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Substitute For Levemir

Levemir Approved For Diabetes During Pregnancy, Usa

Levemir Approved For Diabetes During Pregnancy, Usa

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just approved Levemir®, an insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection, as the first and only basal insulin analog for Pregnancy Category B classification, which indicates that Levemir® does not pose a higher risk of harm for the unborn when used in pregnant women with diabetes. The drug is manufactured by Novo Nordisk. Until now, the standard of care for diabetes in pregnancy has consisted of NPH, i.e. human insulin, however this has now changed, with Novo Nordisk being the only company that is able to provide a complete portfolio of insulin analogs with Pregnancy Category B classification. FDA approval was granted following a review of a large, randomized controlled trial that involved 310 pregnant women with type 1 diabetes, which assessed Levemir's® safety and efficacy compared with NPH insulin. The results demonstrated that women who were administered with Levemir® had a comparable reduction in A1C at gestational week 36 and lower fasting plasma glucose levels at gestational weeks 24 and 36 than women who received NPH. The researchers noted no difference in results regarding Levemir's® overall safety profile during pregnancy, its outcomes or the health of the fetus and newborn. Lois Jovanovič, MD, MACE, Chief Scientific Officer at Sansum Diabetes Research Institute in Santa Barbara, California remarked: "It is exciting that the FDA has granted approval for this new category rating for Levemir®. For women who are pregnant, diabetes can be extremely challenging; they must be even more diligent and careful when monitoring blood sugar levels than before they were pregnant. This approval provides patients with a long-acting insulin analog option that can help them manage their blood sugar." About 1.85 million women of c Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

Insulin can be expensive. If you’re one of the 6 million Americans with diabetes relying on this main-stay treatment, you could be paying out-of-pocket costs anywhere from $120 to $400 per month, according to a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine commentary. Drugs such as Lantus (insulin glargine) and Levemir (insulin detemir) have seen significant cost increases, according to a recent trend report by pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. One reason for the high prices is the lack of generic options for insulin. So for now, you’re stuck having to search around to find affordable options. Where do you shop for more affordable insulin? For some people though, high drug costs can mean making difficult financial choices. Our national polls show people might cut back on groceries and paying bills to pay for their medications. To minimize your costs, consider these options: Prescription Assistance Programs If you don’t have health insurance or are without drug coverage, look into applying for a patient assistance program (PAP). Through the nonprofit NeedyMeds, you can find some programs that offer free or low-cost insulin as long as you meet the eligibility requirements. Those are usually based on your insurance status, income, and diagnosis. You might also qualify for a diagnosis-specific program that can help you save on syringes, pumps, and other diabetes supplies. Pharmacists are also a great resource and can help you find a PAP that meets your financial needs. Switch Drugs Another way to save is by asking your doctor whether there’s a lower-priced insulin that’s right for you. While “long-acting” is a more popular type of insulin, it's also more expensive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it works better. “It’s mostly a marketing ploy,” says M Continue reading >>

Alternatives To Lantus Or Levemir?

Alternatives To Lantus Or Levemir?

Guest over a year ago Hello, I was on lantus for 1 year and had problems regulating my BG so my doctor switched me over to levemir. All of of a sudden I had problems with extremely low potassium levels. My doctors weren't sure what was going on. Come to find out low potassium is one possible side effect of levemir. Now, levemir works much better than Lantus so I'm wondering if there are any alternatives such that I won't have to go back to lantus? What other insulins should I (can I) use. Any info on the subject would be greatly appreciated. Anything at all. Thanks. An alternative to lantus would be humulin. Humulin is regular insulin that controls high blood sugar. It is a man-made insulin and is the same as human insulin and is a short-acting insulin. Often, humulin is used in combination with a medium or long-acting insulin. It can be used alone or with metformin. humulin vs lantus This man-made insulin product is the same as human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It is a short-acting insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. This medication is usually used in combination with a medium- or long-acting insulin product. This medication may also be used alone or with other oral diabetes drugs (such as metformin). Levemir (detemir) acts longer than regular (humulin) and delievers a low but steady level of insulin. It can be used with shorter-acting insulins. It can also be used alone or with metformin or exenatide. Lantus can be used as an alternative to levemir. Lantus (glargine) is a man-made long-acting insulin similar to human insulin. It starts working more slowly and last for a longer time than humulin (regular insulin). There are other insulins and non insulin meds that Continue reading >>

