diabetestalk.net

Stomach Pain Metformin

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Gastroparesis: A Complication Of Diabetes

Gastroparesis: A Complication Of Diabetes

"Gastro" means stomach and "paresis" means impairment or paralysis. Diabetic gastropathy is a term for the spectrum of neuromuscular abnormalities of the stomach caused by diabetes. The abnormalities include gastric-dysrhythmias, antral hypomotility, incoordination of antroduodenal contractions and gastroparesis. Quick Stomach Anatomy Lesson The stomach is a neuromusclar organ that receives the food we ingest, mixes the food with acid and pepsin, and empties the nutriment suspension into the small intestine for absorption. The proximal stomach or fundus relaxes in order to receive the swallowed food (that's called receptive relaxation). The body and antrum mix and empty the food via recurrent gastric peristalic waves. The peristaltic contractions are paced by neoelectrical events called pacesetter potentials or slow waves. When gastric motility is normal, the postprandial (after eating) period is associated with pleasant epigastric sensations. Gastric motility disorders or gastroparesis presents with unpleasant, but non-specific postprandial symptoms: upper abdominal bloating, distention, discomfort, early satiety, nausea, and vomiting. If the vomitus contains undigested food, then gastroparesis is very likely to be present. Fluctuating, difficult-to-predict glucose levels may also reflect the presence of gastroparesis. Diabetes and the GI Tract The motility of your GI tract, which we were just speaking of, is controlled by an outer sleeve of muscles that surrounds your GI tract. They are controlled by a complex nervous system. Diabetes can damage these nerves, and it is this neurological long-term complication of diabetes that can lead to gastrointestinal disorders. How do we know this is the case? First, many of the people with gastroparesis have long-standing diabete Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

Metformin is the top of the line medication option for Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. If you must start taking medication for your newly diagnosed condition, it is then likely that your healthcare provider will prescribe this medication. Taking care of beta cells is an important thing. If you help to shield them from demise, they will keep your blood sugar down. This medication is important for your beta cell safety if you have Type 2 Diabetes. Not only does Metformin lower blood sugar and decrease resistance of insulin at the cellular level, it improves cell functioning, lipids, and how fat is distributed in our bodies. Increasing evidence in research points to Metformin’s effects on decreasing the replication of cancer cells, and providing a protective action for the neurological system. Let’s find out why Lori didn’t want to take Metformin. After learning about the benefits of going on Metformin, she changed her mind. Lori’s Story Lori came in worrying. Her doctor had placed her on Metformin, but she didn’t want to get the prescription filled. “I don’t want to go on diabetes medicine,” said Lori. “If I go on pills, next it will be shots. I don’t want to end up like my dad who took four shots a day.” “The doctor wants you on Metformin now to protect cells in your pancreas, so they can make more insulin. With diet and exercise, at your age, you can reverse the diagnosis. Would you like to talk about how we can work together to accomplish that?” “Reverse?” she asked. “What do you mean reverse? Will I not have Type 2 Diabetes anymore?” “You will always have it, but if you want to put it in remission, you are certainly young enough to do so. Your doctor wants to protect your beta cells in the pancreas. If you take the new medication, Continue reading >>

Diaformin

Diaformin

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about Diaformin. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, diabetes educator or pharmacist. All medicines have benefits and risks. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking Diaformin against the benefits expected for you. If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. What Diaformin is used for Diaformin is used to control blood glucose (the amount of sugar in the blood) in people with diabetes mellitus. Diaformin can be used in type 2 diabetes in adults and children over 10 years of age. It is especially useful in those who are overweight, when diet and exercise are not enough to lower high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). For adult patients, metformin can be used alone, or in combination with other oral diabetic medicines or in combination with insulin in insulin requiring type 2 diabetes. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Diaformin has been prescribed for you. How Diaformin works Diaformin belongs to a group of medicines called biguanides. Diaformin lowers high blood glucose (hyperglycaemia) by helping your body make better use of the insulin produced by your pancreas. People with type 2 diabetes are unable to make enough insulin or their body does not respond properly to the insulin it does make. This causes a build up of glucose in the blood, which can lead to serious medical problems. Long-term hyperglycaemia can lead to heart disease, blindness, kidney damage, poor blood circulation and gangrene. Before you take Diaformin When you must not take it Some of Continue reading >>

