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Strength Training And Diabetes Prevention

Lifting Weights And Diabetes - The Active Times

Lifting Weights And Diabetes - The Active Times

Diabetes, the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S., is not a disease of blood sugar. If that was the case and eating too much sweet stuff caused the condition, then every child will have it. Diabetes is a disease of insulin, a hormone the pancreas produces to help the body use sugar (glucose) from the carbs in the food for energy or store it for the future. More than 29 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the population, have the illness, according to the American Diabetes Association . About 8 million of them are not diagnosed. Another million and a half people in the country are diagnosed every year. Prevention efforts have usually been focused on losing weight , staying physically active and eating healthy . You can add weight lifting to that list. A study by Harvard and the University of Southern Denmark suggests that men who do weight training regularlyfor example, for 30 minutes per day, five days per weekmay be able to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes by up to 34 percent. Strength training is one of the most effective ways to regain or increase insulin sensitivity and reverse insulin resistance. This all boils down to the ability of the body to transport glucose into the cells to be used, Jason Chirichigno, MD from One Medical Group in Los Angeles says.Both weight training and physical activity stimulate the molecular signaling pathways that get glucose into the cell, he adds. The second issue with type 2diabetes (insulin resistance) outside of the metabolic issues is the pro-inflammatory state of the body which once again interferes with the bodys ability to get that glucose into the cells. Resistance training has been shown to increase the transporters that carry glucose in. Thats why combining weight training and aerobic exercise running , brisk walkin Continue reading >>

Strength Training: A Great Tool For Diabetes Management

Strength Training: A Great Tool For Diabetes Management

Strength Training: A Great Tool for Diabetes Management Aerobic exercise is often promoted as a way to manage type 2 diabetes, but adding strength training to your workout plan is important, too. Here's whyand how to get started. Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . If you are staying active by focusing on aerobic exercise, you may not be reaping all the benefits of an effective type 2 diabetes exercise plan. Aerobic exercise is terrific it can improve heart health and lower your risk for heart attack or stroke. But strengthening your muscles is another important part of staying healthy when you have type 2 diabetes. When you exercise with weights or other forms of resistance, it can be especially helpful for controlling blood sugar levels . A lot of the resistance training actually improves insulin sensitivity, says Dawn Sherr, RD, a certified diabetes educator with the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Your blood sugar may not be as elevated if you develop more muscles. When you do strength training exercises that target muscles, your body uses glucose from your bloodstream to power them, which can help clear out excess sugar from your system. It actually signals the glucose to enter the muscle cells, says Joey Gochnour, MEd, RD, LD, a nutritionist and certified personal trainer with the Division of Recreational Sports at the University of Texas in Austin. Toned muscles also store glucose more effectively, and that helps regulate blood sugar even when youre at rest. Strength training also helps build stronger bones, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). And it promotes weight loss an important goal for many with type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

The Best Workout To Fight Prediabetes

The Best Workout To Fight Prediabetes

If you're one of the nearly 50% of Americans with diabetes or pre-diabetes , chances are you've heard the advice to exercise regularly: The science is clear that physical activity is an excellent way to help keep your blood sugar under control. But now, research reveals even better news: You can tailor your workouts to target blood sugar and shed pounds. Make the most of your sweat sessions with these 3 guidelines. Longer workouts aren't necessarily better, suggests recent research from Canada's University of Western Ontario. To compare long, steady efforts to short, intense bursts of activity, researchers asked people with type 2 diabetes to get 30 minutes of moderate exercise (65% of target heart rate) or to split up three 10-minute bouts of vigorous exercise (85% of target heart rate), 5 days a week for 3 months. The result: The 10-minute workouts had a bigger impact on diabetes patients' health. They improved hemoglobin (a marker of blood sugar) levels by twice as much as the continuous exercisers. They also doubled their drop in LDL, or "bad," cholesterol while lowering body mass index (a measure of height versus weight) by three times as much. Those assigned to the short-burst group also exercised longer on average, logging about 100 more minutes per month. "Shorter workouts are easier for people to fit into their schedules," explains lead researcher Avinash Pandey, an undergraduate student. However, even when the time exercised was the same, the benefits to short bursts still held up. One theory is that higher-intensity workouts burn more calories and fat, and that has a more dramatic effect on blood sugar. ( Prevention's Fit in 10 DVD is exactly what you need to transform your body and health in just 10 minutes a daycheck it out!) MORE: 10 Exercises That Burn M Continue reading >>

Jeffrey Janot, M.s. And Len Kravitz, Ph.d.

