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Steel Cut Oats And Diabetes

5 Overnight Oats Recipes For Stable Blood Sugar All Morning

5 Overnight Oats Recipes For Stable Blood Sugar All Morning

Start your day with a slow-burning, nutrient dense breakfast. For five years, I followed a raw vegan diet, which completely transformed my life and body. While I no longer eat strictly raw foods, I will never forget all of the recipes that I learned along the way. The reason that I stuck with the lifestyle for so long was because it was actually super easy: I ate in abundance, and, though I ate pounds of fruit each day, I never had a sugar crash. This is because I combined my foods in a way that helped me have sustained energy for hours while my body focused on absorbing the nutrients I had consumed. So what’s to say that those same recipes can’t make an appearance in my not-so-raw-life now? And who says that you have to be vegan to benefit from them? This lifestyle oozes in healthy eating, and so any recipe that you venture to try is likely fueling your body in the best possible way. This is especially helpful for those of us with diabetes because every single bite we take makes a huge difference in our health, both short term and long term. Here are a few key nutrients that are packed in most overnight oats recipes: Omega 3s Omega 3s are like the nutritional powerhouse for diabetics. A lot of the difficulties that diabetes causes can be counterbalanced with a healthy dose of omega 3 fatty acids in the diet. Omega 3s are easily found in walnuts, flaxseeds, chia seeds, and hemp seeds. Vitamin C has been found to reduce blood glucose levels and lipids in patients with type 2 diabetes. It’s not too difficult to get your daily dose of vitamin C either as it can be found in virtually every fruit and vegetable! Vitamin E Vitamin E helps support the heart against the detrimental effects of diabetes according to the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics. Plus, he Continue reading >>

From Pre-diabetes To No Diabetes In Sight. This Guy Rocked It! + Overnight Steel Cut Oats

From Pre-diabetes To No Diabetes In Sight. This Guy Rocked It! + Overnight Steel Cut Oats

I’ve received many an email from people telling me what a bastard I am to mention weight loss as a benefit of eating a Whole Food Plant Based diet. I’m always happy to get these emails because I like hearing different viewpoints. From what I’ve gathered, there are a couple of directions that people generally take on the losing weight train. There are the people who stand up for Big is Beautiful and any mention of weight loss stems from a collective societal dictation based on unrealistic and contrived views on beauty and acceptance. (Say that three times fast) Then we have people who for whatever reason are pro weight loss. Maybe for people trying to sell stuff it’s an easy market to tap; maybe some people are hung up on supermodels, and maybe some people just feel better after they lose a few pounds. It’s different for everyone, and everyone’s view should be accepted, regardless of your take. But here’s the thing. There’s not a fine line, there’s a line the size of the Grand fucking Canyon between losing weight when one is already healthy, and losing weight to save one’s life or to add a great deal of quality to that life. The conversation about losing weight for actual health reasons transcends any conversation about whether or not the topic of weight loss puts a damper on people’s confidence and self acceptance in society. For some people, there’s no angle or agenda, losing weight for them means going from pre-diabetes to no diabetes, having high blood pressure to normal blood pressure and having high cholesterol to perfect cholesterol. So for me, mentioning weight loss as a benefit of eating a plant based diet isn’t just important; it’s really fucking important. There are people who have turned their entire world around by dropping extra Continue reading >>

Is Oatmeal Good For People With Diabetes?

Is Oatmeal Good For People With Diabetes?

