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Stevia Diabetes

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 6 A Small Amount of Real Sugar Is Best, but Sugar Substitutes Can Help If you think that people with diabetes should always avoid sugar, think again — they can enjoy the sweet stuff, in moderation. "The best bet is to use a very minimal amount of real sugar as part of a balanced diabetic diet," says Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, of Nutritious Life, a nutrition practice based in New York City. That being said, sugar substitutes offer sweetness while controlling carbohydrate intake and blood glucose. There are many sugar substitutes to choose from, but they’re not all calorie-free and they vary in terms of their impact on blood sugar. "The major difference between the sugar substitutes is whether they are nutritive or non-nutritive sweeteners," says Melissa Mullins, MS, RD, a certified diabetes educator with Johnston Memorial Hospital in Abingdon, Va. "Non-nutritive sweeteners provide no calories and no changes in blood glucose levels, which is perfect for people with diabetes.” Here are six sweet options to consider. Continue reading >>

Stevia: A Sweetener Shrouded In Mystery And Debate

Stevia: A Sweetener Shrouded In Mystery And Debate

Over the past several weeks, we’ve taken a closer look at various nutritive, or caloric, sweeteners, including high-fructose corn syrup. Thank you all for your comments, questions, and suggestions. The use of sweeteners is obviously an important, and often emotionally charged, topic. This week, I thought I’d write about stevia, a sweetener that has grown more popular with many people who are uncomfortable with using artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame and sucralose. Stevia is an herb that belongs to the sunflower family (Asteraceae). It’s grown primarily in Central and South America and is sometimes called sweet leaf or sugar leaf. For many centuries, people living in Paraguay and Brazil have used stevia to sweeten a drink called yerba mate. In the early 1930s, scientists isolated the ingredients, stevioside and rebaudioside, that give stevia its sweetness. These ingredients, collectively known as glycosides, are about 300 times sweeter than sucrose, although they are calorie-free and carbohydrate-free (meaning they don’t affect blood glucose levels). Stevia users describe stevia as tasting a bit like licorice. Japan has been manufacturing stevia since the 1970s and happens to be the largest consumer of stevia compared to other countries. Stevia is also used in other Asian countries as well as in Central and South America. Interestingly, stevia has yet to be approved for use as a sweetener by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), by Canada, or by the European Union. It is, however, available as a dietary supplement. Why? Studies done several years ago hinted that stevia may be harmful in several ways. First, large amounts of stevia given to both male and female rodents affected their fertility and led to fewer and smaller-sized offspring. Second, in Continue reading >>

Stevia Side Effects: What You Need To Know

Stevia Side Effects: What You Need To Know

Article last reviewed by Fri 27 October 2017. Visit our Nutrition / Diet category page for the latest news on this subject, or sign up to our newsletter to receive the latest updates on Nutrition / Diet. All references are available in the References tab. Gasmalla, M. A. H., Yang, R., & Hua, X. (2014, May 18). Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni: An alternative sugar replacer and its application in food industry. Review of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Studies. Retrieved from Grembecka, M. (2015). Natural sweeteners in a human diet [Abstract]. Roczniki Panstwowego Zakladu Higieny, 66(3), 195202. Retrieved from Has stevia been approved by FDA to be used as a sweetener? (2017, April 4). Retrieved from Gupta, E., Purwar, S., Sundaram, S., & Rai, G. K. (2013, December 10). Nutritional and therapeutic values of Stevia rebaudiana: A review. Journal of Medicinal Plants Research, 7(46), 33433353. Retrieved from Jentzsch, P. V., Torrico-Vallejos, S., Mendieta-Brito, S., Ramos, L., & Ciobota, V. (2016, March). Detection of counterfeit stevia products using a handheld Raman spectrometer [Abstract]. Vibrational Spectroscopy, 83, 126131. Retrieved from Lohner, S., Toews, I., & Meerpohl, J. I. (2017, September 8). Health outcomes of non-nutritive sweeteners: Analysis of the research landscape. Nutrition Journal, 16, 55. Retrieved from Non-nutritive sweeteners. (2017, September 8). Nutrition Journal, 16, 55. Retrieved from Pepino, M. Y. (2015, June 19). Metabolic effects of non-nutritive sweeteners. Physiology & Behavior, 152(00), 450455. Retrieved from Pope, E., Koren, G., & Bozzo, P. (2014, November). Sugar substitutes during pregnancy. Canadian Family Physician, 60(11), 10031005. Retrieved from Purkayastha, S., Markosyan, A., Prakash, I., Bhusari, S., Pugh Jr., G., Lynch, B., Roberts Continue reading >>

