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Steak And Diabetes

Red-meat Intake Linked To Increased Risk Of Diabetes

Red-meat Intake Linked To Increased Risk Of Diabetes

Eating more unprocessed and processed red meat over time raises risk of type 2 diabetes. The latest nutrition news may put a damper on your desire to grill hot dogs, pork chops and T-bone steaks this summer. Increasing your intake of red meat over time is associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, says a large, long-term study out Monday. Other research has linked consumption of both unprocessed and processed red meat to diabetes, but this study tracked the risk of developing the disease over a long time because people's eating behaviors often change through the years. "This is stronger evidence that red meat consumption contributes to an increased risk of diabetes," says the study's senior author Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. For the latest study, researchers analyzed data from three Harvard studies that tracked 149,000 health-care professionals who completed questionnaires about their diets every four years. The men and women were followed for 12 to 16 years. Red meat consumption varied widely, but on average people ate 1½ servings a day. The findings, published online in JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) Internal Medicine, show: - People who increased their intake of red meat by as little as a half a serving a day (about 1.5 ounces) had a 48% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes over a four-year period, compared with people who did not change their red-meat intake. - Eating more red meat was associated with weight gain, and that weight gain accounted for some but not all of the increased risk of developing the disease. - People who decreased their red-meat intake by half a serving a day over four years did not have a short-term reduced risk of developing the dise Continue reading >>

Red Meat Linked To Increased Diabetes Risk

Red Meat Linked To Increased Diabetes Risk

HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- People who eat a lot of red meat increase their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, while those who cut down on red meat cut their risk. Those are the findings of a large new study out of Singapore involving 149,000 U.S. men and women. The researchers found that increasing the consumption of red meat can increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 48 percent. "There is no need to have more red meat on your plate; it increases the risk of diabetes," said lead researcher An Pan, an assistant professor at the Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health at the National University of Singapore. "It is better to reduce your red meat consumption by replacing it with other healthy food choices, like beans, legumes, soy products, nuts, fish, poultry and whole grains," he added. The report was published in the June 17 online edition of the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. For the study, Pan's team collected data on three Harvard group studies: the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, the Nurses' Health Study and the Nurses' Health Study II. All the participants answered questions about their diet every four years, resulting in more than 1.9 million person-years of follow-up. There were more than 7,500 cases of type 2 diabetes, the researches found. Comparing diet with the cases of diabetes, Pan's group found that people who increased their consumption of red meat by 0.5 servings per day during a four-year period were 48 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, compared with people who ate less red meat. Moreover, people who cut their red meat consumption were 14 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes, they found. Outside experts, however, argued about the findings. "Epidemiological studies made by questionnair Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

8 Great Recipes For A Diabetic Steak Dinner

8 Great Recipes For A Diabetic Steak Dinner

Our Best Low-Carb Recipes: 30 Low-Carb Dinner Recipes, Desserts, and More Eating healthy has never tasted so good with this FREE eCookbook. From low-carb breakfast recipes to low-carb dinners and even low-carb desserts, you'll be able to stick to your healthy eating lifestyle with ease! Bonus: Get our newsletter & special offers for free. We will not share or sell your email address. View our Privacy Policy Home > Editor's Picks > 8 Great Recipes For A Diabetic Steak Dinner 8 Great Recipes For A Diabetic Steak Dinner You must be logged in to add a private note. Login | Register We are adding the recipe to your Recipe Box. You must be logged in to add a recipe. Login | Register Our collection of recipes for a diabetic steak dinner will knock your socks off! Sure, we've included the classic dishes like Grilled Flank Steak , but we also have more creative entrees like our Steak Fajita Bowl. If you're looking for healthy steak salad recipes, we've got that, too! Look no further than our Marinated Steak Salad . Whatever kind of steak you're craving, we know you'll find it here! Think you can only enjoy the taste of your grilled specialties in the summer or when the weather is warm? Not so, thanks to the availability of grill pans and ridged skillets. We can savor tasty delights like Grilled Flank Steak all year 'round. By using reduced fat ingredients and no-yolk noodles, the Mr. Food Test Kitchen devised a tasty and guilt-free way for everyone to enjoy the mouthwatering taste of Homestyle Beef Stroganoff. This is one steak dinner recipe you'll want to cozy up with. If you're looking for diabetic picnic recipes, look no further! These fit any time we want the big taste of the grill, whether it's Memorial Day, July 4th, or even a winter day - 'cause our Twin Pepper Steak Kab Continue reading >>

Grilled Beef Recipes

Grilled Beef Recipes

Diabetic Living / Diabetic Recipes / Beef From grilled tenderloin to juicy burgers, these grilled beef recipes are bursting with flavor. We used lean cuts of beef and loaded up on veggies to keep these diabetes-friendly recipes low in fat, carbs, and calories. Pick your favorite, then toss it on the grill and enjoy! A sweet garlic-ginger marinade gives this grilled steak recipe its Asian-inspired flavor. Present the simple but elegant barbecued dinner on a bed of bok choy, and sprinkle the low-calorie, low-carb dish with sesame seeds and green onion. Continue reading >>

