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Stuffing For Diabetics

Diabetes-friendly Holiday Dishes

Diabetes-friendly Holiday Dishes

Take Control of Thanksgiving Dinner The current approach to dietary management of diabetes is to tailor the meal plan for each individual. But in general, a healthy diabetic diet involves controlling total carbohydrates (particularly refined carbohydrates), reducing calories and sodium, increasing fiber, and replacing saturated fats and trans fats with more heart–healthy mono– and polyunsaturated fats. This approach, of course, is healthy for anyone who wants to eat better. Try these healthier recipes when you're in charge of Thanksgiving cooking. First up: Sunflower seeds and brown rice pack a double nutrition punch, enhancing our Multigrain Pilaf with Sunflower Seeds side dish with vitamin E and niacin. View Recipe: Multigrain Pilaf with Sunflower Seeds Tuscan Turkey Forget dry, tasteless turkey. A rub of roasted garlic and fresh sage permeates every ounce of the bird, while a Dijon and white wine baste locks in moisture for juicy, tender meat. Save the giblets for our Classic Turkey Gravy. If your turkey starts to overbrown after the first hour in the oven, cover loosely with foil, and continue roasting. Remember to let the turkey rest so juices can redistribute and the bird can cool enough to carve. View Recipe: Tuscan Turkey Chorizo and Roasted Poblano Wild Rice Stuffing Hot cooked wild rice is incredibly nutty and fragrant, a perfect counter to smoky paprika, quick roasted poblano peppers, and spicy fresh chorizo. Look for ground, raw Mexican chorizo rather than Spanish chorizo (cured, cased sausage). The rice will absorb the drippings from the sausage as the two bake together in the casserole dish. If you can’t find Mexican chorizo, try hot Italian pork or turkey sausage. We treat the rice the same as a bread stuffing—binding it with a mixture of stock, e Continue reading >>

What Can Diabetics Eat At Thanksgiving Dinner?

What Can Diabetics Eat At Thanksgiving Dinner?

With all forms of diabetes, the goal is consistent management of your blood sugar to prevent the long-term damage to nerves, blood vessels and organs that can result from uncontrolled diabetes. When you have Type 2 diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin or is unable to use it well. Overeating, particularly high carbohydrate foods like many of those served at Thanksgiving, will cause your blood sugar to rise. Even in the short-term, this can cause headaches, fatigue and leave you feeling generally lousy. Thanksgiving is just one day, but you will feel better and enjoy the holiday more if you pay attention to what and how much you eat. This doesn't mean you have to miss out on your favorite foods. Hopefully, you are working with your doctor or a dietitian and learning about monitoring your blood sugar, counting carbohydrates in foods and staying active. For Thanksgiving, feel free to taste everything, but pay attention to portion size and limit your intake of high-carbohydrate foods. Remember that drinks like alcoholic beverages and eggnog are loaded with sugars, so it's often a good idea to skip these and drink water since the table is likely to be filled with many of your favorite high-carb foods. Many diabetes educators advise patients to use a plate strategy during holiday time. Fill half of your 9-inch plate with nonstarchy vegetables -- this includes salad, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, turnips, carrots and others. (You can find list of nonstarchy vegetables here.) Reserve a quarter of your plate for the turkey, but leave off the skin. The remaining quarter of your plate can include dollops of your favorite starchy foods like sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes, stuffing, corn or butternut squash, but don't overdo it and skip the marshmallows. Remem Continue reading >>