Anti Diabetic Property Of Aqueous Extract Of Stevia Rebaudiana Bertoni Leaves In Streptozotocin-induced Diabetes In Albino Rats

Anti Diabetic Property Of Aqueous Extract Of Stevia Rebaudiana Bertoni Leaves In Streptozotocin-induced Diabetes In Albino Rats

BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Anti diabetic property of aqueous extract of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni leaves in Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in albino rats BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine2018 Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) natural, non-caloric sugar substitute is rich source of pharmacologically important glycoside stevioside that is linked to the pathology and complications of diabetes. The current research was carried out to explore the anti-diabetic effect of aqueous extract of Stevia rebaudiana leaves in albino rats. For this purpose, diabetes was induced by administration of streptozotocin (40mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally). The diabetic rats were administered with aqueous stevia extract at different dose levels (200, 300, 400 and 500ppm/kg b.w) for 8weeks; the control rats were fed basal diet during this period. Stevia aqueous extract improved caloric management and weight control by decreasing the feed intake and body weight gain. Furthermore, intake of stevia extract resulted in significant (P < 0.05) decrease in the random blood glucose level ( 73.24%) and fasting blood glucose ( 66.09%) and glycosylated (HbA1c) hemoglobin (5.32%) while insulin (17.82 IU/mL) and liver glycogen (45.02mg/g) levels significantly improved in the diabetic rats, compared with the diabetic and non-diabetic control rats after 8 weeks study period. It is concluded that aqueous extact of stevia has anti-diabetic effects in albino rats, and therefore could be promising nutraceutical therapy for the management of diabetes and its associated complications. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by chronic hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both [ 1 ]. According to World Health Organization Diab Continue reading >>

6 Best Sugar Substitutes For Diabetics

6 Best Sugar Substitutes For Diabetics

Sodium saccharin (benzoic sulfimide) has been around since the late-19th century but gained popularity in the 1960s and 1970s as the first commercially marketed artificial sweetener. It is most commonly recognized in brands that offer them in a characteristic pink packet, including Sweet'N Low and Sugar Twin. One packet contains three grams of carbohydrate and has a glycemic index of zero. It is good for sweetening both hot and cold foods. Aspartame was first created in 1965 and approved by the FDA in 1981. It is often recognized by its trademark light blue packet and marketed under various brand names, including Equal and Nutrasweet. Aspartame only has one net carb per packet and a glycemic index of zero. It tends to lose some of its sweetness when heated. Sucralose is one of the sweetest of the artificial sweeteners and marketed in the U.S. under the name Splenda. There are other brands available, each identified by their characteristic light yellow packet. Sucralose was approved as a food additive in 1998 and as a general purpose sweetener in 1999. Sucralose has less than a gram of carbohydrate and a glycemic index of zero. It can be used in both hot and cold foods. We know healthy eating is key to help manage diabetes, but that doesn't make it easy. Our free nutrition guide is here to help. Sign up and receive your free copy! Acesulfame potassium, also known as acesulfame K or Ace-K, was discovered in 1967 and approved by the FDA for use as a general food additive in 2003. It is available as a tabletop sweetener under the various brand names, including Sweet One. Acesulfame potassium has one carb unit and a glycemic index of zero. It remains stable when heated without the loss of sweetness but is often mixed with other sweeteners to offset its slightly bitter after Continue reading >>

