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Stevia Vs Splenda For Diabetics

Which Is A Better Choice For Diabetics, Stevia, Equal, Or Splenda? - Quora

Which Is A Better Choice For Diabetics, Stevia, Equal, Or Splenda? - Quora

Which is a better choice for diabetics, stevia, equal, or splenda? Answered Feb 5, 2018 Author has 161 answers and 23.4k answer views As with most questions, the answer depends, but in general Stevia is far better and less harmful than the others. Where the it depends comes in is when Stevia is cut with some other sweetener or when they dont use all the beneficial parts of the stevia plant. Some of the stevia you find on the shelves in supermarkets today fall into this. The best sweetener that I could find to replace sugar is of course natural. Stevia is what I use even today, even after Ive cured my type 2. Splenda comes in second if you keep score. I am not aware of any studies on Splenda that produced a significantly negative result. When I did my research on equal, I found results that presented some major problems for me. I used to use equal for my coffee, and I began noticing a brain fog sometimes, which I didnt attribute to equal. But a friend of mine mentioned that it was bad for me, so I began to research it and found that was one of the known side effects. Continue reading >>

What We're Reading: Splenda Vs. Stevia - Diabetes Self-management

What We're Reading: Splenda Vs. Stevia - Diabetes Self-management

This week, wed like to direct your attention to this post at www.mydiabetescentral.com entitled Splenda or Stevia? This blog entry is written by David Mendosa, a medical writer with Type 2 diabetes, and details his reasons for switching back and forth between the two noncaloric sweeteners. For more information about various sweeteners on the market, check out dietitian Amy Campbells blog entries on Satisfying Your Sweet Tooth With Low-Calorie Sweeteners: Part 1 and Part 2. This week, wed like to direct your attention to this post at www.mydiabetescentral.com entitled Splenda or Stevia? This blog entry is written by David Mendosa, a medical writer with Type 2 diabetes, and details his reasons for switching back and forth between the two noncaloric sweeteners. For more information about various sweeteners on the market, check out dietitian Amy Campbells blog entries on Satisfying Your Sweet Tooth With Low-Calorie Sweeteners: Part 1 and Part 2. Disclaimer of Medical Advice: You understand that the blog posts and comments to such blog posts (whether posted by us, our agents or bloggers, or by users) do not constitute medical advice or recommendation of any kind, and you should not rely on any information contained in such posts or comments to replace consultations with your qualified health care professionals to meet your individual needs. The opinions and other information contained in the blog posts and comments do not reflect the opinions or positions of the Site Proprietor. Splenda vs Stevia?? Heres my take on it: Splenda = 95% Maltodextrin and Dextrose. Sucralose, their high intensity chemical sweetneer, accounts for about 5% of the product. Sucralose is made by patented process that substitutes three of the hydrogen-oxygen groups in sugar with three chlorine atoms. T Continue reading >>

Splenda Or Stevia ?

Splenda Or Stevia ?

Is it better to sweeten with Splenda, the McNeil Nutritionals brand of sucralose, or with one of the many brands of stevia? I keep changing my mind on this question and going back and forth between them. I suspect that I’m not the only one puzzling over this issue. I’ve just switched back to stevia. It wasn’t because of any new information or sudden insight. It was partly because I have begun to accept that people and organizations I respect prefer stevia. The natural foods stores, Whole Foods and Wild Oats, where I almost buy everything else that I eat, don’t sell Splenda. Andrew Weil, M.D., the leading exponent of the integrative medicine, which I believe in myself, prefers stevia to any of the artificial sweeteners. "The only non-caloric sweetener I recommend is stevia, an herb in the chrysanthemum family native to Paraguay," he writes. "Stevia is safe for diabetics and is widely used as a sweetener around the world, especially in Japan and Brazil." Stevia is indeed natural. But natural isn’t necessarily safe. Think of all the poisonous mushrooms, to say nothing of strychnine and curare. It’s hard to determine the advantages and disadvantages of the natural stevia, which is essentially untested, against the artificial Splenda that has been tested. Johnson & Johnson’s subsidiary, McNeil Nutritionals, advertises that Splenda is "Made from sugar so it tastes like sugar." In fact lawsuits are pending that alleges the company is sugar-coating Splenda to consumers. The Sugar Association, Merisant Worldwide, which makes rival artificial sweeteners Equal and NutraSweet, and a group of individuals have filed three class-action suits again McNeil Nutritionals. They claim that company misleads consumers into believing Splenda is a natural product. Splenda also doe Continue reading >>

