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Store Bought Desserts For Diabetics

Easy No-bake Desserts

Easy No-bake Desserts

These no-bake dessert recipes are just what you need for a stress-free way to satisfy your sweet tooth. There's plenty of options for when you just can't bear to turn the oven on or it's already full of other goodies. These easy, no-bake desserts range from no-bake cheesecake recipes, like our Frozen Cheesecake Pie to no-bake Italian desserts, like our Lighter Tiramisu. And best of all, they are all diabetic-friendly, so you can rest assured we've got your best interests at heart! Our Cookies 'n' Cream Sandwiches are a breeze to make and they taste like you bought 'em in the store. Be sure to stack extra of this no-bake dessert in the freezer for those after-dinner cravings! Naked Cheesecake It's time for a treat that won't make you feel guilty! This layered dessert uses sugar-free ingredients and fresh strawberries for a refreshingly cool summer treat. But you don't have to reserve our Strawberry Charlotte for warmer weather, it also makes a great potluck dessert! Creamy Lime Pie This Orange Cream Pie is delightfully refreshing. By using fat-free and reduced-fat ingredients, you won't have to feel guilty after indulging in this tasty treat! "Berry-licious" Parfait If you're looking for the ultimate dessert presentation, make this Chocolate Peanut Butter Trifle in parfait glasses so the decadent layers can win you loads of raves! Tunnel of Love Cake Layers upon layers of creamy chocolate pudding, whipped topping and melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mint patties...sure sounds like something you wouldn't expect to find as a diabetes dessert recipe. But no worries... 'cause our Test Kitchen tweaked this scrumptious treat, and now you can enjoy it too! Creamy Dreamy Banana Pie A classic Tiramisu is unbeatable, but unfortunately, laden with fat and calories. Try our Lighter Tira Continue reading >>

31 Healthy Ways People With Diabetes Can Enjoy Carbs

31 Healthy Ways People With Diabetes Can Enjoy Carbs

Photo by cookieandkate.com Whether you've just been diagnosed with diabetes or you've been managing it like a pro for years, chances are you always need new recipes to add to your repertoire. Or maybe you have a family member/friend/date who has diabetes, and want to cook dinner for them. Fear not. You don't have to cook special, "diabetic" meals. Or, despite popular myths, obsessively avoid carbs. Many people think that if you have diabeetus (as Wilford Brimley would say) that means you can't eat carbohydrates. But, in fact, people with diabetes should get about 50% of their daily caloric intake from carbs — like anyone else looking to follow a healthy diet. You just need to consider three things before chowing down: the type of carb, adding a protein, and portion sizes. These factors all impact blood sugar and can help keep sugars within normal range (aka glycemic control), which is the ultimate goal in diabetes management. NBC Studios / Via uproxx.com Here's what's going on: When you eat carbs, your body breaks them down into sugar (aka glucose) which is used for energy. Glucose is the ideal energy source for most bodily functions, including — most important — brain power. And insulin is a hormone that takes care of keeping your blood glucose in a safe range by transporting glucose from the blood into your body's cells. When a person has diabetes, their insulin is either not working effectively, is being produced inefficiently, or in some cases not being produced at all (depending on the type of diabetes). As a result, they have elevated levels of glucose in the blood. That's likely where the whole no-carbs-or-sugar misconception came from. "Just don't eat carbs or sugar and you'll be fine," right? Nope. It's not a carb thing, it's an insulin thing. Your body d Continue reading >>