Jeffrey Janot, M.s. And Len Kravitz, Ph.d.

Training Clients With Diabetes Jeffrey Janot, M.S. and Len Kravitz, Ph.D. Introduction The incidence of diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease, is a growing problem in the American population. To date, 16 million Americans have diabetes, either known or unknown, with 1,700 new cases being diagnosed everyday (Nieman 1998). Diabetes has been linked to the development of a variety of diseases including heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and neurological disorders. The cause of death in individuals with diabetes is not the disorder itself, but from the diseases associated with it, most notably heart disease. Diabetes is classified into two categories: Type I and Type II. Typically, Type I diabetes occurs in younger individuals (not always!) and comprises approximately 10% of all diabetic cases. Thereby, 90% of the cases are Type II, which is most common in older individuals. Effective management and prevention strategies for diabetes are of utmost importance. As exercise professionals, you can play a crucial role within these strategies, working collaboratively with other skilled health professionals. It should be noted that there are a number of opportunities for personal trainers to enhance their professional knowledge, such as obtaining clinical-type certifications (ACE clinical exercise specialist, ACSM exercise specialist, etc.). This article will present recommendations and clinical considerations for the development of a safe strength training program for individuals with diabetes. A brief discussion of the pathophysiology behind diabetes will be presented first, followed by specific exercise prescription guidelines for strength training. In addition, Table 1 summaries some cardiorespiratory guidelines according to frequency, intensity, time and type Continue reading >>

Strength Training May Help Reduce Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Strength Training May Help Reduce Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Strength Training May Help Reduce Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes If you're young and fit, type 2 diabetes may not be on your radarbut it could be in the future. The disease has seen an epidemic-proportion increase in prevalence in the U.S. over the last few decades, and it's currently the seventh leading cause of death. Well, here's some awesome news on how you can potentially prevent it: Muscle-strengthening exercise may significantly reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. A new report published in PLoS Medicine this week says that middle-aged and older women who completed more than 150 minutes per week of muscle-strengthening activity had a 30 to 40 percent lower risk for type 2 diabetes than did women who did zero muscle-strengthening work. That's pretty cool, because while we already knew that aerobic exercise helps reduce T2D risk, we weren't sure if anaerobic exercise had a link to the disease. "While it is well established that aerobic exercise is beneficial for diabetes prevention, it was unknown to what extent muscle-strengthening type activity would confer benefit," study author Anders Grontved, MPH, told SELF. "An important message from our study is that for those women who have difficulty in adhering or engaging in aerobic activity, muscle-strengthening type activity such as resistance exercise could be a valuable alternative with respect to diabetes prevention." So why are weights so great for reducing one's diabetes risk? Could be that strengthening your muscles helps improve their sensitivity to insulin, says Dr. Grontved. (Just a quick lil' health lesson: With type 2 diabetes, either your body doesn't produce enough insulina hormone that regulates blood sugaror your cells ignore it, which causes your blood glucose levels to rise to unhealthy lev Continue reading >>

Strength Training Delivers Health Benefits (watch Now)

Strength Training Delivers Health Benefits (watch Now)

Strength Training Delivers Health Benefits (Watch Now) (Caption: Fitness expert from Mariners Hospital Wellness Center offers strength-training tips.) Looking to reduce pain, improve bone density or burn calories? Strength training can deliver relief from many chronic conditions, according to research from Tufts University and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (the CDC) . Strength training is a type of exercise that uses weights (including your bodys own weight) as resistance to build stronger muscles. Examples of strength training include: weight-lifting, yoga, pushups, workouts with tension bands, according to fitness experts at Mariners Hospital Wellness Center . From diabetes control to improving bone density, the CDC lists a wide number of conditions that benefit from strength training. The list includes: Arthritis: Reduces pain and stiffness, and increases strength and flexibility Osteoporosis: Builds bone density and reduces risk for falls. Heart disease: Reduces cardiovascular risk by improving lipid profile and overall fitness. Obesity: Increases metabolism, which helps burn more calories and helps with long-term weight control Back pain: Strengthens back and abdominal muscles to reduce stress on the spine. Continue reading >>