Oatmeal, also known as porridge, is a popular breakfast food made from oats. There are several different types of oatmeal including rolled oats (old-fashioned), instant, and steel-cut. All oatmeal starts with whole raw oats, which are harvested and cleaned. The outer shell, or hull, is removed, leaving the edible grain or "groat" behind. People can buy and consume oat groats, but they need to be cooked for 50-60 minutes to soften. Steel-cut oats are made when the groats are chopped with a metal blade. Steel-cut oats cook more quickly - about 20-30 minutes - because they are further broken down. Rolled oats or old-fashioned oatmeal is made by steaming and rolling the groats into flakes. This cuts cooking time down to 3-5 minutes. Instant oats or "quick oats" are made by further steaming and rolling the oats, bringing the cook time down to as little as 30-60 seconds. The texture of steel-cut, old-fashioned, and instant oats differs widely, and which one is best is a personal preference. People who have tried quick oats and not enjoyed their softer texture should try the hardier steel-cut oats. The nutritional profile of each cut of oats is the same when they are plain. However, many instant oats have added sugar and flavorings and are often high in sodium. Also, the higher the level of processing, the quicker the speed of digestion, and the higher the glycemic index, a measure of how quickly blood sugar rises when eating. How does oatmeal affect people with diabetes? Oatmeal is mainly a source of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates are converted to sugar when digested and increase sugar levels in the bloodstream. Carbohydrates that have fiber cause a slower release of sugar into the bloodstream, lowering the potential spike in blood sugar after a meal. A diet that is high in proc Continue reading >>

What’s The Deal With Steel-cut Oats?

What’s The Deal With Steel-cut Oats?

Steel-cut oats are whole grains, made when the groats (the inner portion of the oat kernel) are cut into pieces by steel. Also known as coarse-cut oats or Irish oats, they are golden and look a little like small pieces of rice. They gain part of their distinctive flavor from the roasting process after being harvested and cleaned. Although the oats are then hulled, this process does not strip away their bran and germ, allowing them to retain a concentrated source of their fiber and nutrients. How do steel-cut oats differ from “rolled oats”? Rolled oats are flake oats that have been steamed, rolled, re-steamed, and toasted. All of this processing causes them to lose some of their natural taste, texture, and goodness. Steel-cut oats take longer to prepare than instant or rolled oats due to their minimal processing. They typically require 15 to 30 minutes to simmer (much less if pre-soaked), but they taste chewier and nuttier than instant oats. Steel-cut oats have a lower glycemic index than instant oatmeal (42 versus 66, respectively), causing a smaller insulin spike when consumed. The exact cause of this is undetermined, but is believed to be due to a higher proportion of complex carbohydrate. In August 1999, the FDA issued an endorsement of oats by allowing companies to promote the benefits of whole grains in relation to heart disease and certain cancers. It has indicated that diets rich in whole grains, such as oats, may reduce the risk of these conditions. Grains are essential to a healthy lifestyle and form the foundation of the food pyramid. Steel-cut oats are full of nutritional value and are high in B-Vitamins, calcium, protein, and fiber, while low in salt and unsaturated fat. One cup of steel-cut oatmeal contains more fiber than a bran muffin. Oatmeal is the Continue reading >>

Can Steel-cut Oats Reduce Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Steel-cut Oats Reduce Type 2 Diabetes?

It's no secret that whole grains are a healthy addition to any diet, but it may surprise you to discover that oats — particularly steel-cut oats — are a powerhouse food that can minimize the risk of several medical conditions, including heart disease, some cancers and type 2 diabetes. A recent study that was conducted over 10 years showed that whole grains such as steel-cut oats have some type of protective effect against the development of type 2 diabetes in women. Rolled and old-fashioned oats are steamed, rolled into flakes, steamed again and then toasted, and they lose some of their nutritional value during this process. The instant oats that many children eat for breakfast often have added ingredients, such as sugar, salt and flavorings. Steel-cut oats, however, are whole grains that undergo minimal processing so they retain a higher nutritional value and contain more complex carbohydrates than their counterparts. Glycemic Index A food's glycemic index value is an indicator of how long it takes the body to absorb it, which has a direct impact on blood glucose levels. A lower GI rating means that the body absorbs the food slowly, resulting in more stable blood glucose levels. Foods with a high GI are absorbed more quickly, releasing larger amounts of glucose into the blood over a shorter period of time, which causes unhealthy blood glucose spikes. According to Diabetes Health magazine, steel-cut oats have a glycemic index of 42, compared to other types of oatmeal, which have GI values that range from 66 to 83. This low GI rating combined with steel-cut oats' high levels of beta glucans ensures that steel-cut oats keep blood glucose levels stable after consumption and that they keep you feeling full for a longer period of time. Research presented at the 2012 Inst Continue reading >>