How The Wegmans Grocery Store Helped Me Reverse My Diabetes

How The Wegmans Grocery Store Helped Me Reverse My Diabetes

Author's Perspective: There's no doubt in my mind that having a full-service grocery store nearby helped me with my meal planning and being able to eat healthy every day. Whenever I conduct a diabetes workshop outside of the Northeast area of the United States, someone inevitably asks me the question: "What is a Wegmans?" Wegmans is a family-owned 75-store U.S. regional supermarket chain with stores in the mid-Atlantic region, including New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Northern Virginia, and Maryland. Wegmans Meets My Mother When I got out the hospital, my mother made me pack up all of my junk food, including potato chips, pretzels, cookies, candy bars, TV dinners, pizza pies, cakes, pies, soda, etc., and return these foods to the grocery store (Wegmans). As we walked into the store with my mother, she said: "Wow, this is a pretty big store for a grocery store!" As I struggled to push the 2 carts which were full of my junk food and beverages, a store clerk came up to us and asked" Can I help you?" I said "No, I'm okay - I need to return some food." The clerk just smiled and directed us to the proper area. As I continued to push the 2 carts to the proper area, another clerk approached us and offered to help me push the carts. Before I could say anything, she grabbed the handle of one of the carts and pushed it to the counter. After I thanked her, she just smiled and left. My mother turned to me and asked: "Are all the people in this store nice?" I said, "I think so -- whenever I have a question or I can't find something, there's always someone willing to help you. And, they never get mad at you for asking a question. They just smile and direct you to where you need to go. And, in some cases, they'll walk with you to make sure you get to the right aisle." Returning all Continue reading >>

Top 10 Convenient Store Bought, Low-carb Snacks

Top 10 Convenient Store Bought, Low-carb Snacks

We all know that convenience foods aren’t the best route to go especially if you’re on a low carb diet. Some of us just don’t have the luxury of being able to cook all the time, which makes it difficult to stay on-track with any diet. Below is our top 10, quick & easy ready to eat snacks found at most convenient stores – no preparation required! 1. Almonds There are approximately 7 grams of carbs per quarter cup of raw almonds. “Research has shown that almonds may reduce the rise in glucose (blood sugar) and insulin levels after meals,” says Peggy O’Shea Kochenbach, MBA, RDN, LDN, a dietitian and consultant in Boston. 2. Sunflower and Pumpkin Seeds Another great choice are seeds which contains 2 to 3 grams of carbohydrate per ounce. Dry roasted sunflower seeds (without salt) have about 1.9g of carbs per serving. Make sure you read the labels since some flavored brand of sunflower seeds contains sugars and unhealthy trans fats. 3. Packets or Cans of Tuna Tuna is a great source of protein, contains zero carbohydrates, and is also a source of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. 4. Sugar-Free Gelatin Yearning for something sweet and fruity? Sugar-free gelatin will satisfy your craving for almost no calories and zero carbs. 5. Pistachios Eating a handful of pistachios makes a great tasty snack and is also healthy because it lowers the blood sugar level by slowing down the absorption of carbohydrates in the body. Read more about the health benefits of pistachios. 6. Carrot sticks Carrots are a good source of beta-carotene. Carrots makes a great snacks for diabetics as their carotenoid and vitamin A content helps protect your eyes from diabetic retinopathy or damage to the blood vessels in the eye from long-term diabetes. 7. Peanut butter Eating peanut butter may Continue reading >>

10 Go-to Diabetes-friendly Desserts

10 Go-to Diabetes-friendly Desserts

In addition to being relatively low-calorie and low-carb, the best diabetes-friendly desserts ought to be: Quick and easy to prepare, which will keep you from reaching for an even quicker less-healthy option. Made in small batches, which will keep the leftovers small to avoid the temptation to overindulge. Varied, which will help to keep you from getting bored with your meal plan Wondering how to work dessert into your diabetes meal plan? Read 7 Tips for Fitting in Sweets When You Have Diabetes. Here are ten suggestions for diabetes-friendly desserts that fit the bill. Especially when it's cold outside, a nice cup of hot chocolate can keep you warm - as well as satisfy your sweet tooth. This low-sugar combo clocks in at only 60 calories and 20 grams of carbohydrate. Sugar-free gelatin topped with 2 tbsp light or sugar-free whipped topping can be considered a "free dessert." It's especially fun to make a few different flavors of gelatin, cube them, and make colorful parfaits out of your gelatin and whipped topping. Sometimes the simplest ideas are the most delicious. Frozen grapes end up having a very slushy texture. You can freeze them in an air-tight container or sandwich bag. Bananas should be sliced and laid out flat on a cookie sheet lined with wax paper, then transferred to an airtight container once they're frozen. One small banana or 17 grapes will give you 60 calories and 15 grams of carbs. Hack those dessert-flavored, sugar-free yogurts (such as cheesecake and key lime pie) by popping them in the freezer. You can find these yogurts for less than 100 calories and about 12 grams of carbs. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Thanksgiving Desserts