Stevia And Diabetes

Stevia And Diabetes

When it comes to sweets, we all love to eat them from time to time. But sugar isn't really a good option for any of us, even if we're not diabetic. So what about stevia and diabetes? Is it a good option for making sweet treats and decadent desserts? Let's dig into some info to find out. What is Stevia? Stevia is an herb from South America that has been used for centuries. Today it comes in both powder and liquid form and can be used in cakes, bakes, and anything you want to add sweetness to. It is 250 times sweeter than sucrose (sugar) and the active components are steviol glycosides, rebaudioside A and stevioside. It’s been used for the longest period of time in the Japanese food supply after saccharin was banned but can now be found throughout the world. Something most people aren’t aware of is that there is white stevia and green leaf stevia. The white powder is more chemically processed, while the green leaf is a more natural form. The liquid extract is also less processed, which is my preferred option. You can also get flavored stevia liquids, like vanilla, chocolate and so forth, which make great additions to chocolate desserts for example. I guess it just depends on preference and how you are going to use it. Still, the white powder is the most commonly consumed type of stevia because it’s readily available and easy to use. The other thing about green leaf stevia is it’s not as sweet, which is probably why it hasn't been commercialized as much. The research shows that stevia is considered safe (1). Can Stevia Cause Cancer? Question from Kathryn: Stevia has been linked to cancer in some studies. Do you consider it safe? I looked at a few studies and position statements and this is what I found. The US National Cancer Institute says there is no clear eviden Continue reading >>

How Natural & Artificial Sweeteners Affect Blood Sugar

How Natural & Artificial Sweeteners Affect Blood Sugar

I have wanted to write a post about sweeteners for a while now. Mainly because I get a little frustrated when reading or hearing outright incorrect claims about how some of the natural and artificial sweeteners affect your blood sugar. As a person with diabetes, I want to know exactly what will happen to my blood sugar when I eat or drink something, and I don’t take kindly to half-true marketing claims. I’ve decided to focus on how natural & artificial sweeteners impact blood sugar rather than on whether they are healthy or not, since I think that is somewhat out of my domain and because plenty of others have already covered that. What are natural & artificial sweeteners? FDA defines sweeteners as: “…commonly used as sugar substitutes or sugar alternatives because they are many times sweeter than sugar but contribute only a few or no calories when added to foods”. This means that regular sugar, honey, and Agave nectar/syrup don’t fall into the sweetener category. However, I do want to address these shortly before moving on to the real artificial sweeteners, since I’ve seen claims of how honey and agave won’t impact blood sugar in the same way as sugar. Honey and agave nectar Let’s start with honey because, let’s face it, it’s sugar in liquid form. It’s delicious, but an October 2015 study in the Journal of Nutrition found that when subjects were given honey, cane sugar, or high-fructose corn syrup, they saw no notable difference in blood sugar increase. As for agave, I think that the corporate marketing machine has been very clever when declaring this a health food, for as Dr. Jonny Bowden points out“..It’s basically high-fructose corn syrup masquerading as healthy food.” Agave nectar may have a lower glycemic index than sugar or honey, but Continue reading >>

On Nutrition: Is Stevia Ok, And Can Supplement Help Diabetics?

On Nutrition: Is Stevia Ok, And Can Supplement Help Diabetics?

