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Staying Hungry With Gestational Diabetes

Can Diabetes Cause Excessive Hunger?

Can Diabetes Cause Excessive Hunger?

Yes. No. Sort of. Well, ok, here’s the deal. The shinbone’s connected to the thighbone, the thighbone’s connected to the…. Diabetes can cause high blood sugar, and high blood sugar can give you the munchies. So diabetes doesn’t, by itself, make you hungry. It’s the high blood sugar that can come from out-of-control diabetes that does. Which is crazy, if you think about it. For the most part, the human body does a really great job of maintaining a stable state using a process of small adjustments and counter-adjustments called homeostasis. In the case of blood sugar, the body normally keeps the sugar level just right by balancing little squirts of insulin from the pancreas with little squirts of sugar from the liver. If the liver is running low on its sugar stores your body will give you an advanced head’s up that you need to refuel by sending out hunger signals. Where things get weird is that if your blood sugar is already high, the last thing you need is more sugar (in the form of food), right? But in fact, high blood sugar does cause hunger, even though you do not need more food. This is caused largely by a miss-communication within the body’s sugar homeostasis system. Every cell in your body relies on sugar from the blood for food, but they need insulin to get to the sugar. It’s insulin that moves sugar from the blood to the cells. If there is not enough insulin, or if it isn’t working very well, sugar piles up in the blood while at the same time, it’s not getting into the cells where it’s needed. Being in a state of high blood sugar is sort of like starving to death in the Chef Boyardee warehouse because you don’t have a can opener. The cells don’t really realize that there is a ton of sugar just beyond their membranes; all they know is t Continue reading >>

My Wife Won't Stick To Her Gd Diet.

My Wife Won't Stick To Her Gd Diet.

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. She was diagnosed with GD at around 25 weeks. She attended all the educational sessions to learn about the diet to follow and at first she was doing well. As time went on she gradually started pushing the limits and cheating more frequently. She is now 37 weeks pregnant and she is not sticking to the diet at all. Every day she eats several things that are supposed to be off limits, like cake, chocolate and sugar filled drinks. I've tried everything to make her stop. I'm not a good cook but I try, and what I do cook is healthy but she turns her nose up it. I went to the Dr. with her the other day and he expressed very firmly that she needs to start sticking to the diet, but it made no impact whatsoever on her. I find her irresponsible actions to be incredibility selfish, if my child is born with problems because of her I will never forgive her. This is making me extremely anxious and depressed, I've lost all respect for her and after this I have no faith in her as a mother. I don't know what to do. Sweets and other fast carbs can be very addicting at the best of times. Add to that the hormones raging through a woman's body while she is pregnant and the associated cravings and aversions and it is easy to believe that she is all but helpless to do what she needs to do. I don't know what the educational sessions told her, if it was a fairly normal one, it would be having her eating enough carbs to keep from getting free of their additive nature. One thing that you can probably do to help (if you are not already doing it) is make this both of your diets. Lead by example and keep all temptations ou Continue reading >>

Nestle Start Healthy Stay Healthy - Nutrition In Pregnancy With Gestational Diabetes | Pregnancy Health & Fitness, Nutrition, Meal Plan | Momspresso

Nestle Start Healthy Stay Healthy - Nutrition In Pregnancy With Gestational Diabetes | Pregnancy Health & Fitness, Nutrition, Meal Plan | Momspresso

