh, FACA, CDE, director of clinical services at the Plaza Pharmacy and Wellness Center in Gainesville, Texas." Meter/Monitor Accuracy There's been concern that certain OTC medications can cause false blood glucose readings. "Ten years ago, as companies were changing the process by which they mon Continue reading >>

Anyone Have Problems With Sudafed?

Anyone Have Problems With Sudafed?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I've got a cold, a heavy drippy one. I hope it's the one of the season. Because I was having trouble breathing through a stuffy nose, I looked at a pack of sudafed. It warns on the back that it might not be suitable for diabetics. I looked on the web and found that pseudoephidrine can raise blood sugar. since I run mine low enough to have "space" to spare, I took one anyway. I didn't waste a strip checking Bg, because I wouldn't know anyway if it were the Sudafed or the cold, if it were to be up a bit. Has anyone any knowledge or experience with this particular, over-the-counter medicine? The only thing I tend to buy is olbas oil. The old fashioned bowl, boiling water few drops of olbas oil and towel over head works for me. Also a tissue impregnated with olbas oil next to the bed at night and I can get a reasonable nights sleep. I don't feel ill, but I am stuffy and by dose is sore. To add insult to injury, i thought I'd veg by the TV with a hot drink. Hot drink is OK, but TV refuses to come on. NO sign of life. I have checked plug is in properly and power is on. that's all I know how to do My Doc told me not to take over the counter remedies, and if I had any probs I should ring the surgery. If I ring I can always get a call back from one of the Docs and if needed a prescription will be available the same day. I've done this twice now and got a prescription within an hour. If it is of any help, I am a type 2, diet controlled and also a scuba diver. As such, I have had a fair amount of experience taking sudafed and, despite the warning, I have never been able to find it having a measurable effect on my BG. Obviously it may have different effects on di Continue reading >>

Sudafed Pe

Sudafed Pe

Fall is here and so are my annual sinus troubles. I'm feeling pretty miserable today. I just ventured out to buy sone Sudafed PE and -- unfortunately, after I took it -- I noticed that the box says to check with your doctor before taking if you have diabetes. Anybody know what the concern is? I'm not on meds or insulin so I don't have to worry about medication interactions, but I do want to know if I should be concerned about BG levels or something else. T2 since 6/18/08. Byetta user since 7/18/11. Aunt since 1/19/06. Got fed up with diabetes and pretended I didn't have it for six months. Trying anew to regain control. Back on board since 4/22/12. Don't know now. Haven't gone in a while and I fear it will be bad, bad, bad. D.D. Family T1 since 1977 - using Novolog in an Animas pump. I used to use Sudafed at lot (the one with pseudoephedrine in it). There was never a problem with the diabetes, and the doctor didn't have any concerns about it. But I found it highly addictive. So I stopped using Sudafed some years ago and I have been using a good old fashioned saltwater rinse to clear my sinuses ever since. It works much better, there are no side effects, and it doesn't cost anything This time of year I use the real sudefed (the real stuff you need to sign for) DAILY - no effects on BG - does make me a little dry mouthed so I make sure I drink a lot! D.D. Family T1 on insulin pump since 1997 Pseudephidrine can cause serious dehydration in some cases. That is a concern if you are diabetic. The serious complication is called hyperosmolar coma. Probably if you drink plenty of fluids while taking it you would be fine. If you also have vomiting and diarrhea it would be unwise to take anything containing pseudephidrine It is always best to check with yur doctor or the pharmacis Continue reading >>