Splenda® Brand Sweetener Is Suitable For People With Diabetes

Splenda® Brand Sweetener Is Suitable For People With Diabetes

SPLENDA® Brand Sweetener, or sucralose, is not sugar and the body does not recognize it as such. Unlike sugar, sucralose is not broken down for energy. It is not a source of carbohydrate or glucose, and clinical studies show that it has no effect on blood glucose levels, insulin secretion or blood levels, glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c), or blood glucose control. People with diabetes can eat a variety of food products, according to the dietary program prescribed by their doctor or registered dietitian. These can include foods sweetened with sugar. However, meal plans for people with diabetes usually control total carbohydrate intake and, often, calorie intake. In a meal plan for people with diabetes, up to 4 packets of SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener or up to 8 teaspoons of SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener Granulated is considered a "free food." The American Dietetic Association and the American Diabetes Association consider a free food to be any food or beverage that contains less than 20 calories and 5 grams or less of carbohydrate per serving. When used in place of sugar, SPLENDA® Sweetener Products can also help people with diabetes reduce their intake of carbohydrates and calories. It's important to note that SPLENDA® Sugar Blend does contain sugar, so people with diabetes need to consider this when counting their carbohydrate intake. Calories and carbohydrates can be present as well in other ingredients in foods and beverages sweetened with any SPLENDA® Sweetener product. People with diabetes need to count these calories and carbohydrates when planning their meals. To help people manage intake, complete nutrition information for dozens of recipes made with SPLENDA® Sweetener Products are available at: www.splenda.com. Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners: Any Effect On Blood Sugar?

Artificial Sweeteners: Any Effect On Blood Sugar?

Can I use artificial sweeteners if I have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. You can use most sugar substitutes if you have diabetes, including: Saccharin (Sweet'N Low) Aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal) Acesulfame potassium (Sunett) Sucralose (Splenda) Stevia (Pure Via, Truvia) Artificial sweeteners, also called sugar substitutes, offer the sweetness of sugar without the calories. Artificial sweeteners are many times sweeter than sugar, so it takes a smaller amount to sweeten foods. This is why foods made with artificial sweeteners may have fewer calories than those made with sugar. Sugar substitutes don't affect your blood sugar level. In fact, most artificial sweeteners are considered "free foods" — foods containing less than 20 calories and 5 grams or less of carbohydrates — because they don't count as calories or carbohydrates on a diabetes exchange. Remember, however, other ingredients in foods containing artificial sweeteners can still affect your blood sugar level. More research is needed, but studies are increasingly finding that the benefits of substituting sugar-sweetened food and beverages with those that have been sweetened artificially may not be as clear as once thought, particularly when consumed in large amounts. One reason may be a "rebound" effect, where some people end up consuming more of an unhealthy type of food because of the misperception that because it's sugar-free it's healthy. Also, be cautious with sugar alcohols — including mannitol, sorbitol and xylitol. Sugar alcohols can increase your blood sugar level. And for some people, sugar alcohols may cause diarrhea. Continue reading >>

Splenda Vs Stevia

Splenda Vs Stevia

Could someone please tell me which is safe to use Splenda or Stevia. Everything I have read says that splenda is not safe and causes cancer and lots of other problems and Stevia is a safe product. I'm confused please help! I haven't heard of any specific dangers of Splenda (sucralose) but it does have some carbs so make sure you count them when baking. Stevia comes from a plant. Stevia has a different taste to me and I'm still experimenting with it to get the right amount in baking. There are lots of sugar subs out there, some good, some bad. Thanks . I was surfing the Internet and splenda did not have great reviews. I'm sure you could get some stevia recipes online! Stevia has an aftertaste to me. I rarely use splenda or sweetners. I have learned to eat most things without them. I do drink diet soda which has asparteme, which I am sure is not good. But as a diabetic you can only give up so many things. Both of these artificial sweeteners are almost certainly safe to use. Of course, you can find reports suggesting that both may cause cancer or that Stevia may cause "reproductive issues," and you can certainly find individual to claim that one of these caused them great damage. The best available fact-based evidence is that these products are safe to use. Personally, I use Splenda from time-to-time, but I try to avoid eating a lot of sweet-tasting stuff, regardless of how it is sweetened. I use Splenda on a regular basis and prefer it to other sweeteners. If you do some detailed research you will discover that much of the negative press on Splenda (and marketing related lawsuits) is sourced from the sugar industry. That university study that was able to induce cancer in laboratory mice with Splenda was sponsored by the sugar industry. If I remember the number correctly, Continue reading >>