Please enter the email address you signedup with. We'll send you a password reset link. Nutrition in Pregnancy with Gestational Diabetes Good nutrition is the most important part of a healthy lifestyle. As it is said, health cannot be bought but needs to be earned. Pregnancy is that brief period where one should take the optimum care when it comes to nutrition because its not about you alone but also about a life growing inside you. I believe one need to prepare their body for pregnancy by leading a healthy lifestyle and having nutritious food, months before conceiving. This acts as a foundation of a healthy pregnancy. The major nutritional demand is in the first few weeks of the first trimester when many women don't even realize that they are pregnant. This is a very important time for fetal development. Hence your body should have all the nutrients while conceiving. Therefore it is advisable to visit your doctor before conceiving so that you start on folic acid before you conceive. Folic acid is very important in the first few months of pregnancy to avoid any deformities in the fetus. Throughout the pregnancy, it is important to have a well-balanced diet. A well-balanced diet should comprise of carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, fats, minerals and water. It should include food in appropriate quantity from all the food groups. It is very natural to feel hungry almost all the time when you are pregnant. After all, its hard work and raising a tiny human isnt an easy job. However, the requirement of extra calories is only300-400calories in a day. A little increase in the serving size will fulfill the required calorie intake. However, the increased intake should not be fulfilled by eating fatty and junk food but should be done by taking a lot of proteins, fresh fruits and Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Explanation of gestational diabetes & personal reflection of what to expect if you are diagnosed during your pregnancy. Not to worry, it’s can be managed! When you’re pregnant many people love to say “Now you can eat for two!” or “Your pregnant, this is the time you can eat what you want!” Unfortunately, these words of wisdom are not entirely accurate. Every mom-to-be dreads the glucose tolerance test, which involves ingesting a high concentration of glucose (a form of sugar) mixed with water to see if you have gestational diabetes. It’s a grueling test because you have to sit in a doctor’s office or clinic for a few hours while they take blood samples before and 2-3 times after you drink the solution. Before the test, you have to fast for 8 hours and this alone makes mamas pretty aggravated but then with the drink solution you have to deal with a sugar high! Waiting for the results, you cross your fingers and hope that the last 24-28 weeks you’ve had a balanced, healthy diet. I knew that I had increased my carbohydrate and sweet intake more than before I was pregnant, but I was hoping the test would still be negative. Unfortunately, when I got the call from my doctor who then said I had gestational diabetes, my first reaction was guilt. How could I have done this to my baby? Gestational Diabetes 101 I want to make sure I disclose this up front, I am not a doctor, I’m just sharing my experience with gestational diabetes. My daily pregnancy routine consisted of exercising five times a week and eating healthy on most days. However, I knew I could have eaten healthier in the last trimester, but I didn’t (those darn cravings and ravishing bouts of hunger!). As I learned more about gestational diabetes, I realized that our bodies change so much during p Continue reading >>

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

So you’ve had the Glucose Tolerance Test, or maybe you’ve been monitoring you’re blood sugar levels at home, and your blood sugar readings were high. You have been given a diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes. If your experience was anything like mine, an Obstetrician or midwife gave you a pamphlet on ‘Diabetes and Pregnancy’, referred you to a dietician and endocrinologist for management, and then sent on your way. And now you’re at home, and all the questions you didn’t think to ask are flooding in… What the heck is it? And what does it mean? Will my baby be alright? Do I need a caesarean? Will I need to be on insulin? What can I eat? Do I have to stop eating CHOCOLATE?!?!?! There is some debate against the use of routine testing to diagnose Gestational Diabetes, and also questioning about giving the diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes as a label on pregnant women. Dr. Sarah Buckley recommends avoiding routine testing for Gestational Diabetes for most women. Henci Goer and Dr Michael Odent are among many pregnancy and childbirth professionals who argue against diagnosing women with gestational diabetes, citing unnecessary stress and interventions as one of the risks of the Gestational Diabetes diagnosis. Nevertheless, whether you want to call it Gestational Diabetes or Pregnancy-Induced Insulin Resistance, or just high blood sugar levels in pregnancy, some women do have elevated blood sugar levels and need some extra help. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM or GD) is described as a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, and usually goes away 4-6 weeks postpartum. In a pregnant woman without Gestational Diabetes, the body works ‘as usual’. You eat, your stomach breaks down your food, you start to digest it, and the glucose from the carbohydrate Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Topic Overview

Gestational Diabetes - Topic Overview

If your blood sugar level first becomes too high when you are pregnant, you have gestational diabetes. It usually goes back to normal after the baby is born. High blood sugar can cause problems for you and your baby. Your baby may grow too large, which can cause problems during delivery. Your baby may also be born with low blood sugar. But with treatment, most women who have gestational diabetes are able to control their blood sugar and give birth to healthy babies. Women who have had gestational diabetes are more likely than other women to develop type 2 diabetes later on. You may be able to prevent or reduce the severity of type 2 diabetes by staying at a healthy weight, eating healthy foods, and increasing your physical activity. The pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps your body properly use and store the sugar from the food you eat. This keeps your blood sugar level in a target range. When you are pregnant, the placenta makes hormones that can make it harder for insulin to work. This is called insulin resistance. A pregnant woman can get diabetes when her pancreas cannot make enough insulin to keep her blood sugar levels within a target range. Because gestational diabetes may not cause symptoms, it is important for you to be tested for gestational diabetes. Sometimes a pregnant woman who has symptoms has been living with another type of diabetes without knowing it. If you have symptoms from another type of diabetes, they may include: Increased thirst. Increased urination. Pregnancy causes most women to urinate more often and to feel more hungry. So having these symptoms doesn't always mean that a woman has diabetes. Talk with your doctor if you have these symptoms, so that you can be tested for diabetes at any time during pregnancy. Most women are Continue reading >>