The Truth About Red Meat And Diabetes

The Truth About Red Meat And Diabetes

Not all red meat is created equal – some isn’t even good enough to even be considered food. Yet when a news article talks about red meat being bad for you, you can bet the author (or the study behind the news) failed to distinguish between processed meat and unprocessed meat, as well as overcooked meat and properly cooked meat. That’s not even considering grass-fed meat vs. industrial meat, which I’ve blogged about extensively. “Red-meat-is-bad” articles don’t always deserve a rebuttal because *most* red meat actually is bad for you. However, it’s a major mistake to say all red meat is bad for you. This post serves to confront misleading headlines about red meat and diabetes risk. Let’s ask a few questions, see what the science actually says, and talk about the Bulletproof recommendations. Processed meats like hot dogs, bologna, deli meats etc. contain high omega-6’s, often have mold toxins called mycotoxins, and nitrates that can combine with bad gut bacteria. All of these can be correlated with an increased risk of diabetes. Instead, insist on eating grass fed, low toxin meat to promote good health and optimize performance. Research Doesn’t Distinguish Between Processed Red Meat and Unprocessed Red Meat When articles suggest red meat causes chronic diseases like diabetes, you would expect a high degree of specificity and accuracy. Unfortunately all you get are alarming headlines and half-truths. When you see blog posts like “Hot Dogs, Bacon and Red Meat Tied to Increased Diabetes Risk,” you should ask yourself how the authors justify lumping hot dogs (a blend of soy, wheat, MSG, and cast off animal parts) in with meat and what the study design looked like. Of course, the recent news about diabetes referenced a study that did not distinguish h Continue reading >>

Delicious Meals For Diabetics

Delicious Meals For Diabetics

Being a diabetic, whether type-1 or type-2, doesn’t always mean that you can’t have some of your favorite meals. All it means is that you must be mindful of what you’re putting into your body, as well as the amounts that you consume. If you really have a craving for something, there is usually a way to medicate yourself properly so that you can partake. However, as any diabetic knows, the goal is to live your life in such a way that you require as little insulin as possible. With all diabetics it’s all about carbs, since diabetics don’t produce enough insulin to counteract carbohydrates (which are turned into sugar in the bloodstream). While eating no carbs is an option that some diabetics consider, it would mean forgoing a lot of delicious foods. The important thing is to know how many carbs are in each meal so that you can take the appropriate amount of insulin to counteract it. What follows are some man-friendly dinners that any diabetic can enjoy. Some might require a little more insulin, but overall there are dinners that are lighter on the carbs, heavy on the flavor and definitely filling. Having diabetes shouldn’t feel like you are shackled when you go out for dinner or when you’re having a barbecue. With a few smart choices and a little bit of thinking, you can enjoy a delicious meal that won’t make you feel like you’re missing out. (Note: Each dinner is listed with an alcoholic beverage, and every diabetic reacts differently to alcohol. Some diabetics get high blood sugar from the carbs in the beverages while others get extreme lows from the alcohol content, so be mindful of this. Dry white wines and red wines are usually diabetic-friendly, but try to stay away from mixed drinks or dessert wines.) Diabetic-friendly dinner: Steak Frites As much Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Beef?

Can Diabetics Eat Beef?

People with diabetes can eat just about any type of food as part of a balanced, portion-controlled meal or snack. The trick is knowing how much of each type of food to eat. A standard serving of lean beef, as part of a sandwich or plate of food that also includes vegetables and whole-grain foods, is a well-balanced meal for a diabetic. People with diabetes are at increased risk of developing heart disease, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. As a result, the diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association is a heart-healthy, plant-based diet that includes lower-fat sources of protein such as lean beef, but in measured portions. Lean cuts of beef that contain less than 10 grams of fat and less than 4.5 grams of saturated fat in a 3-1/2 ounce serving include tenderloin, strip steak, shoulder roast, round steak and 95 percent lean ground beef. Extra-lean cuts of beef that contain less than 5 grams of fat and 2 grams of saturated fat per serving include tenderloin, eye of round roast, top round, bottom round and top sirloin. Both lean and extra-lean cuts contain less than 95 milligrams cholesterol per serving. Choice and select cuts contain less fat than prime cuts. According to the American Diabetes Association, a balanced meal includes 2 to 5 ounces of meat. Another way for diabetics to look at it is that beef and other proteins should take up about one-quarter of the plate at each meal. A good diet includes lots of whole-grain foods and fresh fruits and vegetables. Grilling, broiling, pan-broiling, stir-frying, roasting and braising are all good methods of preparing lean cuts of beef, according to the Texas Beef Council. Different cuts of beef lend themselves to different methods. Eye round or sirloin steak is best sli Continue reading >>

Does Red Meat Increase Diabetes Risk?