Sage Stuffing - Recipes For Healthy Living By The American Diabetes Association

Sage Stuffing - Recipes For Healthy Living By The American Diabetes Association

Here's a stuffing recipe thats on the healthier side but will still thrill your guests. Our Sage Stuffing uses whole grain bread, omega-3 rich walnuts, and cranberries to give it a holiday twist. 30 slices (1-ounce each) day-old whole-grain bread, crusts removed, cut into small cubes 1/2 bunch fresh sage, stems removed, coarsely chopped 3 cups hot low-fat, reduced-sodium chicken broth 1/2 cup dried cranberries or dried cherries, coarsely chopped Kosher salt and fresh-ground black pepper to taste Preheat the oven to 375 F. Add the bread to a large bowl. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and celery, and saut for 3 minutes. Add the walnuts and saut for 2 minutes. Add in the sage and cook for 1 minute. Add the onion-sage mixture to the bread. Pour the hot chicken broth and egg over the onion-sage, and mix well (until moist). Add in the cranberries or cherries. Season well with salt and pepper. Add the mixture to a large casserole dish, and sprinkle with paprika. Bake for about 40-45 minutes, or until the top is browned and crusty. From The Family Classics Cookbook by American Diabetes Association Continue reading >>

Turkey Stuffing

Turkey Stuffing

D.D. Family preD 1971 - T2 2003 - insulin 2005 I am going to do a traditional turkey for Thanksgiving, I am right now contemplating a different stuffing to use instead of the cornbread or traditional wheat breads. I will be cutting down on the bread and be using a small amount of the sprouted grain flax bread with root veggies like parsnips, turnips, rutabegas, cabbage, apple, onion, walnuts, mushrooms. Anyone have any ideas on tweeking this or adding to it. The amounts of each item are small as they all add up. metformin-2000mg, lisinopril-20mg, thyronorm-137mcg For me the stuffing is the best part of Thanksgiving dinner. I have always made mine from scratch but now am wondering how to eliminate the bread. I think using sprouted grain bread is a great idea. I would spray it with Pam and sprinkle with poultry seasoning and toast it first and then break into cubes. I also use a lot of celery , chopped apples, onions and mushrooms in it. I use to add orange juice to lower the fat. I never used melted butter. Use chicken broth and maybe some orange extract. You can also add different kinds of nuts and extra flaxseed. I've seen some low carb stuffing posted on some recipe sites. I'll see if I can find them. Now you've got me hungry and craving turkey and stuffing. D.D. Family preD 1971 - T2 2003 - insulin 2005 good idea on the celery, forgot that one and I always toast the breads the day before and leave them in to oven to dry up further. I use butter but in reduced amount, and make a broth from the neck and giblets to use in the stuffing I am thinking of adding pine nuts and whole garlic cloves to the mix On Lindas Low Carb menus, I found 4 or 5 versions of low carb stuffing. Some have some unique ingredients like pork rinds or cauliflower. You might be able to combine se Continue reading >>

Healthy Baked Stuffing

Healthy Baked Stuffing

This Healthy Baked Stuffing recipe is going to make Thanksgiving so much more enjoyable for me. I know that my meal will be a slight cross over because that is okay and totally on plan as part of my Trim Healthy Mama Journey. When I started playing with this recipe I cut it way back because lets face it we are a family of 2 and that much Healthy Baked Stuffing is way too much even for us, but it froze beautifully. Thinking about all of the larger families that are following Trim Healthy Mama I wanted to make sure we had a family size recipe that Mamas could make. The Low Carb Style Breads I have used to make this Healthy Baked Stuffing As many of you are aware I bake a lot of bread, both S and E styles, for this healthy baked stuffing recipe I tried it with a bunch of different ones. Simple Soda Bread was my first choice. Why? because it really is a simple bread to bake and I had some on hand that needed to be used up. Basic Low Carb Yeast Bread was the second recipe that I tried. This is a simple and quick recipe that gives you a white bread style loaf. Nuke Queens Awesome Bread I dont normally make this unless I add spices to it and bake it in the oven. (personal preference) but it will work in this recipe. I rarely cook bread or anything else in the microwave (its a personal road block, I deal with). If you havent tried these recipes you may want to as they are game changing for S meals while following Trim Healthy Mama. The types of bread pans I use when baking these breads I prefer to use silicone pans when baking alternative breads because they are less likely to stick to the pan. When I first began my THM journey I purchased a set of these pans and they have been a blessing for so many recipes. Why I love using Fresh Herbs and Spices in Baked Stuffing recipes Fr Continue reading >>