How Natural & Artificial Sweeteners Affect Blood Sugar

How Natural & Artificial Sweeteners Affect Blood Sugar

I have wanted to write a post about sweeteners for a while now. Mainly because I get a little frustrated when reading or hearing outright incorrect claims about how some of the natural and artificial sweeteners affect your blood sugar. As a person with diabetes, I want to know exactly what will happen to my blood sugar when I eat or drink something, and I don’t take kindly to half-true marketing claims. I’ve decided to focus on how natural & artificial sweeteners impact blood sugar rather than on whether they are healthy or not, since I think that is somewhat out of my domain and because plenty of others have already covered that. What are natural & artificial sweeteners? FDA defines sweeteners as: “…commonly used as sugar substitutes or sugar alternatives because they are many times sweeter than sugar but contribute only a few or no calories when added to foods”. This means that regular sugar, honey, and Agave nectar/syrup don’t fall into the sweetener category. However, I do want to address these shortly before moving on to the real artificial sweeteners, since I’ve seen claims of how honey and agave won’t impact blood sugar in the same way as sugar. Honey and agave nectar Let’s start with honey because, let’s face it, it’s sugar in liquid form. It’s delicious, but an October 2015 study in the Journal of Nutrition found that when subjects were given honey, cane sugar, or high-fructose corn syrup, they saw no notable difference in blood sugar increase. As for agave, I think that the corporate marketing machine has been very clever when declaring this a health food, for as Dr. Jonny Bowden points out“..It’s basically high-fructose corn syrup masquerading as healthy food.” Agave nectar may have a lower glycemic index than sugar or honey, but Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners And Diabetes

Artificial Sweeteners And Diabetes

Is it possible to eat sweets when you have diabetes? The answer is "yes." But when you’re trying to satisfy your sweet tooth, it can be hard to know what to reach for at the grocery store (sugar-free this or low-calorie that). So, use this primer to help you choose wisely. The Sweet Facts When you’re comparing sweeteners, keep these things in mind: Sugars are naturally occurring carbohydrates. These include brown sugar, cane sugar, confectioners’ sugar, fructose, honey, and molasses. They have calories and raise your blood glucose levels (the level of sugar in your blood). Reduced-calorie sweeteners are sugar alcohols. You might know these by names like isomalt, maltitol, mannitol, sorbitol, and xylitol. You'll often find them in sugar-free candy and gum. They have about half the calories of sugars and can raise your blood sugar levels, although not as much as other carbohydrates. Artificial sweeteners are considered "free foods." They were designed in a lab, have no calories, and do not raise your blood sugar levels. Types of Artificial Sweeteners Artificial low-calorie sweeteners include: Saccharin (Sweet'N Low, Sugar Twin). You can use it in both hot and cold foods. Avoid this sweetener if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal). You can use it in both cold and warm foods. It may lose some sweetness at high temperatures. People who have a condition called phenylketonuria should avoid this sweetener. Acesulfame potassium or ace-K (Sweet One, Swiss Sweet, Sunett). You can use it in both cold and hot foods, including in baking and cooking. Sucralose (Splenda). You can use it in hot and cold foods, including in baking and cooking. Processed foods often contain it. Advantame can be used in baked goods, soft drinks and other non-alcoholic bev Continue reading >>

Stevia Vs Splenda | Diabetic Connect

Stevia Vs Splenda | Diabetic Connect

I have just dropped the use of Splenda due to the "controversy" of it's safety. My brother who is also a diabetic has made the change as well. My first time using Stevia was this morning in my coffee and my BS skyrocketed to 312! No other changes, just the Stevia. Is anyone using this product and having hyperglycemia? I read alot about substitute sugar also fat feee sf also everyone have what works for them i use real stuff limit my use! Or eat natural ! Does when u use subititute sugar anything else does have same effect maybe used 2 much! Beware of products that combine Stevia with sugar. I accidentally bought that once. I use Stevia exclusively, no artificial sweeteners, and I have never had a spike from it. One thing to remember is that each of us react differently to different foods/sweeteners, what is fine for one diabetic may not be for the next person. I tried stevia but didn't like it's taste in coffee, but it was fine in tea. The important thing is to test and see how you react to a given food. It may take a few tries to find out. For now, I still use (evil, lol) sugar in my coffee and count it in my carbs for that given meal. Hope you can work out what is best for you. I have never had that happen to me on stevia or stevia based sweeteners. But we all can have issues with any number of the chemicals used to create sweeteners. Did you use pure stivia or did you use a derivative? I grow my own and dry it and turn it into powder. It's is good for steeping and some cooking, but not for baking. Even just adding a single fresh leaf to a hot tea and letting it steep is plenty. Some people get an after taste that is very off putting with true stevia. I didn't know how bad Splenda or Equal made me feel until I stopped taking it. It was like my insides were free after Continue reading >>