On nutrition: Is stevia OK, and can supplement help diabetics? .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... Thank you, readers, for your comments and questions. Here are a few that caught my attention: Angie D. writes: I was reading your article (on) sweeteners and have a question about stevia. I am wondering about the safety and use of this product. Most folks think it is great as it is a natural product, but I wonder about how it metabolizes in the body. Please tell me what you can. Dear Angie, Stevia (brand names include Truvia, PureVia and Enliten) is made from compounds extracted and purified from the leaves of a South American plant species, Stevia rebuadiana. It was approved for use as a high-intensity sweetener (because its 200 to 400 times sweeter than sugar) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2008. Interestingly, this approval is only for highly purified stevia due to concerns about the safety of more crude extracts. Studies have shown that steviol glycosides the main ingredients in purified stevia sweeteners are broken down in the digestive tract and then rapidly eliminated from the body. Thus, they do not accumulate in the body. Several regulatory agencies around the world, including the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) have determined that high-purity stevia extract is safe for consumption at recommended levels by the general population, including children. Michael Q. writes: Hello, Barbara, I recently read your article on dietary supplements. I would like your opinion on a product Ive been using for Continue reading >>

Does Stevia Affect Blood Sugar?

Does Stevia Affect Blood Sugar?

Written by Jessica Bruso; Updated June 30, 2017 Using stevia to sweeten your foods and beverages can save you a lot of calories, since this sweetener, made from the plant Stevia rebaudiana, is 250 times sweeter than sugar and contains almost no calories. However, some types of stevia preparations may affect your blood sugar levels differently than others. The most studied compounds from the stevia plant are rebaudioside A and stevioside. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved only the stevia products made from purified rebaudioside A, not the stevia products made from whole stevia leaves or crude stevia extracts, since it has concerns about how these products will affect your heart, reproductive system, kidneys and blood sugar levels. Stevia won't raise your blood sugar levels, and some forms of this sweetener may actually lower blood sugar levels. A study published in Planta Medica in 2005 found that there was a dose-dependent effect of stevioside on blood sugar levels, with stevioside lowering blood glucose levels and decreasing insulin resistance in rats with diabetes. However, this research is preliminary, and the FDA-approved forms of stevia for use in food don't contain stevioside, so most of the stevia products you can buy in the baking section in grocery stores won't have this effect on your blood sugar levels. A study published in Appetite in August 2010 compared the effects of preloads before meals containing stevia in the form of stevioside with those containing aspartame or table sugar. During the day, participants who had the stevia and aspartame preloads didn't eat any more or less than the participants who consumed a table sugar-based preload, although they did consume slightly fewer calories since stevia and aspartame contain fewer calories Continue reading >>

Stevia And Diabetes | Global Stevia Institute

Stevia And Diabetes | Global Stevia Institute

If you are living with diabetes or have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes, you know that good nutrition is perhaps one of the most important factors in achieving good health. The foods that you choose to eat, as well as being physically active and taking medications, if recommend, can make a big difference in your daily health.1 There is no such thing as a one-size-fits-all diabetic diet.2In fact, it is essentially the same balanced and healthy eating plan that everyone, whether or not they have diabetes, should follow. But if you do have diabetes, then managing the amount, quality and timing of the foods you eat and beverages you drink particularly those containing carbohydrates becomes even more important. Fortunately though, having diabetes does not mean having to give up all of your favorite foods. You can literally have your cake and eat it too occasionally of course so long as you work it into your eating plan. That is where stevia fits in. It is a zero calorie, plant-based sweetener of natural origin that has been used for hundreds of years dating back to indigenous people in South America. Stevia itself contains no carbohydrates, so it does not affect blood sugar or insulin levels. And in many foods and beverages you buy, it helps cut calories while still allowing you to enjoy the sweet tastes you love. Since stevia is sometimes used in combination with other types of sweeteners, it is always important to check the ingredient list and nutrition facts panel for carbohydrate amounts to make sure the product fits into your eating plan. You will find stevia in a wide range of food and beverages, including teas, soft drinks, juices, yogurt, soymilk, baked goods, cereal, salad dressings, confections and as a tabletop sweetener. Stevia is a great option to use in recip Continue reading >>