Diabetic Friendly Thanksgiving Recipe: Buttermilk Cornbread Dressing

Diabetic Friendly Thanksgiving Recipe: Buttermilk Cornbread Dressing

/ Diabetic Friendly Thanksgiving Recipe: Buttermilk Cornbread Dressing Diabetic Friendly Thanksgiving Recipe: Buttermilk Cornbread Dressing Dressing is hands-down my favorite thing about Thanksgiving. Forget about the turkey and mashed potatoes! If I could only eat onefood on Thanksgiving day, my decision would be simple: cornbread dressing, also known as stuffing. It is the best thing ever! This recipe is going to be a version of the dressing that we all grew up with, butStevia is substituted for the sugarto help your friends and loved ones who might haveto watch their sugar intake. This delectable stuffing is appropriate for a diabetic diet and itwill bea healthyalternative without sacrificing the flavor. cup flat leaf Italian parsley, finely chopped Make cornbread by combining all ingredients together in a large bowl. Mix until ingredients come together and place into a 10-inch cast iron skillet that has been heated with one tablespoon of butter in the bottom. Bake in oven preheated to 425 degrees for about 25 to 35 minutes or until golden brown (test by inserting a toothpick into the middle ). Allow to cool before crumbling for dressing. This can be made in advance. In a large saut pan on medium heat, melt butter and add onions, celery and garlic. Slowly sweat vegetables until fragrant and translucent. Add fresh herbs. In a large bowl crumble cornbread into large chunks. Add chicken stock, eggs and salt and pepper. Mix until incorporated. Lower oven temperature to 375 degrees and pour mixture intoa lightly greased casserole dish andbake for 45 minutes or until golden brown. Continue reading >>

Healthy Cornbread Stuffing, Diabetic Friendly, With Pecans And Sausage

Healthy Cornbread Stuffing, Diabetic Friendly, With Pecans And Sausage

Healthier Cornbread Dressing with Homemade Cornbread, Low Glycemic Recipe Food can help you discover things about yourself. I married a Southern guy. He married an Italian girl. Hes been a lot more willing to come over to myself of the table than I have been to his. Take cornbread dressing for example. If Im going to stuff myself, I want it on my terms, bread stuffing, the stuff I grew up on. But for fifteen years I would see his eyes light up at the thought of cornbread dressing, a dish I was completely unfamiliar with until I moved to Nashville. For the first few ten years I wouldnt even taste it. Im not sure what I was holding onto. Maybe it was my own family memories. I remember my first Thanksgiving in Nashville as the saddest Thanksgiving of my life. It rained and we had to drive the hour and half to his familys house. The day was marred by a dark family matter and a discussion of a wedding to take place in a funeral home (it never happened). Thanksgiving dinner is a bit sacred, and can hurt when spent with people that feel like strangers. I missed my brother and I remember crying all the way home. I wanted to leave Nashville, leave the family I married in to, because I didnt feel like I belonged. I wanted to take my husband with me and run back to California, because even though my family wasnt there, I left my friends who loved me. Refusing to get involved with cornbread dressing was my way of holding onto what I missed about my life. This year I decided to make cornbread dressing for my husband and for you. It now means Im all the way in. After all, I wrote the Nashville bucket list for the Nashville Arts & Entertainment Magazine. The Process for Healthier Cornbread Dressing In order to make a good cornbread dressing, first make good old fashioned corn bread. Continue reading >>