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

Between 32 - 36 weeks are what we know to be the toughest time for gestational diabetes. It's at around this point that we typically see insulin resistance worsen. You think you have your gestational diabetes diet sussed out and you can literally wake and eat the same breakfast you've been tolerating well for weeks on end and get crazy blood sugar levels?! What the heck is going on and what did you do wrong???... Firstly, you've done NOTHING wrong! This is to be expected and is completely normal and typical with gestational diabetes. To understand what's going on, we need to understand a bit about gestational diabetes and how it works... Gestational diabetes is a progressive condition Gestational diabetes typically presents itself between 24 - 28 weeks. It is for this reason that it is around this time where screening for gestational diabetes typically takes place. It should be noted that insulin resistance can be detected much earlier than this time also, especially in subsequent pregnancies where the mother previously had gestational diabetes. Many ladies are told that earlier diagnosis means that they may have undiagnosed Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. We have found that this is not the case when ladies are tested following the birth of their baby and so we advise not panicking and waiting until you have your post birth diabetes testing before causing yourself too much distress. Further information on post birth diabetes testing can be found here. Gestational diabetes is caused by increased hormones levels from the placenta that cause insulin resistance. Those diagnosed with gestational diabetes are not able to increase insulin production to meet the additional requirement, or they cannot use the insulin which has been made effectively and so blood sugar levels remain to Continue reading >>

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Is hunger a sign of diabetes? If you don’t have diabetes, could hunger be one of the signs of diabetes? Is being hungry all of the time (polyphagia) a sign that you should go get checked for diabetes? After all, polyphagia is one of the “3 Poly’s,” is part of a triad of symptoms indicating diabetes. In addition to polyphagia, or increased hunger, the symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia are also signs of diabetes. Susan’s story Susan was constantly hunger. She never seemed to feel satisfied as she snacked off and on all day long from increasing hunger pangs. Susan’s hunger had gotten progressively worse over the past year. She noticed that she had been going to the bathroom more frequently, and wasn’t sure if she might be getting a urinary tract infection. Oddly enough, she hadn’t gained any weight. She had even lost a few pounds. She visited her primary care provider, and relayed her symptoms to the nurse. The doctor recommended that Susan be checked for several different conditions, but the one that stuck out in Susan’s mind was diabetes. She had an aunt with diabetes. She remembered how sick she got, and how she’d spend her days in the dialysis unit. Susan didn’t want diabetes, at least the kind that she knew about from her aunt. When Susan contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she was concerned that she did indeed have diabetes. She was waiting for her test results, but she was eager to find out if hunger was a sure sign that she has diabetes? I suggest reading the following articles: We decided to look into it for Susan. Let’s see what we found. Polyphagia: What is it? With polyphagia, even after having just eaten, you will feel hunger, or find that you have cravings for particular foods that monopolize your thoughts. The definition of polyphagia, wh Continue reading >>

Diabetes Hunger And Food Cravings

Diabetes Hunger And Food Cravings

Surveys find that nearly 100% of young women and almost 70% of young men sometimes have food cravings. For most people, cravings at worst add a little weight. With diabetes, they can be a serious problem. Food cravings might cause you to eat way too much of things that spike your sugars. What are food cravings, though? Where do they come from, and how can we deal with them in a healthy way? Let’s divide cravings into two types: physical hunger and emotional distress. It’s normal to feel strong hunger if blood sugar is low, or if your stomach is too empty. Then you really need to eat. If your sugar is low, you might need some carbs; if you just feel empty, some high-fiber vegetables or water might be preferable. Diabetes can cause hunger if glucose is not getting into the cells where it’s needed. Other medical causes of excess hunger include thyroid problems (such as Graves’ disease,) pregnancy, cannabis smoking, and depression. To avoid the cravings of low sugar or empty stomach, remember to eat regularly, especially breakfast. Breakfast with protein should keep cravings away at least until the afternoon. Eating may not stop some people’s low-sugar hunger. If that happens to you, you may need insulin, an insulin-sensitizing medication, or an herb such as bitter melon to get glucose into your cells. Food cravings are not always physical, though. In addition to body hunger and stomach hunger, there is what psychologist William Polonsky, PhD, CDE, calls mouth hunger or eyeball hunger. “While your stomach may be satisfied,” says Dr. Polonsky, “your eyeballs, mouth, and brain may still feel famished. If your meal plan is too limiting [in terms of food types], you may be depriving yourself of the joy of eating and the sense of satisfaction your mind and body c Continue reading >>

