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Successful Diabetes Programs

Diabetes Prevention Programs Built Around Afrocentric Culture Successful In Changing Dietary Behavior Of African-american Women

Diabetes Prevention Programs Built Around Afrocentric Culture Successful In Changing Dietary Behavior Of African-american Women

Diabetes prevention programs built around Afrocentric culture successful in changing dietary behavior of African-American women Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) While culturally traditional foods are a big part of the African-American heritage, they also are a significant factor in the type 2 diabetes epidemic among African-American women. And while the prevalance of type 2 diabetes is associated with higher rates of obesity, diabetes nutrition education programs have been relatively unsuccessful in attracting and retaining African-American women. However a new study shows that there is a way to reach members of this population and make a positive impact on their dietary behavior. African-American women who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can sharply lower their chances of getting the disease with diet and exercise. A new study shows that to attract and retain African-American women in a diabetes prevention nutrition program, it should be culturally sensitive. Successful diabetes prevention nutrition programs need to be culturally sensitive at the very least, they need to consider the traditional foods and recipes of the participants, says James Herbert Williams, Ph.D., the E. Desmond Lee Professor of Racial and Ethnic Diversity at Washington University in St. Louis. Programs for African-American women that are developed with Afrocentric values and culture in mind lead to greater program satisfaction for the participants and significant changes in eating habits. Williams examines the Eat Well Live Well Nutrition Program (EWLW) in his study Cultural Relevancy of a Diabetes Prevention Program for African American Women, to be published in the upcoming issue of the journal Health Promotion Practice. EWLW is a community-based, culturally specific diab Continue reading >>

Guest Post: How One Successful Diabetes Prevention Program Keeps Patients On Track

Guest Post: How One Successful Diabetes Prevention Program Keeps Patients On Track

Guest post: How one successful Diabetes Prevention Program keeps patients on track [Ed. Note: Dan Sheeran is the CEO at HealthSlate, a US-based Diabetes Prevention Program. Dan's team uses Nokia scales to help their patients reach weight loss goals.] We at HealthSlate are finishing up the second full year of delivering a national diabetes prevention program (DPP), which has been shown to reduce diabetes risk by 58%. A DPP works principally by reducing weight and increasing physical activity . Many thousands of clients reduce their risk by using the HealthSlate app, connecting with a coach, and tracking their activity and weight through great consumer products. And while theres no silver bullet to weight loss, we and our scale partner, Nokia, have spent a lot of time studying this problem. Weve learned that a key predictor of success is weighing yourself every day. Weighing in every single day? For years the most common advice has been to weigh in only once a week. Even celebrity weight loss experts have preached this. They argue that random variations in weight can make it too easy to get discouraged by daily weigh-ins, so the best solution is to just weigh once a week. We believe this is bad advice. More and more published studies have confirmed that people who weigh in every day lose more weight than those who weigh themselves once, twice or even 5 days a week. We see at least two reasons why weighing in every day makes a difference. First, stepping on the scale every morning helps you remember that you are working on your weight and health, which can influence choices you make later that day. Second, the problem with the common advice is not that those experts are wrong about weight varying naturally, the problem is that they are more correct than they realize. Our Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Program Successful, But Enrollment And Retention Barriers Remain

Diabetes Prevention Program Successful, But Enrollment And Retention Barriers Remain

During Saturdays symposium Population Health, Affordable Care Act (ACA), and New Approaches for Dissemination/Implementation of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), four experts will share real-world lessons learned from DPP implementation across the nation. The two-hour session begins at 4:00 p.m. in room 6DE. The National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is now a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention- recognized lifestyle-change program. It was adapted from a National Institutes of Health (NIH) randomized clinical trial that showed lifestyle intervention reduces the incidence of type 2 diabetes by 58 percent. DPP participants meet with a trained lifestyle coach for a year to improve healthy habits, such as exercising more, eating healthier, and reducing stress. Nina C. Brown-Ashford, MPH, CHES, Deputy Director of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Prevention and Population Health Group, will open the symposium with lecture titled Policy UpdateImpact of ACA and Medicare on Dissemination and Implementation of the DPP, which will focus on preventative care policies. Medicare will start reimbursing providers to deliver the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program, or MDPP, to eligible beneficiaries starting on Jan. 1, 2018. This is the first time a prevention model from the CMS Innovation Center was adopted under the CMS authority to expand successful payment and service delivery models to reach all eligible beneficiaries, according to a CMS news release. In 2016, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced the expansion of the National Council of Young Mens Christian Associations of the United States of Americas Health Care Innovation Award for providing DPPs following the successful actuarial certification. CMS Innovations 1115A exp Continue reading >>