Carrot-mushroom Stuffing

Carrot-mushroom Stuffing

3 cups coarsely shredded carrots (6 medium) Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. In a large skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Add mushrooms. Cook for 5 to 8 minutes or just until tender, stirring occasionally. Add green onions for the last 1 minute of cooking. Remove from heat. Stir in soy sauce, oregano, rosemary, and pepper. In a very large bowl, combine mushroom mixture, bread cubes, and carrots. Drizzle with enough of the broth to moisten. Place stuffing in an ungreased 2- to 2 1/2-quart au gratin or baking dish. Cover with foil and bake for 45 to 55 minutes or until heated through. (Or to use to stuff a 10- to 12-pound turkey, prepare as above, except use 3/4 to 1 cup broth instead of 1 to 1 1/4 cups broth. Spoon lightly into turkey neck and body cavities; do not pack. Internal temperature of stuffing should register 165 degrees F on an instant-read thermometer.) Makes 12 (3/4-cup) servings. Make-ahead directions: Prepare as directed through step 2. Place in a 2- to 2 1/2-quart au gratin or baking dish. Cover and chill up to 24 hours. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Bake casserole, covered, for 60 to 70 minutes or until heated through. (For safety reasons, do not make stuffing ahead if planning to use for stuffing a turkey.) *To dry whole grain bread: Cut enough slices of whole grain bread into 1/2-inch cubes to equal 8 cups (10 to 12 slices). Spread out in a shallow baking pan. Bake, uncovered, in 300 degrees oven about 15 minutes or until dry and crisp, stirring twice. Cool. You should have about 6 cups dried bread cubes. PER SERVING: 130 cal., 3 g total fat (1 g sat. fat), 225 mg sodium, 24 g carb. (4 g fiber, 4 g sugars), 4 g pro. Continue reading >>

Basic Bread Stuffing

Basic Bread Stuffing

I have never made stuffing from scratch before in my life. This recipe was so easy and soooooo good. I'm not a stuffing eatter, but I got nothing but compliments and an empty dish by the time Th... Ours turned out too dry - could be our fault. The recipe didn't call for it, but I think it should have been covered (we cooked ours outside the bird). I'll try it that way next time and see if ... I used challah bread because I forgot to buy the bread for this, plus I added dried cranberries and toasted walnuts to this for Christmas 2001. It was really, really easy and tasted great. I pl... I cooked the onions first. Almost to a carmelized affect, then added a tablespoon of sugar and 3 tablespoons of butter in with the onions in the pan. On the side I tore off fresh bread into cube... This was a very simple recipe to follow! I toasted bread before cutting, I used vegetable broth instead of Chicken, 2 onions, a pinch of cayenne, and real egg. Used it in a broccoli casserole d... Pretty Good. I added mushrooms & it was kind of gluppy so I broke up the glup pieces half-way through cooking. I think my bread crumbs weren't fresh enough also. Not really the recipe's fault. I reduced the whole wheat bread to 3 cups and added 3 cups of corn toasting bread. I also added chopped chestnuts, which I roasted (1 lb unshelled) before adding to the mixture. While everyone... 1 tablespoon of paprika?Maybe other reviewers only added a teaspoon, I did a double take and then eventually trusted the recipe which was a big mistake. I made it outside of a turkey and it cam... I use this basic recipe but use poultry seasoning, and also add 2 celery stalks chopped fine, as well as a small onion chopped fine. Ads great flavor and all are healthy. I omit the egg...stil... Continue reading >>

Low Carb Stuffing | Diabetic Connect

Low Carb Stuffing | Diabetic Connect

Salt - start with 1/2 teaspoon, or 1 T chicken or turkey soup base (see below) 1 cup water or broth, plus more according to moisture needed 1 - 3 eggs if baking it, and if desired (nutritional info includes 1 egg) Make low-carb stuffing bread, or use about 1 - 1 lb loaf of low-carb bread. Different types of bread will bring different results, so you may have to adjust the amount of liquid, seasonings, etc. I based the nutritional information below on using my homemade stuffing bread. In any case, allow the bread to dry out for awhile, either on the counter on in a low oven. It doesn't have to be totally dry, just kind of stale-level dry. 2. Saute' onion, celery, and pepper until soft. Add parsley and cook for a minute or so, until wilted. Add seasonings. I include about a Tablespoon of Better Than Bouillon Soup Base at this point. 3. Mix together the vegetables and the bread. Add a cup of broth or water, stir, and taste. Adjust seasoning and moisture. If you're going to stuff poultry with it, leave it on the dry side because it will absorb a lot of juices during cooking. You can eat it just as it is, but if you bake it, the flavors will come together better. Adding egg will make it come together in more of a melded together form. I usually add one egg, but don't like it too melded. You can add 2, or even three eggs. Mix well and bake at 350 F. for about half an hour, or until browned on top. Continue reading >>