Making Your Oats More Diabetic Friendly

Making Your Oats More Diabetic Friendly

Oats are a good old favourite and as the weather gets colder, we start moving away from our fruit and yoghurt or cereal, to warmer alternatives. Fond memories are waking up on those chilly mornings to the smell of oats and cinnamon. Oats are extremely versatile and can be eaten as a porridge, added to smoothies, muffins, bread, muesli or granola. WHY WE LOVE OATS Oats are high in vitamins, minerals and fibre. They contain mainly soluble fibre but also small amounts of insoluble fibre. Both of these types of fibre are needed for optimum gut health.1 Beta-Glucan is the soluble fibre found in oats and has been shown to: Lower cholesterol Control appetite Aid in weight management, as it keeps you fuller for longer.1,2 Whole oats contain antioxidants called Avenanthramides, they are believed to have protective effects against heart disease.1 As oats are a low GI (Glycaemic Index) food, they get broken down and absorbed into your blood more slowly, providing you with a source of long-term energy. Due to this fact, oats can help to control your blood sugar levels, and are therefore great for people with diabetes.1,2 Steel cut oats have the lowest GI, so choose steel cut oats where possible but note they take longer to cook so make sure you allocate enough time for cooking. Oats can be made ahead of time and reheated in the morning for a quick and healthy breakfast. Oats come in different forms due to the level of processing, which varies the cooking times. Whole grain oats are called oat groats. These oat groats are commonly rolled or crushed into flat flakes and lightly toasted to produce oat porridge. The quick or instant variety consists of oats that are more thinly rolled or cut, they absorb water more easily and therefore cook faster. Oat bran, which is the fibre-rich out Continue reading >>

Low-gi Breakfast Prevents Glucose Spikes For Hours

Low-gi Breakfast Prevents Glucose Spikes For Hours

It has often been said that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and another piece of evidence has just been added in favor of this statement: Research recently presented at the Institute of Food Technologists’ (IFT) Wellness 12 meeting shows that what you eat in the morning — and in particular, the glycemic index of what you eat — can have a significant impact on your blood glucose levels throughout the day. The glycemic index of a food is a ranking from 0 to 100 indicating how much that food raises a person’s blood glucose level. Foods with a high glycemic index are quickly digested and can cause spikes in blood glucose levels, while foods with a low glycemic index are digested more slowly, resulting in a more gradual rise in blood glucose levels. A number of factors can affect a food’s glycemic index, including how finely milled the food is, what type of fiber it contains, and what type of starch it contains. At the recent IFT conference, researchers presented information indicating that eating foods with a low glycemic index at breakfast can help with blood glucose control through lunchtime. In particular, a study by Richard Mattes, MPH, RD, showed that eating approximately 33 whole almonds, a low-glycemic food, as part of breakfast caused participants to feel full for longer and to have lower blood glucose levels after breakfast and lunch than people who had not included almonds as part of their breakfast. According to Mattes, while it is important to take the calorie content of foods into account, a moderate amount of almonds can be incorporated into the diet without affecting a person’s weight. Other low-glycemic foods suggested by the IFT include rolled oats and groats, whole grains, and flaxseed. A database of the glycemic index of hundr Continue reading >>

Easiest And Fastest Way To Cook Steel Cut Oats

Easiest And Fastest Way To Cook Steel Cut Oats

I try to eat oatmeal twice a week for breakfast. It is a great way to get whole grains and, topped with blueberries or strawberries, I get a serving of fruit before I am even out the door. I love the taste, texture, and satiety of steel cut oats. What I don’t love is the time it takes to cook. It is not a part of my morning to stand and stir for 30 minutes (or more). I have discovered the EASIEST way to make steel cut oats for my whole week in just minutes. It is also fool proof – works perfect every time. The Easiest and Fastest Way to Cook Steel Cut Oats: Place 1 cup steel cut oats and 4 cups water in a medium pot. This will make 4 servings. If you only want 2 – just make half this. If you need more, well you get the picture – just use a 4 to 1 water to oat ratio. Bring the mixture to a full boil. Cut the heat off and place the lid on the pot. Place the pot on a towel in the refrigerator overnight. Next morning, heat the mixture and serve. It is the perfect doneness and thickness. Note: If you don’t need all four servings at once, just remove what you don’t need and put back in the refrigerator in a container with a tight-fitting lid. I usually make enough for my whole week on Sunday night. That way the oatmeal is ready each morning – just heat and eat. Don’t miss another great blog: Subscribe Now Continue reading >>