Weight Watchers Successful Part Of Diabetes Prevention Program In Uk

Weight Watchers Successful Part Of Diabetes Prevention Program In Uk

Weight Watchers Successful Part of Diabetes Prevention Program in UK Patients with prediabetes referred by their general practitioner (GP) to a diabetes prevention program (DPP) that used Weight Watchers, a weight-management program, for the most part avoided developing type 2 diabetes in a UK study. "National Health Service (NHS) GP referral pathway into a 1-year DPP delivered by [Weight Watchers] achieved statistically significant reductions in measures of type 2 diabetes risk," write Carolyn Piper, department of public health, London, United Kingdom, and colleagues in their paper published online in BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care. Of note, with important implications for implementation, they add that their work provides evidence of "how to roll out prevention programs in the real world utilizing existing referral pathways." Specifically, the program achieved a significant reduction in HbA1c of 2.84 mmol/mol at 12 months, from 43.4 to 40.6 mmol/mol (6.1% to 5.9%; P < .01), and blood glucose levels also returned to normaI in more than a third (38%) of patients, with only 3% developing type 2 diabetes after 12 months. This is the first study of a DPP in partnership with Weight Watchers in the UK. A similar US study found that Weight Watchers was effective for achieving lifestyle changes associated with diabetes prevention (Am J Public Health. 2016;106: 949-956 ). "The lifestyle changes and weight loss achieved in the intervention translated into considerable reductions in diabetes risk, with an immediate and significant public-health impact," write Ms Piper and coauthors. They point out that evidence indicates that weight-loss interventions provided by commercial weight-management programs are more effective and efficient at achieving weight loss than intervention Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Prevention Program

National Diabetes Prevention Program

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) is an evidence-based lifestyle change program for preventing type 2 diabetes. It can help people cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half. The Diabetes Prevention Program research study showed that making modest behavior changes helped participants lose 5% to 7% of their body weight—that is 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person. These lifestyle changes reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58% in people with prediabetes. Participants work with a lifestyle coach in a group setting to receive a 1-year lifestyle change program that includes 16 core sessions (usually 1 per week) and 6 post-core sessions (1 per month). For more information about the National Diabetes Prevention Program curriculum, go to www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention or watch the CDC's Diabetes Prevention Program video online, or download and print the National DPP Infographic (PDF). What Is the Benefit of Being Part of a National DPP? Various organizations throughout Utah will soon be part of the National DPP, led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It is proven to help people with prediabetes prevent or delay development of type 2 diabetes. Being part of a group provides support from other people who are facing similar challenges and trying to make the same changes you are. Together you can celebrate successes and find ways to overcome obstacles. Eligible Participants The target for this program are adults 18 and older who are at high risk for developing Type 2 diabetes based on fasting glucose or A1C or via a short risk survey. You can download and print the CDC Prediabetes Infographic (PDF) for more information. National DPP Features Trained lifestyle Continue reading >>

Success In Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

Success In Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

Success in YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Programis a one-year community based program designed to support adults at risk for type 2 diabetes to make healthy lifestyle changes, lose a modest amount of weight, and prevent or delay the onset of the disease. Making healthy lifestyle changes is tough, but research shows that programs like the YMCAs Diabetes Prevention Program can support adults to live healthier lives and reduce disease risk.Type 2 diabetes isNOTinevitable. Meet Lauren, one of our seasoned Lifestyle Coaches, and read her 5 tips for success in the Program: Connect with fellow participants as soon as possible. Your success lies withthe group. You are not doing this alone!Your Lifestyle Coach is intentionally creating a space that invites community and relationship building, so take advantage.Start a conversation about how you might all stay connected to the group even when not in session, and don't be afraid to share your challenges with the group. Being honest with the groupmight take some vulnerability at first, but you will see the pay-off quickly in new relationships and (perhaps) unexpected support. Our research shows that participants who attend classes regularly and keep track of their weight and physical activity are more successful at reaching program goals - and that means reducing risk for type 2 diabetes. You will get to determine what accountability looks like with your group in early sessions anddiscuss how you will support each other as a group. Whatever you decide -stick to it! My participants in the Program come with all different types of experience and history around physical activity. Youre not alone in feeling like being active on a regular basis is tough. Well discuss many different ways you can be active Continue reading >>