Diabetic Thanksgiving Desserts

Almond Butter Chocolate Truffles You'll never crave a store-brand peanut butter and chocolate candy again with these homemade truffles. Made with almond butter and melted dark chocolate, you can add any toppings you like such as coconut, chopped nuts, cocoa powder, or dried fruit. Make a bunch of these to save in your fridge as a quick, sweet snack that won't make you crash later thanks to 8g of protein, 5.1g fiber, and little added sugar thanks to unsalted almonds, almond butter, and dark chocolate cacao. View Recipe: Almond Butter Chocolate Truffles Protein-Packed Cheese Board Enjoy this spread as an appetizer or dessert. Nuts and cheese pack in the protein while the fruit and chocolate add just the right amount of sweetness to satisfy your cravings. Not only does this cheese board pack in protein, there is more than 390mg of calcium per serving thanks to the cheese, almonds, and chocolate. Guests will love this lighter alternative to traditional Thanksgiving desserts. With 10 servings per cheese board, there's plenty for friends and family, but the recipe is easy to double if you need more. View Recipe: Protein-Packed Cheese Board Almond Butter Nice Cream A blend between frozen yogurt and ice cream, "nice" cream is the easiest and healthiest way to satisfy your sweet tooth. There's nothing better than the salty and sweet combination of nuts and chocolate. We've elevated this classic combo with creamy almond butter and high quality cocoa powder for 5.84g of protein, 5.32g fiber, and just 13.71g of sugar. Guests will love the taste of this alternative to traditional ice cream, and you'll love how quick and easy it is to make. View Recipe: Almond Butter Nice Cream Spiralized Cinnamon Apples with Greek Yogurt We’re kind of obsessed with spiralizing, so naturally we had Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cakes & Desserts

Diabetic Cakes & Desserts

Being diagnosed with diabetes may feel like a prison sentence if you have a strong sweet tooth. With a few modifications, however, it’s more than possible to have your cake and eat it, too. Sugar substitutes, low-calorie ingredients, smaller servings and lower-glycemic sweeteners are all helpful when designing a meal plan that includes appropriate desserts. Video of the Day Unless nutritional information is listed on the menu, you never quite know what you’re getting when you order dessert from a restaurant. When you prepare it yourself, however, you know exactly what goes into it and can even calculate the nutrition facts per serving. Instead of following recipes to the letter, make substitutions -- such as applesauce for some oil or skim milk for whole milk -- to reduce calories per serving without dramatically altering the taste of the final product. Use Sugar Substitutes Artificial sweeteners have major advantages in diabetic desserts. Most are hundreds of times sweeter than traditional table sugar, for example, so you can get by with much smaller amounts of them. Most also have no effect on your blood sugar levels, so it’s possible to sub them in for sugar and reduce carb and calorie counts. Joslin Diabetes Center Nutrition Diabetes Educator Gillian Arathuzik recommends using aspartame or sucralose as sugar substitutes, and “Diabetic Pastry Chef” caterer Stacey Harris suggests a blend of sucralose and traditional sugar in recipes. Desserts are carb-rich even in very small amounts and even when you use sugar substitutes, so plan to enjoy just a few bites rather than a few big helpings. To avoid temptation, portion out desserts right away, share them with a friend and store extras out of sight. It can help to think about portion sizes visually. According to Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