Oatmeal And Diabetes: The Do’s And Don’ts

Oatmeal And Diabetes: The Do’s And Don’ts

Diabetes is a metabolic condition that affects how the body either produces or uses insulin. This makes it difficult to maintain blood sugar, which is crucial for the health of those with diabetes. When managing blood sugar, it’s important to control the amount of carbohydrates eaten in one sitting, since carbs directly affect blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association’s general recommendation for carb intake is to consume 45-60 grams per main meal, and 15-30 grams for snacks. It’s also important to choose nutrient-dense types of carbohydrates over refined and processed carbs with added sugar. This means that what you eat matters a great deal. Eating foods that are high in fiber and nutrients but low in unhealthy fat and sugar can help maintain a healthy blood sugar level, as well as improve your overall health. Oatmeal offers a host of health benefits, and can be a great go-to food for those with diabetes, as long as the portion is controlled. One cup of cooked oatmeal contains approximately 30 grams of carbs, which can fit into a healthy meal plan for people with diabetes. Oatmeal has long been a common breakfast food. Oatmeal is made of oat groats, which are oat kernels with the husks removed. It’s typically made of steel cut (or chopped), rolled, or “instant” oat goats. Oatmeal is cooked with liquid mixed in and is served warm, often with add-ins like nuts, sweeteners, or fruit. It can be made ahead and reheated in the morning for a quick and easy breakfast. Because oatmeal has a low glycemic index, it can help maintain glucose levels. This can be beneficial for people with diabetes, who especially need to manage their blood sugar levels. Oatmeal in its pure form may reduce the amount of insulin a patient needs. Oatmeal can also promote heart health, Continue reading >>

Is Oatmeal Good For Diabetics?

Is Oatmeal Good For Diabetics?

Here are a few common questions and concerns that we always receive around oatmeal and diabetes: “Do u know if eating oatmeal is good for diabetics?” “I make steel cut oats in the morning and put in honey (from the honey place – real made) some chia seeds, walnuts, half an apple and pumpkin or other seeds if I have them – is this enough to balance out the sugar?” “My sugars go crazy when I eat oatmeal but I was told by a dietitian to eat it.” “I’m confused, can I eat oatmeal, not the packaged kind?” Is Oatmeal Good for Diabetics? (The Short Answer) The short answer: Oatmeal could be okay for you – some type 2 diabetics can eat it. But, it is a higher carb food and for that reason, many type 2 diabetics can’t tolerate it. Unfortunately, there is no clear answer on this, which is often the case with many individual food items. The question for you to ask is, how is your blood sugar and A1C? If you’re struggling to get it under control, you might consider eliminating the oatmeal and opting for lower carb foods (aka more vegetables). Or, you could try testing to see if oats influence your results. Is Oatmeal Good for Diabetics? (The Long Answer) Let’s explore a whole range of things to consider with oats and oatmeal – including nutrition, glycemic index (GI), research, and so forth. Research on Oatmeal and Type 2 Diabetes The research around oats/ oatmeal for type 2 diabetes treatment does show mixed results. A review in Food and Function, 2016, looked at a range of studies but only 4 of those studies included type 2 diabetic patients. An important point to raise is that the results concluded from studies in those without diabetes (healthy subjects) is NOT necessarily going to result in the same conclusions in people who already have diabetes Continue reading >>