Services | Diabetes Wellness

Services | Diabetes Wellness

Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Memorial Center's Diabetes Self-Management Education Program is recognized by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for delivering high-quality, evidence-based diabetes self-management education (DSME) classes The Program provides knowledge, skills and tools for individuals living with diabetes to enable them to successfully manage their chronic condition and avoid the many associated complications. Diabetes is a complex and chronic condition. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes there are many health decisions that are to be made daily such as what to eat and what to do when your blood sugar is high. Our team of health care professionals will team up with you to help you develop the new skills that you will need to transition through what can be a period of uncertainty. Several of the skills that you will learn include: Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center is proud of its relationship with the Suffolk County Lions Diabetic Education Foundation since 2007. The Association of Lions Clubs, an international service organization, works to eradicate preventable blindness, which can occur from having diabetes. To that end, the 50 Lions Clubs of Suffolk County support the efforts of the Diabetes Self-Management Education Program at BMHMC. For more information about the Lions Clubs of Suffolk County, call 631-427-4448 or visit www.suffolkcountylions.org. Learn more about Lions Diabetes Education Foundation . We participate in most Medicare commercial insurances. Please call 631-687-4188 to find out more about insurance coverage. If you're interested in participating in any of these programs, a physician's referral is required. To expedite the registration process, please fill out this insurance form and diabetes self-assessment form be Continue reading >>

A Systematic Review Of Real-world Diabetes Prevention Programs: Learnings From The Last 15years

A Systematic Review Of Real-world Diabetes Prevention Programs: Learnings From The Last 15years

A systematic review of real-world diabetes prevention programs: learnings from the last 15years 2School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, FI-33014 Finland 3Collaborative Care Systems Finland, Helsinki, Finland 1Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010 Australia 2School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, FI-33014 Finland 3Collaborative Care Systems Finland, Helsinki, Finland 4Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, 3004 Australia 5HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research, 8170 33rd Ave. S, Minneapolis, MN 55425 USA Zahra Aziz, Email: [email protected] . Received 2015 Apr 29; Accepted 2015 Nov 20. Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( ) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The evidence base for the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has progressed rapidly from efficacy trials to real-world translational studies and practical implementation trials over the last 15years. However, evidence for the effective implementation and translation of diabetes programs and their population impact needs to be established in ways that are different from measuring program effectiveness. We report the findings of a systematic review that focuses on identifying the cri Continue reading >>

Learn More About Diabetes:

Learn More About Diabetes:

Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, is a chronic disease in which there are high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. It is caused by a problem in the way your body makes or uses the hormone insulin. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or can't use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes sugar to build up in your blood. If left undiagnosed or untreated, type 2 diabetes can lead to serious health problems, including heart attack and stroke. We have two programs that can help: If you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, or have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes, you may be eligible to take part in our free, highly successful National Diabetes Prevention Program, a proven way to prevent type 2 diabetes by making small lifestyle changes. Are you at risk for type 2 diabetes? Take the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test! The NDPP research study showed that making small behavior changes helped participants lose 5% to 7% of their body weight - that is 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person. These lifestyle changes reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58% in people with pre-diabetes. The program meets for an hour in a small group setting over a year. During the first 6 months of the program, you will meet about once a week; during the second 6 months, you'll meet once or twice a month. Trained lifestyle coaches lead the sessions and help you make small, but important, lifestyle changes that improve your health. Lifestyle coaches work with you to identify emotions and situations that can stop you from being successful, and Continue reading >>