Does Red Meat Increase Diabetes Risk?

Does red meat increase your chances of getting Type 2 diabetes? A new study released on June 17 by JAMA Internal Medicine has come to that conclusion, recommending that folks consume less red meat to reduce the epidemic of Type 2 diabetes. CBS News first scooped the results of the study, and the conclusions are troubling. However, despite the research, I’m waving my B.S. flag on this one, and that doesn’t stand for bachelor of science. But first, let’s address the usual counter-arguments that will come my way. No, I’m not a doctor, nor am I a nutritionist, so I wouldn’t be considered an expert in this field. Yes, I raise beef cattle, so some might say I have skin in the game. However, while I may not have the credentials to counter this study, there are others who do, and I will reference them in this post. First, a little background. Beef (namely saturated fat) was demonized in the 1970s-80s when the new mantra of “counting calories, limiting your fat and burning off excess,” became the new-age advice from the medical establishment, a departure from how Grandma grew up eating, for sure. Forget that our bodies rely on fat to thrive; doctors were now telling us that fat makes you fat. Capper is an adjunct professort at Washington State University, affiliate at Montana State University and a sustainability consultant at Merck. She says, “We need to get over the perception that fat is bad, particularly that fats found in dairy and meat are worse than fats found in olive oil. Oleic acid, which is prevalent in olive oil, is also found in grain-fed beef. This offers us protection against heart disease and diabetes. Overall, it’s important to have a balanced, healthy diet that also tastes great, too.” Meanwhile, Gary Taubes is the author of the best-selling Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Link To Meat

A Diabetes Link To Meat

Right Now | Getting the Red out [extra:Extra] Read more about Harvard’s “Healthy Eating Plate.” Also: Red-meat consumption is already linked to higher levels of colorectal cancer and cardiovascular disease (atherosclerosis, heart disease, and stroke). Now researchers from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) have added an increased risk of type 2 (adult onset) diabetes to that list. The incurable illness occurs when the body’s ability to control blood glucose levels by means of insulin secretion becomes impaired, either because of “insulin resistance” (when insulin fails to trigger effective glucose uptake by muscle or other tissues), or because production of insulin by beta cells in the pancreas declines. The HSPH investigators, led by professor of epidemiology Frank Hu and research fellow An Pan, analyzed data from three longitudinal studies of male and female healthcare professionals who were followed for 14 to 28 years. After adjusting for other risk factors, the researchers found that a daily serving of red meat no larger than a deck of cards increased the risk of adult-onset diabetes by 19 percent. Processed red meat proved much worse: a daily serving half that size—one hot dog, or two slices of bacon, for example—was associated with a 51 percent increase in risk. (The average 10-year risk of getting diabetes for U.S. adults is around 10 percent.) Why is red meat harmful? “Saturated fat, which can lead to cardiovascular disease, is really just the beginning of the story,” explains Hu. Even though it is “difficult to pinpoint one compound or ingredient” as mechanistically linked to diabetes risk, three components of red meat—sodium, nitrites, and iron—are probably involved. Sodium is well known to increase blood pressure, but it also c Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Meat (1 ounce = 7 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbohydrate, fat varies) One ounce of meat is about the size of your thumb; 3 ounces is the size of a deck of cards. No more thant 3 ounces of protein at a meal is recommended. (Try to eat meats from this page only; unfortunately, this means nothing fried.) Very Lean Meat Choices (0-1g fat/ounce and 35 calories) Poultry: Chicken or turkey (white meat, no skin), Cornish hen (no skin). Fish: Fresh or frozen cod, flounder, haddock, halibut, trout, lox, tuna fresh or canned in water. Shellfish: Clams, crab, lobster, scallops, shrimp. Game: Duck or pheasant (no skin), venison, buffalo, ostrich. Cheese: Fat-free (less than 1 gram of fat/ounce), low fat cottage cheese. Other: Processed sandwich meats with less than 1 gram fat or less/ounce, such as: deli thin, shaved meats chipped beef, turkey ham egg whites (2) egg substitutes, plain hot dogs, fat free sausage, fat free or less than 1 gram fat/ounce Lean Meat Choices (3g fat/ounce and 55 calories) Beef: USDA Select or Choice grades trimmed of fat such as round, sirloin, flank steak, tenderloin, roast (rib, chuck, rump); steak (T-bone, porter house, cubed); ground round. Pork: Lean pork such as fresh ham, canned, cured, or boiled ham, Canadian bacon, tenderloin, center loin chop. Lamb: Roast, chop or leg. Veal: Leap chop, roast. Poultry: Chicken, turkey (dark meat, no skin), chicken (white meat, with skin), domestic duck or goose (well-drained of fat, no skin). Fish: Herring (uncreamed or smoked), Oysters, Salmon (fresh or canned), catfish, Sardines (canned), tuna (canned in oil, drained). Game: Goose (no skin, rabbit). Cheese: 4.5% fat cottage cheese, grated parmesan, cheeses with 3 grams of fat or less/ounce. Other: Hot dogs with 3 grams of fat or less per ounce. Processed sand Continue reading >>

Does Red Meat Raise Blood Sugars?