I’d be willing to bet that most everyone has been told—and therefore believes—that people with diabetes cannot have any sugar and are resigned to living without dessert for the rest of their lives. Well, as a Certified Diabetes Educator, I'm here to tell you that this is a myth. People with diabetes can eat sugar, desserts, and almost any food that contains caloric sweeteners (molasses, honey, maple syrup, and more). Why? Because people with diabetes can eat foods that contain carbohydrates, whether those carbohydrates come from starchy foods like potatoes or sugary foods such as candy. It’s best to save sweets and desserts for special occasions so you don’t miss out on the more nutritious foods your body needs. However, when you do decide to include a sweet treat, make sure you keep portions small and use your carbohydrate counting plan. No sugar ever again? No way! The idea that people with diabetes should avoid sugar is decades old. Logically, it makes sense. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar. Sugary foods cause blood sugar levels to increase. Therefore people with diabetes should avoid sugary foods in order to prevent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and keep their diabetes under control. However, simply avoiding sugary foods does not go very far in terms of controlling blood sugar. Here's why. After you eat, your blood sugar level (aka postprandial blood glucose level) is largely determined by the total amount of carbohydrate you ate, not the source of the carbohydrates eaten. There are two types of carbohydrates that elevate your blood sugar levels: sugar and starch. Both will elevate your blood glucose to roughly the same level (assuming you ate the same amount of each). For example, if you were to eat a ½ cup of regular ice cream (1 Continue reading >>

10 Kid Approved & Diabetic Friendly Snacks

10 Kid Approved & Diabetic Friendly Snacks

Any of you with kids know that the amount of requests kids make for a snack in a day is astronomical. Having both of my kids at home all summer long, many days it seems like my day consists of: make breakfast, clean up the kitchen, give the kids a snack, make lunch, clean up the kitchen, make a snack, make dinner, clean up the kitchen, fall into bed. Ok, I am exaggerating, but you get the point. Kids eat…A LOT! I always try to provide my kids with healthy snack options. I also like to keep snacks lower carb, so that my son’s blood sugar doesn’t peak too much in between meals, and so that it has time to stabilize before beginning another meal. I thought I would share a few ideas of what snack time looks like at our house, by giving you 10 sample snacks. In most, there is more than one snack idea. Exact carbohydrate calculations will vary, but I will give you the rough estimates of the food pictured. Freeze-Dried Fruit & Popcorn: My kids love freeze-dried fruit, and I love it because it is great to have on hand once our favorite seasonal fruits are no longer in season. I buy the single-serving bags and it makes for a great snack and/or addition to meals. Popcorn is a snack-time favorite at our household as well because it is so low carb. For 1 bag of freeze-dried fruit (containing blueberries, raspberries & strawberries), there are 10 g of carbs and 3 g of fiber. Total NET CARBS are 7 g. 1 cup of popcorn contains approximately 3 g of carbs and .5 g of fiber. Total NET CARBS are 2.5 g. Frutas secas y palomitas de maíz 1 bolsa de frutas secas congeladas (con arándanos, frambuesas y fresas), contiene 10 g de carbohidratos y 3 g de fibra. Total de carbohidratos: 7 g. 1 Taza de palomitas de maíz contiene aproximadamente 3 g de carbohidratos y 5 g de fibra. Total de ca Continue reading >>