Prevent Type 2 Diabetes With Resistance Exercise

Prevent Type 2 Diabetes With Resistance Exercise

Prevent Type 2 Diabetes With Resistance Exercise In 1985 only about thirty million people worldwide suffered from type 2 diabetes. By 2010 that number grew to over 285 million, which is almost equivalent to the entire population of the United States. This shows a disturbing trend. Diabetes and its bastard cousin obesity are two of the largest health problems in America today. While weve known for years that regular aerobic exercise helps prevent diabetes, the role of resistance training has been less clear. Todays study published in PLOS Medicine shows quite definitively that resistance training of any type can help prevent diabetes. Researchers examined data from a long-term study of nurses in the United States. The study followed almost 100,000 female nurses for eight years. The women recorded their daily activities in great detail, including any exercise they did. The results show that any type of resistance exercise decreased the likelihood of developing diabetes . The researchers defined resistance exercise very loosely. The way this study was conducted, any type of muscle-strengthening routine that wasnt aerobic exercise was counted as resistance exercise. That means yoga, pilates, bodybuilding, strength training, weightlifting, and CrossFit were all classified under the same category. Thats great news, because it means the resistance exercise necessary to prevent diabetes can come from almost any activity. Before you get out the pitchforks, remember that were talking about exercise as a goal to prevent disease. Nobody is saying that all those activities will achieve the same physical results. But it appears they could all be equally effective in simply preventing diabetes. The study also revealed that more resistance exercise resulted in less risk of diabetes, b Continue reading >>

Weight Training Reduces Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

Weight Training Reduces Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

Weight Training Reduces Risk for Type 2 Diabetes According to a new published study , men regularly participate in weight training or resistance training may be able to lower their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and the University performed the study that is published in the first online issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. The study consisted of data on 32,002 men who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1990 to 2008. This data included questionnaires about how much weight training and exercise they were performing each week and was filled out by the participants every two years. During the study period, 2,278 of the men were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. After an adjustment of influencing factors such as physical activity and diet, among other things, the researchers discovered a dose-response between weight training and reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. 1 The men who completed up to 59 minutes of weight training per week had a 12% reduced risk for type 2 diabetes. When the time increased to between 60 to 149 minutes of training, the risk was reduced by 25%, and reduced even further, by 34%, when doing at least 150 minutes of weight training per week. The relationship was very similar with aerobic exercise. Up to 59 minutes of aerobic exercise reduced the risk for type 2 diabetes by 7%, and doing 60 to 149 minutes reduced the risk by 31%. Doing at least 150 minutes of aerobic exercise reduced the risk by 52%. 2 Researchers also found that weight training in conjunction with aerobic exercise had the greatest effect: men who did more than 150 minutes of aerobic exercise, and also at least 150 minutes of weight training every week had a 59% reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Resistance Training For Diabetes Prevention And Therapy: Experimental Findings And Molecular Mechanisms

Resistance Training For Diabetes Prevention And Therapy: Experimental Findings And Molecular Mechanisms

Resistance Training for Diabetes Prevention and Therapy: Experimental Findings and Molecular Mechanisms 1Institute for Nutritional Sciences and Physiology, University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, A-6060 Hall in Tirol, Eduard Wallnoefer-Zentrum 1, Austria 2Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA 1Institute for Nutritional Sciences and Physiology, University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, A-6060 Hall in Tirol, Eduard Wallnoefer-Zentrum 1, Austria 2Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA Received 2013 Oct 31; Accepted 2013 Dec 9. Copyright 2013 B. Strasser and D. Pesta. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is characterized by insulin resistance, impaired glycogen synthesis, lipid accumulation, and impaired mitochondrial function. Exercise training has received increasing recognition as a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of T2D. Emerging research suggests that resistance training (RT) has the power to combat metabolic dysfunction in patients with T2D and seems to be an effective measure to improve overall metabolic health and reduce metabolic risk factors in diabetic patients. However, there is limited mechanistic insight into how these adaptations occur. This review provides an overview of the intervention data on the impact of RT on glucose metabolism. In addition, the molecular mechanisms that lead to adapt Continue reading >>