Product Important Safety Information

Product Important Safety Information

Selected Important Safety Information WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS Liraglutide causes dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in both genders of rats and mice. It is unknown whether Victoza® causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the human relevance of liraglutide-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined. Victoza® is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC and in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk for MTC with the use of Victoza® and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (eg, a mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for early detection of MTC in patients treated with Victoza®. Selected Important Safety Information Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients Levemir® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir® or any of its excipients NovoLog® and NovoLog® Mix 70/30 are contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin aspart or any of the excipients Warnings and Precautions Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch®; Levemir® FlexTouch®, NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog®FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device; or NovoLog®Mix 70/30 FlexPen® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens Hypoglyc Continue reading >>

Diabetes W/out Insurance

Diabetes W/out Insurance

Phoenix Diabetes and Endocrinology has compiled this information to help our patients manage their diabetes in the event they have lost their health insurance or have a very limited budget and cannot afford preferred therapies. Many type II diabetics can maintain good blood sugar control if they focus on diet, weight management and exercise as the primary therapy and use these cheaper medications discussed below when additional therapies are needed. Type I or insulin deficient diabetes patients will have a much harder time controlling their blood sugars with cheaper medications. Several insulin manufacturers have programs for diabetics without any health insurance to provide insulin at no charge. The forms for these programs are found at our needymeds link. For the type II diabetics: Some types of diabetes medications do not have generic alternatives. These include Byetta and Januvia as well as many of the modern insulin. These medications may need to be discontinued. Older insulins such as Novolin N and Regular human insulin work differently and will require more blood sugar monitoring to be used safely. Therefore, understand that these recommendations are based on cost considerations rather than obtaining optimal diabetes control while your financial resources are limited. Additionally, realize ignoring diabetes is not wise either. One ER visit for dehydration or infection due to poorly controlled blood sugars will be very expensive. Therefore, these recommendations are intended to help control costs, not replace needed medical care. Lab work There are many places where discounted lab work is available at less than half the cost of traditional labs. One such place is Lab Express 602-273-9000. A comprehensive metabolic panel cost $45 and hemoglobin A1c costs $65. I bel Continue reading >>

Levemir U-100 Insulin Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Levemir U-100 Insulin Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Insulin detemir is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes . Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke . Insulin detemir is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin . It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It acts longer than regular insulin, providing a low, steady level of insulin. It works by helping blood sugar ( glucose ) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. Insulin detemir may be used with a shorter-acting insulin product. It may also be used alone or with other diabetes drugs (such as metformin , exenatide ). Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin . Insulin detemir should be clear and colorless. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin ( lipodystrophy ). Insulin detemir may be injected in the stomach area, the thigh, or the back of the upper arm. Do not inject into a vein or muscle because very low blood sugar ( hypoglycemia ) may occur. Do not rub the area after the injection. Do not inject into skin that is red, swollen, or itchy. Do not inject cold insul Continue reading >>

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas. Both are insulin analogues, which means that their insulin molecules are analogous to human insulin, but engineered, or recombined, with slight differences that slow their absorption. Lantus is a clear formula made with glargine, a genetically modified form of human insulin, dissolved in a special solution. Levemir is also a clear formula, but it contains dissolved detemir, a different form of genetically modified insulin. Human insulin is made of two amino acid chains, called A and B, that have two disulfide bonds between them. In glargine, one amino acid has been switched out, and two extra amino acids have been added to one end of the B chain. The modifications make glargine soluble at an acidic pH, but much less soluble at the neutral pH that’s found in the body To make Lantus, first the glargine is produced by a vat of E. coli bacteria. Then it’s purified and added to a watery solution containing a little zinc and some glycerol; a dash of hydrochloric acid is also added to make it acidic, bringing its pH down to about 4. At that degree of acidity, glargine completely dissolves into the watery solution, which is why the vial is clear. After you inject it into your subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized by your body to a neutral pH. Because glargine is not soluble at a neutral pH, it precipitates out into a form that’s not soluble in subcutaneous fat, and there forms a relatively insoluble depot. From that pool, or depot, of precipitated glargine in the tissues, small amounts slowly move back Continue reading >>

Levemir 100iu/ml Solution For Injection

Levemir 100iu/ml Solution For Injection

Taking Insulin detemir with alcohol may affect blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes. Levemir 100IU/ml Solution for Injection is probably safe to use during pregnancy. Animal studies have shown low or no adverse effect on the foetus, however, there are limited human studies. Please consult your doctor. Levemir 100IU/ml Solution for Injection is safe to use during lactation. Human studies have shown that either the drug does not pass into the breastmilk in significant amount or is not expected to cause toxicity to the baby. Your ability to drive may be affected if your blood sugar is low or high. If this happens, do not drive. Levemir 100IU/ml Solution for Injection should be used with caution in patients with kidney disease. Dose adjustment of Levemir 100IU/ml Solution for Injection may be needed. Please consult your doctor. Regular monitoring of blood glucose levels is recommended for dose adjustment. Levemir 100IU/ml Solution for Injection should be used with caution in patients with liver disease. Dose adjustment of Levemir 100IU/ml Solution for Injection may be needed. Please consult your doctor. Regular monitoring of glucose levels is recommended for dose adjustment. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Rates | Levemir (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection)