Metformin Ranbaxy 1000mg Tablet

Metformin Ranbaxy 1000mg Tablet

Brand Information Consumer medicine information (CMI) leaflet Please read this leaflet carefully before you start using Metformin Ranbaxy 1000mg Tablet. Download CMI (PDF) Download large text CMI (PDF) What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about METFORMIN RANBAXY 1000. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of your taking METFORMIN RANBAXY 1000 against the benefits it is expected to have for you. If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, please talk to your doctor or pharmacist or diabetes educator. Keep this leaflet with the medicine. You may need to read it again. What METFORMIN RANBAXY 1000 is used for METFORMIN RANBAXY 1000 is one of the group of medicines called oral hypoglycaemics, which work by reducing the level of sugar in the blood in people with diabetes mellitus, and by helping your body to make better use of the insulin produced by your pancreas. Diabetes Mellitus is a condition in which the blood glucose levels are not adequately controlled. If your blood glucose is not properly controlled, you may experience hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) or hyperglycaemia (high blood glucose). Hypoglycaemia Hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) can occur suddenly. Initial signs include: Weakness, trembling or shaking Sweating Light-headedness, dizziness, headache or lack of concentration Irritability, tearfulness or crying Hunger Numbness around the lips and tongue If not treated promptly, these may progress to: Loss of co-ordination Slurred speech Confusion Fits or loss of consciousness Hyperglycaemia Hyperglycaemia (high blood glucose) usually occurs more slowly Continue reading >>

Why Am I So Bloated?

Why Am I So Bloated?

Although this question is not only related to people who have diabetes, I found it interesting. It is often asked and is well worth exploring. Feel free to write to us if you have a question or concern. We are looking forward to giving you an accurate answer. Why am I so bloated? Can it be related to my diabetes? Over 10 million people in the U.S. complain about bloating and stomach issues, which may be corrected by a few simple changes. Bloating is “air in the intestines”, which has several causes – including over-indulging in fatty and salty foods. Let’s explore some other possible reasons. One of the most common oral medications prescribed for diabetes type 2 is Metformin, which targets the liver to produce less glucose. Metformin is cheap (free in Publix supermarkets which are located in Florida and the south), but can have the common side effects of bloating, stomach gas pains and diarrhea. Most physicians are fully aware of these problems and try to start on a low dose of medication which is gradually increased. This allows the body to acclimate without GI symptoms. If Metformin causes severe stomach issues, talk to your physician about Glumetza. Glumetza is a slow release variation given only once a day. Although it is more expensive, it may have fewer side effects. If you take Metformin, do not take it on an empty stomach. Either take a few bites of your meal prior to taking the pill or take it directly after eating your entire breakfast or dinner. The timing of the medication will reduce GI side effects. Research states that “berberine may have similar properties of Metformin without the GI side effects.” A small study published by the N.I.H. showed it did have a positive effect on lowering blood sugars and lipid levels. Berberine is a Chinese herb Continue reading >>

Metformin And Repaglinide

Metformin And Repaglinide

Pronunciation: met FOR min and re PAG li nide Brand: PrandiMet What is the most important information I should know about metformin and repaglinide? You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to metformin or repaglinide, if you have severe kidney disease or type 1 diabetes, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). You should not use metformin and repaglinide together with gemfibrozil or NPH insulin (such as isophane insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin and repaglinide. This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. What is metformin and repaglinide? Metformin and repaglinide are oral diabetes medications that help control blood sugar levels. Repaglinide works by causing the pancreas to produce insulin. Metformin works by decreasing glucose (sugar) production in the liver and decreasing absorption of glucose by the intestines. Metformin and repaglinide is a combination medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. This medicine is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin and repaglinide may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my doctor before taking metformin and repaglinide? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to metformin (Actoplus Met, Avandamet, Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza, Glucovance, Invokamet, Janumet, Jentadueto, Kazano, Kom Continue reading >>