Success Stories: American Diabetes Association

Success Stories: American Diabetes Association

Download a print-ready PDF of this story. Eleven-year-old Andrs Alba of Elburn, Illinois has a strong interest in math and science. The Illinois Mathematical and Science Academy (IMSA) offers an all-day summer camp that fits the wishes of students like Andrs who want to learn more about science, math and technology. Andrs wanted to attend a week-long IMSA camp this summer, but hit a stumbling block because he has type 1 diabetes. Andrs, who was diagnosed with diabetes in 2010, lives a happy, normal life. He also happens to wear an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). He is well-versed in his diabetes care, but due to his age, he needs assistance at times. When he experiences high or low blood glucose, his judgment can be affected. Andrs has attended other summer camps in the past. Support systems were put in place to help make sure that Andrs stayed medically safe at those camps. For example, someone would contact Andrs's mother, Adriana, during the day to update her about his blood glucose numbers and, together, they would decide if his insulin treatment needed to be adjusted. This system worked very well and the camp directors supported it. Based on his family's previous camp experience, Andrs expected to be able to attend the IMSA camp. This was particularly true since IMSA's regular camp program (run during the school year) fully accommodated students with diabetes. But after researching the summer camp, Adriana learned that a registered nurse would only be available until noon each day. When she asked about diabetes care in the afternoons, she was told by a few of the camp directors that they could not offer any options for afternoon care. They did not propose anything to ease Adriana's concerns. Adriana wondered who would be there for Andrs after Continue reading >>

Success Stories: American Diabetes Association

Success Stories: American Diabetes Association

Read the Full Story | Download Print-Ready PDF Kerry Harrison's 11-year-old daughter, Kiara, has type 1 diabetes. Kiara recently faced an episode of low blood glucose while riding the bus. Although she keeps glucose tabs in her backpack, on that particular day, Kiara didnt have enough available. The bus driver pulled over and a fellow student gave Kiara a juice box to help. Kerry took this as a warning signit might happen again, and she needed a plan to help her daughter in case it did. Kerry contacted the American Diabetes Association for help. Read the Full Story | Download Print-Ready PDF Nine-year-old Ashlynn had participated in Santa Monica's CREST program since she was five, including track and field and volleyball. But in April 2015, Ashlynn was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Due to fear of a lawsuit, the CREST program would not train its staff to administer glucagon. After that, to ensure her care if glucagon was needed, Ashlynn could only participate in the program when her mother could also be there. Audrey, a working mother, could not attend every CREST activity, but wanted her daughter to have full access. So she contacted the American Diabetes Association for help. Read the Full Story | Download Print-Ready PDF Kevin, a seventh grade student from Encinitas, California, has type 1 diabetes. Kevin needed a 504 Plan established to ensure that he received the accommodations he needed at school and equal access to school-related activities. The school administration denied the 504 Plan because they said Kevin's grades were "too good." His mother, Sandy, contacted the American Diabetes Association for help. After confirming that Kevin had a legal right to a 504 Plan, and collaborating with others, Sandy was able to work with the school to have a 504 Plan set up Continue reading >>

Dining With Diabetes Program Success Stories

Dining With Diabetes Program Success Stories

Dining with Diabetes program success stories Nutrition education programs can help you manage your diabetes. Posted on November 2, 2017 by Andrea Aguilar , Michigan State University Extension Dining with Diabetes is a Michigan State University Extension program consisting with a series of four lessons of two hours every other week or weekly. It may include a cooking demonstration with a chef as well as a section on tasting healthy foods. The program focus is to help individuals diagnosed with diabetes, at risk of diabetes or their caregivers, to learn strategies to decrease the health risks related to living with diabetes. In Lenawee County, MSU Extension and the Lenawee County Community Foundation have collaborated to offer this program free of charge to the Lenawee County residents. Educator Andrea Aguilar has been delivering a Dining with Diabetes program in Lenawee County with a community volunteer chef and a diabetes educator. The program has been very successful and the participants said they enjoyed every minute of it! Some of the feedback from the participants reads as follows: Good recipes, good instructor, gave me the motivation to get back on track to lose weight and exercise This class was full of beneficial information. I truly enjoyed the incorporation of recipes and meals into the program. Andrea does an excellent job explaining diabetes. She has great props that she uses which really drive home her point. Wendy does an excellent job entertaining and educating while cooking This has been a very fun class and learned a lot. I really enjoyed the class, the instructor and the cook. They made the class very enjoyable and learned a lot Research shows the effectiveness of nutrition education on disease prevention and management of chronic diseases. These nutri Continue reading >>