Sugar & Sweeteners

Sugar & Sweeteners

Sweeteners that increase blood glucose (sugar) levels Sweetener Forms & uses Other things you should know Sugars (some examples) Brown sugar Maltodextrins Icing sugar Agave syrup Invert sugar Brown rice syrup White sugar Corn syrup Dextrose High fructose corn syrup Fructose Maple syrup Glucose Fruit juice concentrates Lactose Honey Maltose Molasses Sucrose Barley malt Used to sweeten foods and beverages May be found in medications Sugars are carbohydrates that can affect your blood glucose (sugar), weight and blood fats. There is no advantage to those with diabetes in using one type of sugar over another. Sugars may be eaten in moderation by people with diabetes. Up to 10 per cent of the days calories can come from added sugar. Their effect on blood glucose levels will vary. Talk to your dietitian about how to fit sugars into your meal plan. Sweeteners that don't increase blood glucose (sugar) levels Sweetener Forms & uses Others things you should know Sugar alcohols & polydextrose Lactitol Xylitol Maltitol Polydextrose Mannitol Isomalt Polyols Palatinit Sorbitol Polyol syrups Hydrogenated starch hydrolysates (HSH) Used to sweeten foods labelled “sugar free” or “no added sugar” May be found in cough and cold syrups and other liquid medications (e.g. antacids) Sugar alcohols are neither sugars nor alcohols. Small amounts are found naturally in fruits and vegetables. They can also be manufactured. They are only partly absorbed by your body, have fewer calories than sugar and have no major effect on blood glucose (sugar). Check product labels for the number of grams of sugar alcohols per serving. If you eat more than 10 grams of sugar alcohols a day, you may experience side effects such as gas, bloating or diarrhea. Talk to your dietitian if you are carbohydrate co Continue reading >>

Stevia Benefits Diabetes

Stevia Benefits Diabetes

Stevia is a 100% natural sweetener with zero calories, low on carbohydrates and has no effect on the glycemic index, which means it doesnt affect your blood sugar. The safety of stevia for human consumption has been established through rigorous peer-reviewed research and the FDA and Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives recognize it as safe. More than 200 extensive studies have been conducted on stevia attesting to its safety. If you are a diabetic, sugar is possibly one of your worst enemies. In the quest to find an alternative to satiate your sweet cravings, you have probably tried everything out there. But did you know that Stevia can help your body in a number of ways, other than just to satiate your sweet cravings. Stevia lowers blood sugar levels and fights diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, stevia is an outstanding substitute for sugar especially for diabetics. The leaf contains a compound called Steviol Glycoside that is not absorbed by the body and cannot be broken down, and is flushed out directly. It is especially good for diabetics because it stabilizes a patients blood sugar level by increasing insulin resistance, inhibits the absorption of glucose in the body and promotes the health of the pancreas. Stevia tea is one of the best concoctions to keep ones blood sugar level under control. Just put some stevia leaves in warm water for about five to seven minutes. Drink this tea either hot or cold two to three times a day. Stevia controls high blood pressure. According to a study published in theBrazilian Journal of Biologyand Technology Stevia is very useful in lowering blood pressure in people with hypertension. Although the study found that the effects on ones blood pressure are seen over one to two years, it does state tha Continue reading >>