Abdominal Pain, Vomiting, And Confusion

Abdominal Pain, Vomiting, And Confusion

In the latest Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 54-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus was admitted to the hospital because of abdominal pain, vomiting, and confusion. Initial laboratory evaluation revealed a serum lactate level of 20.3 mmol per liter and a venous blood pH of 6.62. A diagnosis was made. Metformin is excreted unmetabolized in the urine. Therefore, impaired kidney function may result in the accumulation of metformin in the plasma, causing lactic acidosis. In patients who have toxic effects of metformin, the mechanism of lactic acidosis is multifactorial, including enhanced conversion of glucose to lactate in the small intestine and inhibition of gluconeogenesis by lactate, pyruvate, and alanine. Clinical Pearls Conditions that may cause a very large anion gap acidosis include lactic acidosis, aspirin overdose, methanol or ethylene glycol toxicity, diabetic ketoacidosis, and uremia. Altered mental status, including lethargy, stupor, and even coma, can be a direct consequence of acidosis. Acidemia may lead to increased vasodilatation and warm skin, and may also be associated with a paradoxical hypothermia, which is a known complication of profound acidosis. Cardiovascular consequences of acidosis include cardiac failure and catecholamine release, which may lead to arrhythmia and some degree of respiratory compromise. Acidemia can also cause gastric atony, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Morning Report Questions Q: What is a nonhypoxic (type B) lactic acidosis? A: Type B lactic acidosis refers to the impaired lactate metabolism that can occur in association with the administration of certain medications (e.g., metformin, salicylate, isoniazid, and zidovudine) or in association with certain cancers (e.g., lymphoma and leukemi Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Xigduo Xr

What You Should Know About Xigduo Xr

For adults with type 2 diabetes, in addition to diet and exercise See the big picture When combined with diet and exercise, once-daily XIGDUO (zig-DOO-oh) XR provides a number of important benefits for adults with type 2 diabetes. In a clinical trial, XIGDUO XR lowered A1C approximately 50% more than metformin alone.† Although XIGDUO XR is not a weight loss or blood pressure drug, XIGDUO XR additionally may help people lose weight—on average 3%‡—and lower their systolic blood pressure.§ Individual results may vary. XIGDUO XR is a convenient, once-daily dose, taken in the morning with food. XIGDUO XR combines two proven therapies, metformin and dapagliflozin, to help significantly lower blood sugar. Metformin reduces the amount of sugar absorbed by the digestive system and made by the liver, and helps your body respond to its own insulin. Dapagliflozin removes some sugar through the urine Do not take XIGDUO XR if you have moderate to severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with XIGDUO XR. Understand the possible side effects Serious side effects can happen in people who take XIGDUO XR, including: Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt) which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure, take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics), are 65 years of age or older, are on a low-salt diet, or have kidney problems. Talk to your doctor about what you can do to prevent dehydration Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with d Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Metformin | Alcohol With Metformin Side Effects

Alcohol And Metformin | Alcohol With Metformin Side Effects

What are the possible interactions of alcohol and metformin? What should you know about alcohol with metformin side effects? These are common questions people about metformin, which is a diabetic drug. Below what should be known about alcohol and metformin will be covered, including the possible alcohol with metformin side effects. Metformin is a drug that’s used to treat type 2 diabetes, and it can be used alone or with other medicines, and in adults and children. For people who are at risk of developing diabetes it can also be used as a way to prevent that, and it can be used as a treatment option for polycystic ovaries and weight gain due to the use of certain medicines. Metformin helps control high blood sugar levels, and this can in turn help prevent serious complications like kidney damage, nerve problems, and blindness. When your diabetes is well-controlled, it can also help lower the risk of a stroke or heart attack. The way metformin works is by restoring the way your body responds to the insulin you produce, and it decreases the amount of sugar made by your liver, and thereby absorbed by your stomach and intestines. Side effects of metformin can include nausea, vomiting, general upset stomach, diarrhea, weakness or a metallic taste in your mouth. In some cases, if metformin is taken with other diabetic medications, it can cause low blood sugar, but this isn’t usually a symptom of this medicine on its own. Understanding drug interactions is important with any medicine you’re prescribed, which is why you should tell your doctor about all other medicines you’re taking, your medical history, and even supplements and vitamins you take. Some of the medicines that can interact with metformin include beta-blockers and any medicine that affects your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

I'm seeing quite a few posts on BBSes from people who are having problems with metformin because of side effects that could be eliminated if they were taking the extended release form of this drug. For some reason, many family doctors don't seem to be aware that there is a ER version of this drug that has such benefits. This is probably because metformin is a cheap generic and isn't promoted by herds of beautiful ex-cheerleaders turned drug company salespushers who "educate" doctors about far more expensive--and less effective--newer drugs. Here are the facts: Metformin (also sold under the brand name Glucophage) comes in a regular version which is taken at meal time, three times a day, and an extended release form (marketed as ER or XR) which is taken once a day. Almost always, when people report diarrhea or intense heartburn with metformin, they are taking regular version. I experienced the heartburn on the regular drug. It was very disturbing because the pain was localized over my heart and felt just like the description of a heart attack you read in articles. My doctor assured me it was coming from the metformin, but that didn't make it any easier to live with because I kept wondering how, if I were having a real heart attack, I'd know it wasn't a pain from the drug? The ER version releases the drug more slowly and this usually eliminates the gastrointestinal problems. The trade off with taking the ER form is that the amount of blood sugar lowering you see might be a bit less than with the regular form as the drug acts in a slower smoother fashion rather than hitting all at once. But if you can't take the regular at all drug because of the side effects, the slight weakening in effect is a reasonable trade off. Plus, you only have to remember to take one dose rather Continue reading >>