Resistance Training And Diabetes: The Importance Of Muscular Strength

Resistance Training And Diabetes: The Importance Of Muscular Strength

Resistance Training and Diabetes: The Importance of Muscular Strength by Kurt Escobar, MA and Len Kravitz, PhD on Oct 07, 2016 Resistance training can be a big help to people who either have type 2 diabetes or are at risk of developing it. Ideally, trainers should combine cardiovascular and resistance training to help clients prevent or manage type 2 diabetes, but cardiovascular exercise isnt always a good fit. In those cases, resistance training may be the only option available. Theres no denying that diabetes is a serious health challenge. The World Health Organization (2015) estimates that 9% of adults worldwide have diabetes. Furthermore, 86 million Americans (more than 1 in 3) have prediabetesan elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetesand nearly 90% of them dont know they have it (ADA 2016). Left untreated, 15%30% of people with prediabetes will develop diabetes within 5 years (ADA 2016). Fortunately, prediabetes can be reversed with exercise, weight loss and dietary changes (ADA 2016). This makes it imperative for fitness professionals to stay abreast of the most recent evidence-based exercise research to best prevent or manage type 2 diabetes. Ishiguro et al. (2016) note that cardiovascular training is the traditional exercise for improving the metabolic profiles of patients with type 2 diabetes. These researchers say resistance training has gained a lot of attention recently because it can improve glycemic control, maintain bone mineral density, increase muscular strength and prevent osteoporosis. Unfortunately, Ishiguro et al. add, not all patients can get enough regular cardiovascular exercise to optimize health benefits. Thus, resistance training may be a first choice of exercise for some people with type 2 diabetes. Before we explore specific exercises f Continue reading >>

Lifting Weights May Protect Men Against Type 2 Diabetes

Lifting Weights May Protect Men Against Type 2 Diabetes

By Ryan Jaslow CBS News August 7, 2012, 11:56 AM Lifting weights may protect men against Type 2 diabetes You'll obliterate more calories if you lift weights after cardio (not before), says a study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.More from Health.com: The 7 best fat blasters (CBS News) Men who lift weights may have more to gain than bigger biceps: A new study finds pumping iron may protect men against Type 2 diabetes. The study, published online August 6 in the Archives of Internal Medicine , involved 32,000 men who were followed from 1990 to 2008. Researchers from Harvard University in Boston and the University of Southern Denmark in Odense teamed up to examine the role exercise and weight training had on men's risk for the disease that affects an estimated 346 million people worldwide. People with Type 2 diabetes can't control their blood sugar because they are resistant to insulin, possibly as a result of obesity because increased fat makes it harder for the body to use insulin properly. Previous research suggests aerobic exercise, such as jogging or running, may reduce diabetes risk. The new study identified 2,278 people out of the participant pool who developed diabetes over the study period. After adjusting for other factors, such as television viewing habits , family history of diabetes, smoking and diet, the researchers categorized all the men into three groups according to how much weight training they engaged in each week: between 1 and 59 minutes, 60 and 149 minutes and 150 minutes or more of weekly weightlifting. The analysis showed that lifting weights reduced men's diabetes risk by 12 percent, 25 percent and 34 percent respectively in the three groups, suggesting the more times a person worked out, the better the diabetes protection. N Continue reading >>