The Best Sugar Substitutes For People With Diabetes

The Best Sugar Substitutes For People With Diabetes

With a low to no calorie sugar count, artificial sweeteners may seem like a treat for people with diabetes. But recent research suggests that artificial sweeteners may actually be counterintuitive. Especially if you’re looking to manage or prevent diabetes. In fact, the increased consumption of these sugar substitutes may correlate to the increase of obesity and diabetes cases. The good news is that there are sugar alternatives you can choose from. You’ll still want to count your intake for glucose management, but these options are far better than the marketed “sugar-free” products. Stevia Stevia is a FDA approved low-calorie sweetener that has anti-oxidant and anti-diabetic properties. Unlike artificial sweeteners and sugar, stevia can suppress your plasma glucose levels and significantly increase glucose tolerance. It’s also technically not an artificial sweetener. That’s because it’s made from the leaves of the stevia plant. Stevia also has the ability to: increase insulin effect on cell membranes increase insulin production stabilize blood sugar levels counter mechanics of type 2 diabetes and its complications You can find stevia under brand names like: PureVia Sun Crystals Sweet Leaf Truvia While stevia is natural, these brands are usually highly processed and may contain other ingredients. For example, Truvia goes through 40 processing steps before it’s ready to be sold, and contains the sugar alcohol erythritol. Future research may shed more light on the health impacts of consuming these processed stevia sweeteners. The best way to consume stevia is to grow the plant yourself and use the whole leaves to sweeten foods. What’s the difference between Truvia and stevia? » Tagatose Tagatose is another naturally occurring sugar that researchers are s Continue reading >>

Stevia For Diabetics Does It Work As Claimed?

Stevia For Diabetics Does It Work As Claimed?

How about sweetening your food despite having diabetes? No. This is not the storyline for an upcoming Hollywood science fiction movie. I dont know if you have heard of stevia before. But that doesnt matter. Because stevia Sugars cousin. But without the ill effects. This is because almost all sugar substitutes are produced synthetically. But not stevia. Stevia is derived from a plant. Which is why it is sugars good cousin. Stevia is valued for what it doesnt do. For instance, stevia doesnt add calories. The stevia plant is related to the daisy and ragweed plants. Several of the stevia species are native to Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. But the most prized species grows in Brazil and Paraguay. The people in these areas have been using the leaves of this plant to sweeten food for hundreds of years. The traditional medicine in these regions also promotes stevia as a treatment for burns, stomach problems, and sometimes even as a contraceptive. Stunningly enough, stevia is 250 to 300 times sweeter than sugar ( 1 ). But it contains no carbohydrates, calories, or artificial ingredients. Stevia For Diabetics What Does Science Say? Science says many things. And one of them is this stevia might have benefits not just for diabetics, but for other individuals as well. According to Massachusetts General Hospital, stevia is promising for people suffering from hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Stevia is made from a leaf related to popular garden flowers like chrysanthemums and asters ( 2 ). It is approved by the FDA and is known to possess antioxidant and antidiabetic properties. It can suppress your plasma glucose levels and help improve the symptoms. The other benefits of stevia for diabetics include: Increasing insulin effect on cell membranes Countering the effects of type 2 dia Continue reading >>

Stevia & Diabetes

Stevia & Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you may struggle finding foods to feed your sweet tooth that won’t raise your blood sugar. Stevia may be the answer you’re looking for. A variety of companies are now adding stevia as a sweetener to low-calorie or sugar-free foods and beverages that can be part of a healthy diet for diabetics. Video of the Day In 2008, the FDA labeled stevia “Generally Recognized as Safe” and approved its use as an artificial sweetener in the U.S. The American Diabetes Association agrees it is safe for diabetics to use to add sweetness to the diet without raising blood sugar. The University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension reports that stevia has been used safely in Paraguay for centuries. It was approved in Japan in the 1970s, and Brazil approved the use of stevia products in 1980. Stevia is currently used all over the world with China being the largest exporter. What the Science Says A study published in 2004 in the journal “Metabolism” reported that participants with type 2 diabetes had lower blood sugar levels after eating a meal supplemented with 1 gram of stevia than those who ate the same meal without stevia. In 2013, a study published in the “Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications” found that diabetic rats given diets supplemented with stevia not only had lower blood sugars, but less damage to their liver and kidneys as well. More studies are needed to determine the benefits of stevia to diabetics, but so far, the findings are promising. It Does a Body Good Because stevia is a plant, it contains a variety of vitamins and minerals including chromium and magnesium. Chromium helps maintain normal glucose metabolism and chromium deficiency has been associated with impaired glucose intolerance, although most diabetics are not deficient in chrom Continue reading >>

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