Is It Okay To Take Medicine With A Decongestant ... | Diabetic Connect

Is It Okay To Take Medicine With A Decongestant ... | Diabetic Connect

Generally speaking yes you can and all the OTC allergy meds should be fine. Always double check with your doctor but there should be no reason for you not to use them. I've used various forms of tylenol and sudafed cold and flu meds as well as zyrtec, claritin and benadryl, brand and generic versions of everything. still waiting on my doctor's nurse to call me back and tell me if there anything they reommended for congestion for a diabetic. I hope there is something out there that works well, and won't raise BS too much. A report on the neti pot: it works! It really does help with congestion immediately after you are finished. I still have it, however, but that may be due to my allergies, that I waited a long time, like two days, to do something about. My allergies can be chronic. But, you can use a neti pot everyday. It helps cleanse the sinuses and any time you are exposed to smoke or other irritants. I think I will use this as a preventive, along wtih what my ENT puts me on (besides Zyrtec I still take that) he had me on Singulair, worked great for a long time, but then I was suspecting it was causing me sleep problems, which can be a side effect. The Zyrtec and Singulair never raised my BS. I wonder if there are any allergy meds. OTC that are safe for diabetics, that won't raise blood sugar. I can ask all the pharmacists around here today, there are several drug stores. But first, I am going to try a neti pot for the first time. This has been recommended on Dr. Oz and The Doctors. I bought one a while back, just waiting on hubby to get home with some distilled water. It says to use that, and not tap water. It is supposed to help clear sinuses. I know my congested is due to allergy, spring and summer are the worst times for me and I have had chronic sinusitis in the Continue reading >>

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. Some medicines raise blood sugar in patients while others might lower their levels. However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. 390 Drugs that Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels is also available for purchase in ebook format. 390 Drugs that can affect blood glucose Level Table of Contents: Drugs that May Cause Hyper- or Hypoglycemia Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Abacavir | (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine,zidovudine | (Trizivir®) Abacavir + dolutegravir + lamivudine | (Triumeq®) Abiraterone | (Zytiga®) Acetazolamide | (Diamox®) Acitretin | (Soriatane®) Aletinib | (Alecensa®) Albuterol | (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium | (Combivent®) Aliskiren + amlodipine + hydrochlorothiazide | (Amturnide®) Aliskiren + amlodipine | (Tekamlo®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B | (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV | (Abelcet®) Amprenavir | (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin | (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole | (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide | (Trisenox®) Asparaginase | (Elspar®, Erwinaze®) Atazanavir | (Reyataz ®) Atazanavir + cobistat | (Evotaz®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone | (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin | (Lipitor®) Atovaquone | (Mepron®) Baclofen | (Lioresal®) Belatacept | (Nulojix®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide | (Lotension®) Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) – Continued (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Betamethasone topical | (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole | (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, | (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene | (Targ Continue reading >>

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

When taking medicine, you must always read labeling carefully and be aware of possible side effects. When you have Type 1, you have the added consideration of how it will affect your blood glucose levels as well as any devices that you depend on for your diabetes management. And as with anything you digest, you must know the carb count, administering insulin as needed. Apart from daily medication such as birth control, having a sick-day protocal is always smart for the unexpected bug. This way, you’ll be stocked ahead of time with essentials to ease your mind and decrease additional stress over your care. Here are some must-knows about over-the-counter medication and what it means for your Type 1. Cold Medicine Being sick stresses the body, and when your body’s stressed it releases blood-glucose raising hormones. These hormones can even prevent insulin from properly lowering your levels. Consider the following when taking cold medicine: Opt for pill forms – if possible, pills over syrups are better for their lack of carbohydrates. Check for added sugars – When taking syrups, double-check the labels of over-the-counter brands to make sure they don’t have added sugar. See if there’s a sugar-free option – Though small doses of sugar don’t pose a huge risk, your safest bet is to ask your pharmacist about sugar-free syrups. Check your BGLs frequently – This should be triple the time you typically check. Being sick makes you more susceptible to BGL extremes. Administer insulin accordingly – Medicine, just like food, must be dosed for. Blood Glucose Levels Even without sugar, short-term cold medicines can send your blood glucose levels spinning. Aspirin has been known to lower glucose levels Pseudoepinephrine, the decongestant found in most over-the-counter Continue reading >>

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