Splenda Vs. Stevia

Splenda Vs. Stevia

Form Splenda comes in granular form and as tablets. Splenda is sweet and is marketed as tasting like sugar, though some users report being able to tell the difference. Stevia comes as fresh leaves, dried leaves, white powder and a liquid concentrate. In its powder or concentrated liquid form, the sweetness has a slower onset and longer duration than sugar. It is 300 times sweeter than sugar. The leaves may taste bitter or like licorice. Both Splenda and stevia are used as commercial drinks sweeteners, artificial sweeteners and in baking. Splenda directly replaces table sugar in baking. Bakers using stevia need to refer to a conversion table because of its sweetness. Health Concerns Splenda is composed primarily of dextrose and maltdextrin, both of which are digestible. Sucralose is indigestible, which means it is not absorbed into the body. As such, sucralose is safe as a diabetic sugar substitute. The FDA lists 0.6 grams of sucralose as being safe for adult consumption. That translates into 31 grams of Splenda. A serving size is one gram. Sucralose is safe for diabetics, but diabetics need to be wary of products containing Splenda as they may have other harmful additives. Stevia has been found to have some medicinal qualities, such as possible anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hypertensive, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, anti-diarrheal, diuretic and immunomodulatory effects. However, stevia is not used in traditional medicine. Stevia can have side effects such as nausea, bloating, dizziness, muscle pain and numbness. The FDA lists four milligrams per kilo of body weight as safe for adult consumption, or 330 milligrams for an adult. Stevia is safe for diabetics. The video below compares Splenda with Truvia, one of the most popular stevia brands: Safety The FDA has conducted nume Continue reading >>

Are Artificial Sweeteners Safe For People With Diabetes?

Are Artificial Sweeteners Safe For People With Diabetes?

As diabetes educators, we are frequently asked if sugar substitutes are safe and which ones are best. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Over time, there have been many sugar substitutes, and we always tell people that the one you use is a personal choice. They are safe for people with diabetes, and they can be used to reduce both your calorie and carbohydrate intake. Sugar substitutes also can help curb those cravings you have for something sweet. Youll find artificial sweeteners in diet drinks , baked goods, frozen desserts, candy, light yogurt and chewing gum. You can also find them as stand-alone sweeteners to add to coffee, tea , cereal and fruit. Some are also available for cooking and baking. Its important to remember that only a small amount is needed since the sweetening power of these substitutes is (at least) 100 times stronger than regular sugar. There are currently six artificial sweeteners that have been tested and approved by the FDAor placed on the agencys Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) list. Numerous scientific studies have been performed on each of them to confirm they are safe for consumption. The FDA has established an acceptable daily intake (ADI) for each of the products. This represents the amount of a food ingredient that can be used safely on a daily basis over a lifetime without risk.Here is a current list of sweeteners that have been approved by the FDA. 1. Acesulfame-potassium, also known as Ace-K This is generally blended with another low-calorie sweetener. Brand names include Sunett and Sweet One It is stable under heat, even under moderately acidic or basic conditions, allowing it to be used as Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners Or Natural Sugar: Which Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Artificial Sweeteners Or Natural Sugar: Which Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Here's what you need to know to understand the impact of sweeteners—both nutritive and non-nutritive—on your blood sugar. Walk down the supermarket aisles and you’ll find a dizzying array of sweeteners. Everything from ordinary (white) table sugar to newly-formulated sugars, sugar substitutes and more. Some claim benefits for people with diabetes that promise to have no effect on blood sugar. But with so many choices—from ordinary table sugar (aka cane, sucrose), maple sugar and agave to newer arrivals like coconut sugar, monk sugar and stevia, to nonnutritive sweeteners (sucralose, aspartame, etc.)—how do you know which one is best for you and your blood sugar? It's important to know that use of the word natural is not a term regulated by the FDA, nor does it have a clear definition. These so-called “natural” sweeteners, also referred to as nutritive sweeteners, are a type of sugar (typically sucrose), which provide calories from carbohydrates. All nutritive sugars have about 14 calories per teaspoon and contain 5 grams of carbohydrates. Food companies seem to use the word “natural” as a marketing gimmick to give consumers a sense of additional health benefits. Popular nutritive sweetners include: brown sugar, honey, coconut sugar and agave syrup. But remember, sugar is sugar. Whether honey or table sugar, they all contain carbohydrates and will raise blood glucose levels. Having Sugar Knowledge is Important Contrary to popular belief, people with diabetes can consume sugar but it’s best when consumed in foods where it occurs naturally as it does in whole fruits. Understanding the type of sugar you consume and how much, is essential for successful diabetes management. People with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, don’t have the adequate insulin nee Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Splenda, Sweet And Low, Equal, And Stevia