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Managing diabetes often brings changes in what we eat and the medications we take. You may also notice some changes in how your gut, or gastrointestinal (GI) tract, feels, sounds, and responds. Changes in eating You are likely making changes in eating habits, including more foods rich in fiber, such as fruits, vegetables, and beans. Fiber can be filling without adding unwanted calories, and it can help improve abnormal cholesterol levels. But there may be a few uh-ohs if you rapidly increase the amount you eat. "Gas and bloating are a side effect of fiber," says Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., R.D., professor of health promotion and nutrition research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York. "Increasing your intake gradually may help." She suggests adding legumes, such as beans and lentils, to increase dietary fiber. "Throwing out the water you soak them in and giving them an extra rinse before cooking may also help decrease the gas and bloating," she says. Glucose-lowering meds Several prescription medications used to lower blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes can stir up your gut. Experts tend to suggest that you start with a low dose and slowly increase it based on your provider's instructions. Metformin Metformin, the typical starting medication in type 2 diabetes to bring blood glucose levels in range, can lead to heartburn, nausea, or diarrhea. Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the diabetes division at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, says, "I try to use metformin in all of my patients who have type 2 diabetes. When there is a problem, it is diarrhea and abdominal discomfort. There are 5-10 percent of people who just can't tolerate it." Typically, metformin is started at a low dose and increased Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin?

What Is Metformin?

We take a closer look at this popular diabetes drug. A drug prescription can come with a lot of questions. With our “Know Your Drugs” series, we provide you with a snapshot of the different diabetes drugs on the market, and links to additional information. Metformin is currently the most popular drug prescribed for those with Type 2 diabetes. It is considered a generally safe and effective drug for lowering blood sugar levels, and it’s one of the first diabetes medications prescribed after diagnosis. According to a report in Diabetes Forecast, it was a three-foot tall flowering plant named galega officinalis, or “goat’s rue”, that paved the way for metformin’s discovery in the early 20th century. There is a compound found within the plant that lowers blood sugar. By itself, the compound, called guanidine, can be toxic, but when two guanidine compounds are combined, they became a useful tool for blood sugar control. sponsor Through the vagaries of fate and of the drug development process, metformin languished after its discovery, and wasn’t clinically refined until the late 1950’s in France. It also didn’t gain FDA approval until 1994. Metformin is able to help control blood sugar levels by signaling that the liver should produce less glucose; it also makes cells more receptive to insulin absorption. Strange as it may sound, researchers are still trying to determine how exactly the drug does this. For example, whereas before it was believed that metformin worked in the circulatory system, researchers recently discovered it most likely works in the stomach. As researchers explore more about how metformin works, they are discovering some beneficial side effects to the drug. Studies have shown that metformin may cut the risk of diseases such as Alzheimer Continue reading >>

Metaglip Side Effects Center

Metaglip Side Effects Center

Metaglip (glipizide and metformin HCl) is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. Metaglip is not for treating type 1 diabetes. The brand name Metaglip is discontinued, but generic versions may be available. Common side effects of Metaglip (glipizide and metformin HCl) include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain or upset, joint or muscle aches pain, headache, dizziness, or cold symptoms (stuffy nose, sneezing, or sore throat). Dosage of Metaglip is individualized on the basis of both effectiveness and tolerance while not exceeding the maximum recommended daily dose of 20 mg glipizide/2000 mg metformin. Metaglip may interact with furosemide, nifedipine, cimetidine, ranitidine, amiloride, triamterene, digoxin, morphine, procainamide, quinidine, trimethoprim, vancomycin, or ketoconazole, or itraconazole. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may result if you take Metaglip with isoniazid, diuretics, steroids, heart or blood pressure medications, niacin, phenothiazines, thyroid medicines, birth control pills and other hormones, seizure medicines, and diet pills or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) may result if you take Metaglip with exenatide, probenecid, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), beta-blockers, or other diabetes medications. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. During pregnancy, Metaglip should be used only when prescribed. Insulin treatment may be preferred during pregnancy. If you are using this drug during your pregnancy, your doctor may switch you to insulin at least 1 month before the expected delivery date because of Metaglip Continue reading >>

More in diabetes