Does Red Meat Raise Blood Sugars?

Recently I have heard more and more people use the phrase “I don’t eat red meat because it bad for my blood sugars.” As red meat- along with any other cuts of meat- is a food made up of only fat and protein, eating red meat will have no immediate effect on your blood sugar. Crash course in macro-nutrients Foods can be broken up into three macro-nutrient categories: Carbohydrate, Fat and Protein. Blood sugars increase when we consume Carbohydrate foods- fruits, rice, beans, pastas, breads, milk, and starchy vegetables such as corn, potatoes and winter squash. As these foods are digested into their basic components- glucose is released into the bloodstream. This glucose is what causes blood sugars to raise after eating a food containing Carbohydrates. Protein foods however do not have glucose as part of their elemental structure, instead they break down into amino acids. Amino acids aid in building muscle and repairing cells in your body. Fats can be either saturated or unsaturated fats and fuel cells providing a required source of energy for our brains for survival. Red meat Foods are often a combination of these three macronutrients. Take red meat for example: Beef contains both protein and fat, but no carbohydrates. Where then does the misconception that red meat hurts blood sugars come from? Red meat is typically high in fats, especially saturated fatty acids. Foods containing fat are higher in calories which may lead to poor weight control if eaten in excess. As mentioned before, fats are essential for brain and cell health, but the American Diabetes Association recommends limiting fats to less than 30% of total calorie consumption with saturated fats making up less than 10% calorie consumption. Saturated fatty acids are the types of fat that stay solid at room Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Warning: Too Much Red Meat And Poultry Can Increase Risk

Type 2 Diabetes Warning: Too Much Red Meat And Poultry Can Increase Risk

Dinner time favourites such as beef and lamb are high in iron, a mineral associated with triggering the debilitating disease. But even chicken thighs and drumsticks can be bad for you, say experts. The darker the meat, the greater the risk, with scientists finding a direct link between consumption and Type 2 diabetes. Almost 12 million Britons are thought to be at risk of developing the condition, which is linked to lifestyle factors such as poor diet. Analysis of more than 60,000 people shows those eating the most red meat increase their risk by 23 per cent while for those who eat a lot of dark poultry meat the risk increases by 15 per cent. Experts suggest cutting out dark meat and replacing it with chicken breast, fish, shellfish and vegetables. Dietitian Pav Kalsi, clinical adviser to charity Diabetes UK, said: “We know eating more red and processed meats is associated with a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes. “Simple changes to diet include eating less processed and red meat and instead getting protein from plant sources such as pulses, beans and lentils and from lean poultry and oily fish. “Eating more fruit and vegetables and whole grains, as well as cutting down on the amount of sugar, salt and fat in your diet can help too.” The new study, one of the biggest of its kind, looked at the diets of 63,257 people aged between 45 and 74 who took part in the Singapore Chinese Health Study between 1993 and 1998. Scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore then followed the group over the next 11 years, identifying 5,207 new cases of Type 2 diabetes. They say the association between red meat intake and Type 2 risk was “statistically significant”. Senior author Professor Koh Woon Puay said: “We don’t need to remove meat from the diet entirely just re Continue reading >>

Diabetic Beef Recipes

Diabetic Beef Recipes

Diabetic Meals , Diabetes Beef Recipes , Popular Diabetic Recipes Fire up the grill! Weighing in with just 2 grams of carb and 30 calories apiece, these low-fat veggie and beef kabobs are a healthy choice for any backyard barbecue. Marinate the flanks in our mixture of soy sauce, sesame oil, crushed red pepper, and sherry to give the meal sweet and spicy Asian flavor. Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Bacon In addition to whole-fat dairy foods, fatty or marbled cuts of meat also carry a hefty amount of saturated fat, which initiates inflammation in the body and leads to various side effects. Since those with diabetes are already at an increased risk of heart disease, eating high-fat meats puts them at an even greater risk than the average person. Instead of feasting on fatty bacon, hamburgers, bologna, hot dogs, or spare ribs, fill your plate with lean protein choices like skinless chicken and turkey, fish and shellfish, or lean pork tenderloin. Previous Next More Photos Snack Cakes and Pastries Whole Milk Continue reading >>

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