Stuffing Recipe | Diabetes Diet Dialogue

Stuffing Recipe | Diabetes Diet Dialogue

Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information! (TM) Ive pretty much maxxed-out the time for research on a diabetic safe-menu for Thanksgiving. Im disappointed in what I found from sites purporting to be diabetic experts. So, I decided to piggy-back my recipe gathering for my blog and my own table to see what I could find. I will give you a list of some of the best recipes I found and strategies that I think will work for diabetics, but as I still have to make up my own shopping list, get the groceries and cook a meal both Thursday and Friday, I will be as brief as possible. I apologize. If you dont get to this in time, then use these guidelines and options for entertaining in December. 1. Start your holiday meal with a soup courseand then a salad course! Doing this lets you fill up on healthier foods first, and then graze or dabble with smaller, portion-tastes of all but your absolute favorites (be sure to still use a moderate portion of those). The key here is not to overwork your pancreas in its efforts to provide alkaline buffers for your food, beforefood enters your body to nourish you. 2. The more leafy veggies and non-root vegetables you eat, the less calorie dense the meal will be, and the more you will be helping to create an Alkaline Reserve for the meal; two root vegetables are excellent alkaline foods organic potatoes (only if you include the skin)and organic sweet potatoes; use them in moderation. You can click the link below in Referencefor my food charts to see the most alkaline foods. Alkaline foods need to be included to help to balance the pH of all the animal foods and sugars which are rife in these holiday meals, usually. IncludeRAW fruits and vegetables as much as possible as their enzymes will also aid your digestion and help to increase the nu Continue reading >>

Simple Bread Stuffing

Simple Bread Stuffing

4 cups dry whole wheat bread cubes Approximately 6 slices of whole wheat bread Pour water in a saucepan, bring water to boil and add bouillon cube. Stir until bouillon is dissolved. Add diced onion and celery to bouillon and simmer for 5 minutes. Pour bouillon mixture over bread and toss gently until moisened. Use as stuffing or bake in 8 square dish at 325F for 20-25 minutes. ADW Diabetes is a diabetic supply mail order company that is dedicated to keeping diabetes management affordable. ADW takes a leading role in offering free diabetic education through Destination Diabetes , an informational component of the ADW website featuring tips and advice from diabetes and nutrition experts, diabetic recipes and more. ADW Diabetes is a diabetic supply mail order company that is dedicated to keeping diabetes management affordable. ADW takes a leading role in offering free diabetic education through Destination Diabetes , an informational component of the ADW website featuring tips and advice from diabetes and nutrition experts, diabetic recipes and more. Your email address will not be published. What To Do With Insulin When Your Diabetic Pet Is Vomiting Or Not Eating posted on June 25, 2015 | under Pet Care , Pet Diabetes , Pet Diet & Nutrition , Pet Newsletter The information on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own physician or other health professional. You should not use the information contained on this site for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication. You should read carefully all product packaging. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or susp Continue reading >>