Oatmeal For People With Diabetes

Oatmeal For People With Diabetes

The American Diabetes Association recommends whole grains, like oatmeal, as a good way to increase soluble fiber in the diet. Soluble fiber can help improve blood glucose control by slowing the absorption of sugar from the digestive system. Oatmeal can lower low density lipoprotein, or "bad" cholesterol, when it's consumed daily. People with diabetes have at least double the risk for heart disease, according to the American Heart Association, and lowering cholesterol is one way to help reduce the risk for heart disease. Video of the Day Benefits of Oatmeal A December 2013 article in "Forschende Komplementärmedizin/Research in Complementary Medicine" reported that eating oatmeal may help improve sensitivity to the blood-sugar-regulating hormone insulin in obese people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Another study in the August 2012 issue of "Nutrition Journal" found that people who consumed oatmeal daily for 6 weeks, as part of a low-fat diet based on nutritious whole foods, decreased waist size by 1/2 inch and reduced LDL cholesterol by 15 mg/dL. The control group in this study ate wheat noodles instead of oatmeal and experienced a 1/3-inch gain in waist size. LDL cholesterol dropped by 7 mg/dL in the control group. Steel cut oats are the least processed and cook in about 45 minutes. Rolled oats are slightly processed to reduce cooking time, but they still contain the whole grain and cook in about 10 minutes. Quick-cooking oats cook in even less time. Instant oatmeal contains less fiber and often contains added sugar, although plain instant oatmeal without added sugar is available. One cup of cooked oatmeal contains about 27 g of carbohydrates. Healthy toppings include a sprinkle of chopped nuts, cinnamon, berries or other fruit and low-fat milk. Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal? Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal? Our registered dietitian and CDE Amy Reeder weighs in on whether or not you should eat oatmeal. Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a masters degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. There are several foods that share a common theme among people with diabetes: they wreak havoc on your blood sugar. Pizza, pasta, and cereal are a few. Oatmeal is another. Most people report a spike in blood glucose after eating oatmeal compared to other breakfast foods. Surprisingly, for such a simple food, oatmeal can be found in many different formsinstant, slow-cooking, flavored, unflavored, plain, and chock-full of toppings. Some of the flavored oatmeals, like apple cinnamon and maple brown sugar, contain as much as four teaspoons of added sugar. Combine that added sugar with the fact that some people with diabetes are more insulin resistant in the morning time and you have a recipe for challenging blood sugar control! If you do enjoy oatmeal for breakfast (or anytime) and it does cause your blood sugars to surge, here are a few tips that might work to even things out: Cook plain, whole oats, or steel-cut oats on the stove top. These oats have not been processed as much as instant oats and take longer to digest and absorb as glucose in the bloodstream. Try the overnight oats recipe below if you only have time to heat in the morning as opposed to cook. Add your own sweetener. If you like your oatmeal a little sweet, add a touch of Splenda, agave, or honey. A little goes a long way. And theres a good chance you wont add nearly as much as the company making the flavored stuff. A few Continue reading >>

Today's Blood Sugar Experiment: Steel Cut Oats

Today's Blood Sugar Experiment: Steel Cut Oats

Today's Blood Sugar Experiment: Steel Cut Oats Steel cut oats make for a better option than instant oats. Steel cut oats have a lower glycemic index than instant oatmeal. There are some studies too in support for this. You may check an article over here, which talks of carbs present in them: www.foods4betterhealth.com/is-oatmea I eat them every day with walnuts and ground flaxseed, a little brown sugar and skim milk. I make a pot and my daughter and I heat them up when we want them. 1 cup makes about 4 servings. Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the little voice at the end of the day that says I'll try again tomorrow. Regular oatmeal, even with no milk or sugar added has always spiked my sugar too. I think I will try the steel cut oats again today and see if I get similar results. Glad it worked for you. Oats of any kind spik my numbers. Edited by: LITTLEWIND53 at: 6/17/2010 (08:08) Why don't you make a large pot and then just take out what you need for breakfast. I did that with another grain cereal and it worked out fine. Great numbers. Think I'll give them a try. You're on your way to a healthy diabetic world in a grand way. Glad to have you on the Managing Diabetes Group. Look forward to more of your 'success' posts. Some mistakes are too much fun to make only once. -Anonymous If life is a bowl of cherries, what am I doing here in the pits? -Erma Bombeck I get my stevia usually at Trader Joe's and use 1/3 of a tsp. for most things . One level tsp.in my protein chocolate milk.I hope you do well with everything! My blood sugar today has been good ,75 after my swim.Yea! It was 105 fasting. I am getting better results since working regular exercise in and tracking my food to keep in line. Welcome I have tried stevia though I have it as a small bottle of Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Steel Cut Oats