The Difference Between Splenda, Sweet And Low, Equal, And Stevia

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has deemed as many as eight kinds of artificial sweeteners to be safe for consumption. You probably recognize some of them by their brand name: sucralose (Splenda), saccharin (Sweet and Low), aspartame (Equal), and stevia (Truvia). Each has varying levels of sweetness and uses. These sugar substitutes are popular among people suffering from diabetes because they don’t spike blood sugar the same way sugar does, and among dieters who want something “sweet” without the hefty calories. Because unlike table sugar, which has approximately 16 calories per teaspoon, Splenda, Sweet and Low, Equal, and Truvia all contribute little to no calories. Here’s where they differ: Splenda (sucralose): Sucralose isn’t broken down in the body, so it has zero calories. It’s about 600 times sweeter than table sugar and can be used in anything. Since it doesn’t lose its sweetness when you apply heat to it, you can use Splenda in hot foods and baking. Sweet and Low (saccharin): Sweet and Low is one of the first available artificial sweeteners and used in foods, medicine, and even in toothpaste. Saccharin is 200 to 700 times sweeter than sugar, has no calories, and can be used in cooking, too. Equal (aspartame): Aspartame is typically found in chewing gum, diet soda, puddings, and many other “sugar-free” snacks. It’s 200 times sweeter than sugar, but it does have some calories (a measly 2 calories or so) per packet. It also loses its sweetness when heatedso it’s not ideal in baked goods. Truvia (stevia): Because the sweetness of stevia is derived from the leaves of a plant called Stevia rebaudiana, it’s often touted as a “natural sweetener.” In the U.S., the plant itself is not added to the food, just a chemical extract called Re Continue reading >>

Splenda Vs. Stevia | Livestrong.com

Splenda Vs. Stevia | Livestrong.com

Dried and fresh green stevia leaves.Photo Credit: bdspn/iStock/Getty Images Sugar substitutes can help you get the sweet taste you desire without adding quite so many calories to your diet. Splenda and stevia are two of the available options, each with its own benefits and considerations. Both stevia and Splenda, also called sucralose, are calorie-free sweeteners. You can use them in cooking or at the table. Splenda is 600 times sweeter than sugar, and manufacturers use it in some diet drinks and foods. Stevia itself isn't found in any processed foods, only Rebaudioside A, which is a purified extract of this plant that is a few hundred times sweeter than sugar. Neither of these sweeteners tastes exactly like sugar, according to the results of a taste test published in "Consumer Reports" in June 2010. Stevia can give foods a bit of a bitter flavor, and sucralose has an artificial flavor. Splenda is derived from sugar but isn't absorbed in the same way. Most of it leaves your body without being digested, which is why it doesn't have any calories. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved its use in foods in 1998. Stevia comes from the leaves of the Stevia rebaudiana plant. Although it has been used for hundreds of years in Paraguay, only the purified extract Rebaudioside A was approved by the FDA for use in food in 2008. Whole stevia leaves and other types of stevia extracts are only approved for use as dietary supplements. Eating foods sweetened with stevia may be just as filling as eating foods sweetened with sugar, according to a study published in "Appetite" in August 2010. A similar study published in the "British Journal of Nutrition" in May 2011, however, found that Splenda may not have the same benefit. Both Splenda and stevia can be helpful for diabetics be Continue reading >>

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 6 A Small Amount of Real Sugar Is Best, but Sugar Substitutes Can Help If you think that people with diabetes should always avoid sugar, think again — they can enjoy the sweet stuff, in moderation. "The best bet is to use a very minimal amount of real sugar as part of a balanced diabetic diet," says Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, of Nutritious Life, a nutrition practice based in New York City. That being said, sugar substitutes offer sweetness while controlling carbohydrate intake and blood glucose. There are many sugar substitutes to choose from, but they’re not all calorie-free and they vary in terms of their impact on blood sugar. "The major difference between the sugar substitutes is whether they are nutritive or non-nutritive sweeteners," says Melissa Mullins, MS, RD, a certified diabetes educator with Johnston Memorial Hospital in Abingdon, Va. "Non-nutritive sweeteners provide no calories and no changes in blood glucose levels, which is perfect for people with diabetes.” Here are six sweet options to consider. Continue reading >>

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