10 Sugar Free Desserts For Diabetics

10 Sugar Free Desserts For Diabetics

Diabetes, medically referred as diabetes mellitus, is a group of metabolic medical condition in which a person has high levels of glucose or blood sugar in the body. The condition makes heart and circulatory problems more likely. Most people develop high blood pressure which can lead to stroke, blood vessel damage, kidney failure, etc. Complications of type 2 diabetes are associated with platelet and neurovascular unit dysfunction. Patients with a high level of blood sugar will typically experience frequent urination, increased thirst, and most of all, increasing hunger. In the last 5 years, there has been an estimated number of over 382 million people throughout the world with diabetes. Luscious cakes, chocolate pies, parfaits, all those mouthwatering desserts, does it really mean that a person with diabetes should give a farewell to these sweet temptations? That is not necessarily true all the time because there are sugar free desserts for diabetics! Sugar Free Desserts for Diabetics Most people who learned that they have diabetes would quit delicious desserts in fear of an impending doom and start a dull, strange new diet along with skipping dessert. Isn’t it frustrating to quit on something you love to have with you and has already become your routine ever since? The truth is you don’t have to quit dessert. We’ve listed below the best desserts for diabetics to make life more delicious. It should just be a matter of balancing what you eat instead of quitting on them. Don’t lose hope, you can still enjoy these delightful desserts even if you have diabetes. Indulge your sweet tooth with these 10 sugar-free desserts without bringing your sugar level to a roller coaster ride. Sugar-free and low amount of calorie can be a healthy way to eat mouthwatering desserts, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dessert

Diabetes And Dessert

Eating desserts with diabetes A popular misconception about diabetes is that it is caused by eating too many sugary foods. While sweets can and do affect your blood sugar, they do not cause you to develop diabetes. However, when you have diabetes, you must carefully monitor your carbohydrate intake. This is because carbohydrates are responsible for raising your blood sugar levels. While you can enjoy sugary foods when you have diabetes, it is important to do so in moderation and with some understanding of how it could impact your blood sugar. This includes sugars found in desserts. 10 Diabetes Diet Myths » When you have diabetes, your body is either not able to use insulin correctly or not able to make any or enough insulin. Some people with diabetes experience both of these issues. Problems with insulin can cause sugar to build up in your blood since insulin is responsible for helping sugar move from the blood and into the body’s cells. Foods that contain carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Carbohydrates need to be regulated when you have diabetes to help you manage your blood sugar. On nutrition labels, the term “carbohydrates” includes sugars, complex carbohydrates, and fiber. In desserts, a number of sweet-tasting ingredients can be added to enhance sweetness. While some foods, such as fruits, naturally contain sugars, most desserts have some type of sugar added to them. Many dessert labels will not list “sugar” as a key ingredient. Instead, they will list the ingredient as one or more of the following: dextrose fructose high-fructose corn syrup lactose malt syrup sucrose white granulated sugar honey agave nectar glucose maltodextrin These sugar sources are carbohydrates and will raise your blood sugar. They can be found in cookies, cakes, pies, puddings, ca Continue reading >>

11 Grab-and-go Snacks For Type 2 Diabetes

11 Grab-and-go Snacks For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 12 Snacks for Type 2 Diabetes When a case of the mid-afternoon munchies strikes, it can be tempting to reach for unhealthy snacks like chips, cookies, or a candy bar. But doing so is a surefire way to derail a day of healthy eating. The good news: Snacks don't have to be your diet downfall — they can actually help you stick with your diabetes meal plan as long as you choose wisely, says Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE, author of The Diabetes Comfort Food Diet. Healthy options can curb hunger and provide a boost of energy to get you through your day. The key is to plan ahead and keep the right snacks on hand so you aren't tempted to hit the vending machine. Cipullo usually recommends snacks that contain a mix of carbohydrates, protein, and healthy fats. The winning combination will fill you up and digest slowly in your body, helping to keep your blood sugar levels steady. Read on to discover 12 tasty, on-the-go options that you can stash in your bag or desk drawer so you’ll always have a satisfying snack on standby. Continue reading >>