Strength Training Significantly Reduces Your Diabetes Risk

Strength Training Significantly Reduces Your Diabetes Risk

By Dr. Mercola Exercise is a well-known tool for helping to prevent type 2 diabetes, but typically the focus is on aerobic exercise. While this certainly has its place, especially in the form of high-intensity interval training, another form of beneficial exercise is often overlooked: strength training. Men who engage in regular strength training slash their type 2 diabetes risk, and the benefit increases with the amount of strength training per week, according to new research.1 For instance: Men who did strength training for 1-59 minutes per week reduced their risk by 12 percent Strength training for 60-149 minutes a week lowered risk by 25 percent Strength training for at least 150 minutes a week lowered risk by 34 percent Weight training reduced diabetes risk independent of aerobic exercise. But when the strength training was combined with aerobic exercise, the benefit grew even more, with men engaging in more than 150 minutes of aerobic exercise and at least 150 minutes of strength training per week experiencing a 59 percent reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. And the news gets even better. Among men already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, a second study revealed that regular physical activity could extend their lifespan. Even moderately active men with diabetes had a 38 percent lower risk of dying from any cause, and a 49 percent lower risk of dying from heart disease, than sedentary men.2 Why is Strength Training so Effective? There is no doubt that building your muscle mass with strength training should be one of the goals of your fitness routine. It's even been found to lower your cancer risk by 40 percent,3 in addition to the diabetes benefits mentioned above. As far as exercise for diabetes goes, it works so well because it is one of the fastest and most powerful Continue reading >>

Weight-lifting Reduces Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: Study

Weight-lifting Reduces Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: Study

Weight-lifting reduces risk of type 2 diabetes: study Pumping weights five times a week can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by a third and if combined with aerobic exercise can curt the risk by almost 60 per cent, a study has found. Exercising with weights can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, a study has suggested. Even small amounts of weight training had an effect on type 2 diabetes, it was found, which is important for those people who cannot cope with aerobic exercise, the authors said. However, combining both weight training and aerobic exercise gave the biggest benefits, they said. Type 2 diabetes affects around two million people in Britain, many of which do not know they have it. It is largely associated with being overweight and substantially increases the risk of suffering a heart attack. The researchers from Havard School of Public Health in Boston, America and the University of Southern Denmark, followed 32,000 men for 18 years. The benefits of weight training and aerobic exercise were independent of each other, meaning participants reduced their risk of diabetes by only doing one, but the combined effects were greater, it was found. The findings were published online in Archives of Internal Medicine. Lead author Anders Grntved, visiting researcher in the Department of Nutrition at HSPH and a doctoral student in exercise epidemiology at the University of Southern Denmark, said: "Until now, previous studies have reported that aerobic exercise is of major importance for type 2 diabetes prevention. "But many people have difficulty engaging in or adhering to aerobic exercise. These new results suggest that weight training, to a large extent, can serve as an alternative to aerobic exercise for type 2 diabetes prevention." The participants were asked to fil Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

Resistance Training For Diabetes Prevention And Therapy: Experimental Findings And Molecular Mechanisms

Resistance Training For Diabetes Prevention And Therapy: Experimental Findings And Molecular Mechanisms

BioMed Research International Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 805217, 8 pages 1Institute for Nutritional Sciences and Physiology, University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, A-6060 Hall in Tirol, Eduard Wallnoefer-Zentrum 1, Austria 2Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA Academic Editor: Pierpaolo De Feo Copyright © 2013 Barbara Strasser and Dominik Pesta. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is characterized by insulin resistance, impaired glycogen synthesis, lipid accumulation, and impaired mitochondrial function. Exercise training has received increasing recognition as a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of T2D. Emerging research suggests that resistance training (RT) has the power to combat metabolic dysfunction in patients with T2D and seems to be an effective measure to improve overall metabolic health and reduce metabolic risk factors in diabetic patients. However, there is limited mechanistic insight into how these adaptations occur. This review provides an overview of the intervention data on the impact of RT on glucose metabolism. In addition, the molecular mechanisms that lead to adaptation in skeletal muscle in response to RT and that are associated with possible beneficial metabolic responses are discussed. Some of the beneficial adaptations exerted by RT include increased GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle, increased insulin sensitivity and hence restored metabolic flexibility. Increased energy expenditure and excess postexercise oxygen c Continue reading >>

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