Coping With Gestational Diabetes

Coping With Gestational Diabetes

I got diagnosed with GD on Monday, and I have had to do quite a radical diet change but my morning sugars are too high (over 5) how did you get them lower? I don’t want to go on insulin and I am following the rules to the letter. How did you cope and regulate everything? It seems to me that before diagnosis I was eating less now I am eating small meals what feels like constantly (every 2 hours) GD – gestational diabetes (Medical disclaimer: Tips provided need to be considered in conjunction with medical advice. For immediate concerns, please contact HealthDirect (Australia wide) ph 1800 022 222 – to talk to a registered nurse 24hrs a day, and in emergencies call 000.) * Note diabetes needs to be carefully managed by your medical team* I was diagnosed with GD at 26 weeks. I found a few things that helped lower sugars. Firstly always have protein with your carbs. I found things like chicken and eggs always bought my levels down. So eat more protein. Secondly I started walking for 40 minutes every morning and noticed a huge difference. My levels dropped drastically. Keep a food diary as everyone is different and responds differently to certain foods, eg I couldn’t eat low gi raisin toast or bananas but could eat pasta, low gi soy and linseed bread etc. I always had a glass of milk before bed too. You will work out what works for you. My boy was born at 38 weeks healthy and 6lb 13oz. Good luck! Pip I had the same problem. I did end up on insulin, but what helped for a while was having a protein based snack right before bed. No carbs, just protein. Also, every time I woke up I drank some water. Also remember guidelines are just that, guidelines. I stressed out completely, worried I was making my baby sick as I couldn’t get those morning numbers under control (rest Continue reading >>

What If I’m Still Hungry?

What If I’m Still Hungry?

Often women on the GDM diet still feel hungry and more than likely it’s because they aren’t actually eating the recommended daily amount of carbohydrate. First check you’re eating the recommended amount of carbs at all meals and all snacks. All the recipes here at GestationalDiabetesRecipes have the main carbohydrate containing ingredients listed in bold so you know what they are and can adjust to your diet. You can also add a little more protein to your diet, such as lean meat, tofu or eggs as this won’t affect your glucose levels and can make you feel far more satisfied. But too much additional protein can still affect your weight so don’t go overboard. Non-starchy vegetables or ‘free vegetables’ are fine to eat as much of as you want. They will help to keep you feeling full but won’t affect your glucose levels or your weight and are full of nutrients for you and your baby. Drinks such as diet cordials and diet/Zero soft drinks are acceptable if you want to drink something other than water (or some low fat milk). It is up to you whether you want to include foods that are artificially sweetened in your diet. There is no evidence they cause harm in pregnancy but many women still prefer to avoid them. Certain condiments that you may use to cook with and flavour foods such as soy sauce, mustard, vinegar, lemon juice, chilli and garlic, are still okay. See the ‘free foods’ list below for more examples. You may feel extra hungry if you are eating bland foods because you aren’t sure what you can and can’t have. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes – 3 Common Diet Mistakes

Gestational Diabetes – 3 Common Diet Mistakes

Today’s guest post “Gestational Diabetes – 3 Common Diet Mistakes” is written by registered dietitian and gestational diabetes expert Lily Nichols. When the doctor said “You have gestational diabetes,” you practically broke down. You thought it couldn’t happen to you and now you’re completely overwhelmed trying to figure out how to manage it. Maybe you were given a glucose meter to check your blood sugar and you’re afraid of poking your finger. Maybe you were told your baby will come out big if you don’t change your diet. Most of all, you’re terrified that you might need insulin. For some women, changing their diet and exercise is all that’s needed to lower blood sugar. Actually, diet and exercise are the primary treatments for gestational diabetes. That means there is a chance you won’t need medicine or insulin. Only your medical provider can make that call. As a perinatal dietitian and diabetes educator for women with gestational diabetes, I’ve heard all of these concerns and more. The women in our OB/GYN office are lucky, because they get a full hour-long class with me to learn the ins and outs of eating to manage gestational diabetes. Plus, I continue to see them throughout their pregnancy, because what worked at 24 weeks might not work at week 36. Those first few days (or weeks) after diagnosis and before they see me are rough. Most ladies end up starving themselves in an attempt to control their blood sugar because they don’t know any other way. Luckily, there’s another way. Here are the 3 most common diet mistakes women make before they come to my gestational diabetes class: Mistake #1 – Eating Low Fat We’ve been told for so long that “fat will make us fat” or “low fat diets are healthy,” so it seems like reducing fat i Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