Healthy Desserts For Your Diabetes Diet

Healthy Desserts For Your Diabetes Diet

You might think a diabetes diagnosis means you’ll have to skip dessert forever. “Not so,” says Lara Rondinelli-Hamilton, a certified diabetes educator at DuPage Medical Center in Chicago. “With a little planning, you can satisfy your sweet tooth while keeping your blood sugar under control.” But just how do you do that? There are several ways. Swap Other Carbs for Dessert “Everyone focuses on the sugar, but what’s really important is the total carbohydrates,” says Rondinelli-Hamilton, author of the American Diabetes Association cookbook Healthy Calendar Diabetic Cooking. “If you’d like to have a small piece of pie for dessert, skip the starchy vegetable during dinner,” she says. But she’s quick to point out that this isn’t something you should do on a regular basis. “Desserts and sweets don’t have the nutritional value that other foods do, so it’s best to save them for special occasions,” she says. Think Small Along with limiting how often you have dessert, you’ll also need to limit how much you eat -- and that can be a challenge. “Sugar sets off fireworks in your brain, making you crave more,” says Jessica Bennett, RD, a dietitian at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. Fighting the urge to overdo it takes a lot of effort. But there are ways to make it a little easier. “Set yourself up for success by buying desserts that are packaged as a single serving, like a sugar-free fudge pop or a small square of dark chocolate,” Rondinelli-Hamilton says. And be realistic. “If you can’t have cake in the house without eating the whole thing, don’t buy a cake,” she says. When you go out, check the menu for miniature desserts. Many restaurants now offer treats served in small dishes or shot glasses. “If that’s not Continue reading >>

Pumpkin Pie

Pumpkin Pie

Ingredients 1 9-inch chilled, unbaked pastry shell (store-bought or you can follow the link in the directions to a recipe for Basic Pastry Dough) Directions If you'd like to make your own pie crust, you can follow our Basic Pastry Dough recipe. Preheat oven to 425°F. In a large bowl, stir together pumpkin puree, brown sugar substitute, granulated sugar, egg substitute, cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg. Gradually add evaporated skim milk, whisking thoroughly. Pour pumpkin mixture into pie shell. Bake for 15 minutes. Reduce oven heat to 350°F and continue to bake for another 40 to 50 minutes, until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Let cool before serving. Nutrition Information Per serving: 145 calories (32% calories from fat), 6 g protein, 5 g total fat (0.5 g saturated fat), 20 g carbohydrate, 2 g dietary fiber, 1 mg cholesterol, 85 mg sodium Exchanges: 1 carbohydrate (1 bread/starch), 1 fat Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

The Big Book Of Diabetic Desserts

The Big Book Of Diabetic Desserts

When I think of diabetic desserts, not very many things come to mind. Most homemade treats are either not an option or can only be eaten on a restricted basis. Most storebought desserts are poor substitutes for the “real” thing. But when I first came across The Big Book of Diabetic Desserts, I was impressed and as I read through it, I liked the book even more because – diabetic or not – it is a well put-together cookbook with lots of appealing recipes. The book is divided into chapters and includes sections on cakes, quick breads, tarts, cookies, custards and pies. There is a tremendous amount of variety in the flavors used – from familiar chocolate cake to a more tropical mango lime tart – and it’s nice to see a cookbook that spends so much time on non-cookie recipes. I also want to note that the cookbook is not just packed with recipes that replace sugar with an artificial sweetener. Some do call for a sugar substitute, but the 150 or so recipes in the book seem to have had their nutritional data carefully looked at and deemed to be in a healthy/acceptable range. What this basically means is that many of the recipes in the book use real sugar, just in limited amounts. Sugar is such a crucial ingredient in baking and can affect the texture and moisture levels of baked goods to such an extent that most recipes made with a substitute can’t quite compare to one that actually uses sugar. The book was put out by the American Diabetes Association (but written by Jackie Mills) and includes all of the relevant nutritional information with every recipe, including nutritional exchanges, to make incorporating the snacks into a diabetic diet as easy as possible. Many of the recipes are low in fat, so the nutritional info also comes in handy for other people who are Continue reading >>

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