Hypoglycemia Rates | Levemir (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection)

Levemir once dailya had low rates of hypoglycemia1 In TITRATE, a 20-week randomized clinical trial1: Low rates of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes being treated to reach A1C goal <7%1,b Results from a 20-week, randomized, controlled, multicenter, open-label, parallel-group, treat-to-target trial using a physician-directed self-titration algorithm in insulin-nave patients with type 2 diabetes, A1C 7% and 9% on oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) therapy, randomized to Levemir and OAD (1:1) to 2 different FPG titration targets (70-90 mg/dL [n=122] or 80-110 mg/dL [n=122]). At study end, in the 80-110 mg/dL group, 55% of patients achieved goal (A1C 7%) with a mean A1C decrease of 0.9%. The mean A1C was 7%. The mean FPG reduction was 50.4 mg/dL.1 bMinor=self measured plasma glucose <56 mg/dL and not requiring third-party assistance; major=requiring third-party assistance. aLevemir can be dosed once or twice daily.2 All patients received Levemirinjection once daily1,a In the same study, mean FPG values decreased in the first 8 weeks, then remained generally flat, with a total drop of 57.6 mg/dL in the 70-90 mg/dL group and 50.4 mg/dL drop in the 80-110 mg/dL group.1 In TRANSITION, a 26-week randomized clinical trial3: Low rates of minor hypoglycemia in patients being treated with metformin + sitagliptin + Levemir3,c Results from TRANSITION, a 26-week, open-label, randomized, parallel-group study in patients with type 2 diabetes. Insulin-nave patients concomitantly treated with metformin +/ a second OAD were randomized to receive either once-dailya Levemir + sitagliptin + metformin (n=111; metformin continued while all other OADs discontinued) or sitagliptin + metformin +/ sulfonylurea (SU) (n=111; metformin and SU continued while all other OADs discontinued. SU was al Continue reading >>

Generic Levemir Availability

Generic Levemir Availability

Levemir is a brand name of insulin detemir, approved by the FDA in the following formulation(s): LEVEMIR (insulin detemir recombinant - injectable;subcutaneous) Manufacturer: NOVO NORDISK INC Approval date: June 16, 2005 Strength(s): 300 UNITS/3ML (100 UNITS/ML) Manufacturer: NOVO NORDISK INC Approval date: June 16, 2005 Strength(s): 300 UNITS/3ML (100 UNITS/ML) Manufacturer: NOVO NORDISK INC Approval date: June 16, 2005 Strength(s): 300 UNITS/3ML (100 UNITS/ML) Has a generic version of Levemir been approved? No. There is currently no therapeutically equivalent version of Levemir available in the United States. Note: Fraudulent online pharmacies may attempt to sell an illegal generic version of Levemir. These medications may be counterfeit and potentially unsafe. If you purchase medications online, be sure you are buying from a reputable and valid online pharmacy. Ask your health care provider for advice if you are unsure about the online purchase of any medication. See also: Generic Drug FAQs. Patents are granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office at any time during a drug's development and may include a wide range of claims. Acylated insulin Patent 5,750,497 Issued: May 12, 1998 Inventor(s): Havelund; Svend & Halstr.o slashed.m; John & Jonassen; Ib & Andersen; Asser Sloth & Markussen; Jan Assignee(s): Novo Nordisk A/S The present invention relates to human insulin derivatives having a protracted profile of action in which the A21 and B3 amino acid residues are, independently, any amino acid residue which can be coded for by the genetic code except Lys, Arg and Cys; Phe.sup.B1 may be deleted; the B30 amino acid residue is (a) a non-codable, lipophilic amino acid having from 10 to 24 carbon atoms in which case an acyl group of a carboxylic acid with up to 5 carbon Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulins

Long-acting Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Drug UPDATES: TRESIBA ®- insulin degludec injection [Drug information / PDF] Click link for the latest monograph Dosing: Click (+) next to Dosage and Administration section (drug info link) Initial U.S. Approval: 2015 Mechanism of Action: The primary activity of insulin, including TRESIBA, is regulation of glucose metabolism. Insulin and its analogs lower blood glucose by stimulating peripheral glucose uptake, especially by skeletal muscle and fat, and by inhibiting hepatic glucose production. Insulin also inhibits lipolysis and proteolysis, and enhances protein synthesis. TRESIBA forms multi-hexamers when injected into the subcutaneous tissue resulting in a subcutaneous insulin degludec depot. The protracted time action profile of TRESIBA is predominantly due to delayed absorption of insulin degludec from the subcutaneous tissue to the systemic circulation and to a lesser extent due to binding of insulin-degludec to circulating albumin. INDICATIONS AND USAGE: TRESIBA is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use TRESIBA is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Dosing: Individualize dose based on type of diabetes, metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results and glycemic control goal. Rotate injection sites to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy. Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Administer subcutaneously once daily at any time of day. Do NOT perform dose conversion when using the TRESIBA U-100 or U-200 FlexTouch pens. The TRESIBA U-100 and U-200 FlexTouch pens dose window shows the number of insulin units to be delivered and NO conversion is needed. HOW SUPPLIE Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Detemir (levemir, Levemir Flexpen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Detemir (levemir, Levemir Flexpen)?

A A A Medications and Drugs Brand Names: Levemir, Levemir FlexPen Generic Name: insulin detemir (Pronunciation: IN su lin DE te mir) What is the most important information I should know about insulin detemir (Levemir, Levemir FlexPen)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using insulin detemir (Levemir, Levemir FlexPen)? What is insulin detemir (Levemir, Levemir FlexPen)? Insulin detemir is a man-made form of insulin, a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin detemir is a long-acting form of insulin that is slightly different from other forms of insulin that are not man-made. Insulin detemir is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. Insulin detemir is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Insulin detemir may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: itching, swelling, or redness where you inject insulin detemir; swelling in your hands or feet; or low potassium (confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle weakness or limp feeling). Less serious side effects may include: thickening of the skin where you inject insulin detemir; weight gain; stomach pain; or flu symptoms, or cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA- Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting injectable insulins that can be used for long-term management of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced in the body by the pancreas. It helps convert the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream into energy. This energy is then distributed to cells throughout your body. With diabetes, your pancreas produces little or no insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin correctly. Without insulin, your body can’t use the sugars in your blood and can become starved for energy. The excess sugar in your blood can also damage different parts of your body, including your blood vessels and kidneys. Everyone with type 1 diabetes and many people with type 2 diabetes must use insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Levemir is a solution of insulin detemir, and Lantus is a solution of insulin glargine. Both are basal insulin formulas. That means that they work slowly to lower your blood sugar levels. They’re both absorbed into your body over a 24-hour period. They keep blood sugar levels lowered for longer than short-acting insulins do. Although the formulations are slightly different, Levemir and Lantus are very similar drugs. There are only a few differences between them. Children and adults can use both Levemir and Lantus. Specifically, Levemir can be used by people who are 2 years or older. Lantus can be used by people who are 6 years or older. Levemir or Lantus can help with daily management of diabetes. However, you may still need to use short-acting insulin to treat spikes in your blood sugar levels and diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous buildup of acids in your blood). Learn more: All about diabetic ketoacidosis » Administration Both Levemir and Lantus are given through injection in the same way. You can gi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Discussion Boards - Joslin Diabetes Center

Diabetes Discussion Boards - Joslin Diabetes Center

Most people take levemir once a day like Lantus. There are some that find it beneficial to split the dose, but that does not mean it is the way for everyone. I think one needs to try it first and see how it works for them and then discuss splitting the dose with their doctor. We are not professionals and we are not here to give people medial advice. We are here to give opinions and provide support to each other. That said, I take Levemir once a day at bedtime and have absolutely no problem with it. As Ron said it is more predictable in activity and there are less lows. When I first started on it last January ('09) I was taking 68 units a day. However, since losing 72 pounds I am now down to 40 units and continuing to reduce the amount as I lose weight. Jen, I suspect you are a type 2? If so, type 2's tend to be more tolerant of variations in insulin activity, in that your pancreas can still control BG to some degree. However, type 1 diabetics are far less tolerant of an activity mismatch with carb digestion. I suspect not too many will get satisfactory control with 1 shot of Levemir per day for a basal. The other thing to remember is that Levemir is quite dose sensitive. The more you take, the longer it lasts. A small dose peaks early, while a large dose peaks later and is more sustained. Typically type 1's use far less insulin than a type 2, so the activity curve will be shorter and more peak like. In response to your post, I don't know what Type I am, I suspect II but I became diabetic following an acute attack of pancreatitis (which has since been diagnosed as chronic). Since pancreatitis causes damage to the pancreas It can kill the cells that secrete insulin. I'm finding however, that as I lose weight I am using the insulin I take more efficiently. Dave: Have you Continue reading >>

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