Loaded Bread Stuffing

Loaded Bread Stuffing

1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper (optional) 12 cups light whole wheat bread cut into 1-inch pieces and dried* 1 8 - ounce can water chestnuts, drained and chopped 1 cup coarsely shredded carrots (2 medium) 1 14 1/2 - ounce can reduced-sodium chicken broth 1/2 cup refrigerated or frozen egg product, thawed, or 2 eggs, lightly beaten Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. In a large skillet melt butter over medium heat. Add mushrooms, celery, onion, sweet pepper, and garlic. Cook 6 to 8 minutes or until vegetables are tender, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat. Stir in sage, black pepper, and, if desired, crushed red pepper. In a very large bowl combine bread cubes, water chestnuts, and carrots. Add mushroom mixture; toss to combine. Add broth and egg, tossing lightly to combine. Spoon into a 3-quart casserole. Bake, covered with foil, 50 to 55 minutes or until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center registers 160 degrees F. *Test Kitchen Tip: To make dried bread cubes, preheat oven to 300 degrees F. Spread bread cubes in a shallow roasting pan. Bake 10 to 15 minutes or until cubes are dry, stirring twice; cool. Cubes will continue to dry and crisp as they cool. (Or let bread cubes stand, loosely covered, at room temperature 8 to 12 hours.) PER SERVING: 108 cal., 4 g total fat (2 g sat. fat), 8 mg chol., 227 mg sodium, 13 g carb. (4 g fiber, 3 g sugars), 6 g pro. Continue reading >>

A Diabetic-friendly Thanksgiving Menu From Chef Tom Valenti

A Diabetic-friendly Thanksgiving Menu From Chef Tom Valenti

A Diabetic-Friendly Thanksgiving Menu from Chef Tom Valenti [Photographs from left: CountryLiving and Amazon ] Chef-restaurateur Tom Valenti of Ouest in New York City knows what delicious is better than most chefs I know. He's also a diabetic. In fact, he co-wrote a terrific cookbook, You Don't Have to be Diabetic to Love This Cookbook . So when he e-mailed me a couple of weeks ago asking if we wanted to post some Thanksgiving-appropriate recipes from the book we of course said yes. Here's what Tom had to say about each of the dishes: I've done a lot of original things with bacon in my time, but I cannot claim credit for the combination of bacon and Brussels sprouts. Nonetheless, I had to include it in this book because I never tire of it, and the dish loses very little when made with diabetes-friendly turkey bacon. These Brussels sprouts go well with just about anything and are a must at Thanksgiving dinner. Cooking sweet cippolini onions with balsamic vinegar until the vinegar is reduced produces an irresistible sweet and sour effect. These are delicious with calf's liver and other full-flavored meats, poultry, and game. I've been making a version of this stuffing for years, and it's one of the things I love and look forward to most when Thanksgiving rolls around. One of the stuffing's many appealing attributes is that it will fill your home with the smells of good cooking - first the toasted pine nuts and then the sausage, vegetables, white wine and herbs. Once the stuffing is in the oven, your senses and those of the people watching the ball game in the next room will be utterly, fully engaged. Of course, given our reason for being there together, I have to skimp on the bread a bit, but never fear: Mushrooms do a good job of making up for volume, while adding anoth Continue reading >>

Recipe - Old-fashioned Bread And Sage Dressing - Recipes For Diabetics

Recipe - Old-fashioned Bread And Sage Dressing - Recipes For Diabetics

teaspoon (2.5 to 5 ml) crushed dried sage 1-pound (480 g) loaves firm white bread, cut into 1/2-inch slices cups (560 to 720 ml) 98% fat-free, no-salt-added canned chicken broth Preheat oven to 325F (160C), Gas Mark 3. Melt margarine in a large nonstick skillet. Add celery and onion. Saut until vegetables are very tender, about 10 minutes. Stir in thyme, sage, salt (if using), and pepper. Set aside. Meanwhile, place bread slices on a baking sheet and lightly toast on both sides, about 10 minutes per side. Break bread into bite-size pieces. Mix in vegetable mixture and parsley. (At this point stuffing can be made 1 day ahead, placed in a self-sealing plastic bag, and refrigerated). In a medium saucepan, heat broth to a simmer. Place dressing mixture in a large mixing bowl. Pour on hot broth and stir until bread is evenly moistened, starting with 2 1/2 cups broth and adding additional broth to reach desired consistency. Transfer dressing mixture to a shallow baking casserole. Cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover and continue to bake until lightly browned and heat through, another 15 to 20 minutes. 116 calories (20% calories from fat), 4 g protein, 3 g total fat (0.6 g saturated fat), 20 g carbohydrates, 1 g dietary fiber, 0 cholesterol, 237 mg sodium Continue reading >>

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