See active discussions on July 2011 Babies Okay so I am borderline with gestational diabetes and have to *** my finger 2 times a day. Thank you OB for changing it from 6 to 2! Anyways, has anyone else been diagnosed with it? If so, where are good preggo gestational diabetes meal plans? I've been good monitoring it but I'm still always hungry. I was supposed to go see a dietician but decided not to when she got real ignorant with me on the phone. I have it too- but have to test 4x a day. My doc had me go to a nutrition class for women with GD. I didn't feel like I learned a lot, but after a few days, I think I'm getting the hang of it. Here's what I have learned: 1. Must eat breakfast! Absolutely no cereal unless it's old fashioned, cook from scratch oatmeal. Breakfast should have protein and starch. No fruit or milk. A little fat is ok (bacon, eggs and a slice of whole wheat toast is great, can mix begins into you eggs if you want) 2. Must have 3 snacks a day- each with 15g carb and 7g protein. Some ideas are a slice of toast with peanut butter, or some crackers with cheese. Snacks are between breakfast and lunch, between lunch and dinner, and right before bed (this snack needs a little dairy too- 8oz glass of milk). 3. Lunch and dinner are similar- 1 fruit, 1 milk, 2-3 ounces of protein (a serving is 7g) and 1-2 serving carb (a serving is 16 ounces). Both meals can include any veggies you like (FYI- corn and potatoes are carbs, not veggies) 4. The number one rule I was told is that if sugar (of any kind, corn syrup, honey, molasses, etc) is in the first 4 ingredients, you cannot eat it, no matter what. This is tricky because a lot of whole wheat bread contains honey. 5. You can eat lean cuisine and frozen type dishes if you ready the back- just don't go over the carb Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Hungry For Too Long

Gestational Diabetes - Hungry For Too Long

Gestational diabetes - hungry for too long This board covers the second and third trimesters (week 13 onwards). Visit our Pregnancy section for more tips and advice. You can even sign up for our week by week pregnancy emails . Or if you are looking for other members with babies due at the same time, pop in to our Pregnancy and Due Date Clubs forum where you can meet other mums who are due when you are. Gestational diabetes - hungry for too long Hi everyone. I am 29 + 2 and have been diagnosed with gestational diabetes from last week, thing is I've been told to test at home which I do but they said a hour before breakfast and a hour after which is... Fine. What I'm struggling with is when I've been told that between night before and morning before i do test before breakfast there should be a 8 hour fasting gap every through out the night. I wakeup because I'm so hungry at around 2am and then at 7 I'm starving but can't eat because I have to test and wait an hour but is anyone else having this problem should I contact MW and tell her this or is this the way I'll have to carry on Continue reading >>

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Meal plan You need to eat and drink at least 12 carbohydrate choices each day. Most women need 14 carbohydrate choices each day to maintain the desired weight gain of one-half pound each week. If you follow a vegetarian diet, you need 15 to 16 carbohydrate choices each day to get enough nutrients. At breakfast, include: 2 to 3 carbohydrate choices (30 to 45 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At lunch, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At dinner, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For a morning snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an afternoon snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an evening snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely Breakfast tips Blood glucose is hard to control in the morning when the hormones that boost your blood glucose levels are released. To help, follow these breakfast tips: Eat a small breakfast. Eat whole-grain bread products. Eat a food that has protein. Do not eat cereal or fruit. Do not drink fruit juice at breakfast or any other time of the day. Fruit juice raises your blood glucose very quickly. Completing a meal plan Vegetables Most vegetables do not raise blood glucose. Vegetables supply many nutrients for both you and your baby. Try to eat at least four servi Continue reading >>

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