Local Examples: Innovations In Preventing Diabetes

Local Examples: Innovations In Preventing Diabetes

Local Examples: Innovations in Preventing Diabetes Local Examples: Innovations in Preventing Diabetes Since its launch in 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions (CDC) National Diabetes Prevention Program has certified over 500 community-based groups, health care providers, employers, and health plans that offer proven diabetes prevention programs covering every state in the country. They succeed one person at a time, as the story of a heart doctor from North Carolina below shows. To spread this success across the nation, the CDC awarded funding to six national organizations. Following the doctors story below are descriptions of the way each of those programs help people with prediabetes conquer their health challenges and prevent diabetes. Also listed are some new national programs that are seeking CDC approval and could dramatically expand access to prevention programs. The CDCs diabetes prevention program has programs in every state . North Carolina: A Doctor Prevents DiabetesFor Himself Its hard to believe that even a heart doctor in North Carolina would need help improving his health, let alone receive a diagnosis of prediabetes. But thats exactly what happened to Dr. Don Graham, a pulmonologist in North Carolina . He had long known about the physical consequences of diabetes, but a busy job and poor diet had led to him gaining weight to the point of receiving a prediabetes diagnosis from his doctor. Hearing that was a major trigger for him to implement a lifestyle change. Thats when he joined his local YMCA, which was running a Diabetes Prevention Program, where a trained lifestyle coach discussed with him and others in a small group behavior changes that could help with healthy eating, increasing physical activity, and reducing stress. The year-lon Continue reading >>

Diabetes Program | Children's National Health System | Children's National

Diabetes Program | Children's National Health System | Children's National

Donate to support Diabetes Program (Childhood and Adolescent) and other lifesaving efforts The number of children affected with diabetes in the US has grown significantly over the last decade, with risk of serious implications for their long term health. At Childrens National, we have created one of the nations leading programs to treat and support kids with diabetes. We want our patients to live long and happy lives without complication, so we focus on helping them and their families learn how to successfully manage their condition. Diabetes Care at Childrens National: Why Choose Us? Childrens National is home to the largest pediatric diabetes program in the Mid-Atlantic region, providing care for children and young adults from Washington, D.C., Virginia, Maryland, and West Virginia. We treat children and adolescents (up to age 22) with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, with approximately 1,800 patient visits annually. TheChild and Adolescent Diabetes Program is directed by Fran Cogen, M.D. , a board certified pediatric diabetologist who is nationally recognized for her leadership in advocating for children and families living with diabetes. Dr. Cogen has been an innovator in the use of telemedicine to ensure that patients have regular appointments and education, eliminating travel time and making visits convenient for families no matter where they live. Learn more about Dr. Cogen and our Diabetes team Physical and Mental Health Awareness for Diabetes Patients At Childrens National Health System, our multidisciplinary care teams partner together to help children with chronic health conditions like diabetes. Children with diabetes are often at greater risk for anxiety and depression, so its important to provide the appropriate mental health support in addition to treati Continue reading >>

Level 2 - Setting Up A Successful Diabetes Program | Live Webinar - Diabetes Education Services

Level 2 - Setting Up A Successful Diabetes Program | Live Webinar - Diabetes Education Services

This course is included in: Level 2 Beyond Fundamentals .Purchase this course individually for $29 or the entirebundleand save 65%. With your purchase of our Level 2 online course, you have instant access to the On-Demand course via the Online University, PLUS we haveautomaticallyenrolled you in thelive webinar. Diabetes Education Services Online University Courses are an excellent way to study for your exam anytime and anywhere that is convenient for you. You will have immediate access to your courses for 1 year after your purchase date. Each individual online course includes a: 90 minute video presentation, podcast, practice test and additional resources. Intended Audience: If you are taking the CDE Exam or considering setting up a DSME program, this program is designed for you. Instructor: Beverly Thomassian RN, MPH, CDE, BC-ADM is a working educator and a nationally recognized diabetes expert. Course Level:2 (included in Level 2 Beyond Fundamentals ) All hours earned count toward your CDE Accreditation Information Video presentation and podcast available now On Demand. *Certified Diabetes Educatorand CDEare registered marks owned by NCBDE. The use of DES products do not guarantee successful passage of the CDEexam. NCBDE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDEexam, except for those published by NCBDE. Continue reading >>

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