Benefits Of Steel Cut Oats

Steel cut oats differ from old-fashioned, rolled oats in only one way: Steel cut oats are not rolled flat into flakes. Instead, the whole toasted oat grain, or groat, that is used to produce rolled oats is cut into thirds to yield steel cut oats. Steel cut oats -- also called Scotch, Irish or Pinhead oats -- are nearly identical to old-fashioned, rolled oats in nutrition. A diet that includes oats may decrease your risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension and obesity. Decreased Heart Disease Risk A 2015 study published in the Clinical Nutrition linked soluble dietary fiber intake with a significantly decreased chance of developing heart disease. Oat products like steel cut oats are rich in dietary fiber, with a 1/4-cup serving containing 2 grams of soluble fiber and providing 15 percent of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's recommended daily allowance of fiber for healthy adults adhering to a 2,000-calorie diet. A Nurses' Health Study that followed nearly 70,000 women for 10 years confirmed that consuming more oats decreased coronary heart disease risk. Part of this decrease may be due to the ability of the soluble fiber in oats to inhibit the absorption of cholesterol and lower LDL, or bad, cholesterol blood levels. Diabetes Prevention According to the American Diabetes Association, steel cut oats have a low glycemic index and should feature prominently in the diets of people trying to control their blood-sugar levels. The glycemic index is a measure of how much a carbohydrate raises blood-glucose levels. Foods with a high glycemic index cause blood glucose to spike, while foods with a low glycemic index, like oats, help maintain a balanced blood-glucose level. Blood Pressure Control Oats, including steel cut oats may contain compounds that can reduce b Continue reading >>

2 Blood Sugar Lowering Breakfasts That Taste Like Apple And Pumpkin Pie

2 Blood Sugar Lowering Breakfasts That Taste Like Apple And Pumpkin Pie

Imagine waking up to the soothing smell of fresh-baked apple or pumpkin pie...only it’s a hot breakfast cereal that helps stabilize your blood sugar and stave off hunger for hours. And all you have to do is scoop some into a bowl, top with some nuts and seeds, a bit of milk and your favorite fruit, and you’re good to go. Imagine no longer. Instead, try these easy scrumptious steel-cut oat recipes that cook overnight in a crockpot. And please tell me if you like them as much as I do. Breakfast Apple Pie Yield: 4 cups 2 cups water 2 cups milk of your choice 1 cup uncooked steel-cut oats ¾ teaspoon cinnamon, or to taste 2 apples, chopped into ½” pieces 2 tablespoons packed brown sugar, or sweetener of your choice 1 tablespoon coconut oil, or oil of your choice ½ teaspoon salt Spray the inside of a crockpot well with cooking spray. Add the water and milk. In a small bowl, stir together the steel-cut oats and cinnamon and add to the crockpot. Add the remaining ingredients and mix all together. Set crockpot on low, cover and cook overnight (about 6-7 hours). Stir before serving. Any leftovers keep in the refrigerator for about a week and are easy to reheat by moistening with a little water or milk. Serving size: 1/2 cup Calories: 150 Total fat (grams): 4 Sodium (mg): 170 Total carbohydrate (grams): 24 Sugars (grams): 7 Fiber (grams): 3 Protein (grams): 4 Breakfast Pumpkin Pie Yield: 4 ½ cups 2 cups water 2 cups milk of your choice 1 cup uncooked steel-cut oats ¾ cup canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie mix) ¼ cup packed brown sugar, or sweetener or your choice 1 ½ teaspoon cinnamon, or to taste 1 ½ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice, or to taste 1 teaspoon vanilla ½ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon coconut oil, or oil of your choice Spray the inside of a crockpot well with cookin Continue reading >>

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