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State Diabetes Programs

National Diabetes Prevention Program

National Diabetes Prevention Program

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) is an evidence-based lifestyle change program for preventing type 2 diabetes. It can help people cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half. The Diabetes Prevention Program research study showed that making modest behavior changes helped participants lose 5% to 7% of their body weight—that is 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person. These lifestyle changes reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58% in people with prediabetes. Participants work with a lifestyle coach in a group setting to receive a 1-year lifestyle change program that includes 16 core sessions (usually 1 per week) and 6 post-core sessions (1 per month). For more information about the National Diabetes Prevention Program curriculum, go to www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention or watch the CDC's Diabetes Prevention Program video online, or download and print the National DPP Infographic (PDF). What Is the Benefit of Being Part of a National DPP? Various organizations throughout Utah will soon be part of the National DPP, led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It is proven to help people with prediabetes prevent or delay development of type 2 diabetes. Being part of a group provides support from other people who are facing similar challenges and trying to make the same changes you are. Together you can celebrate successes and find ways to overcome obstacles. Eligible Participants The target for this program are adults 18 and older who are at high risk for developing Type 2 diabetes based on fasting glucose or A1C or via a short risk survey. You can download and print the CDC Prediabetes Infographic (PDF) for more information. National DPP Features Trained lifestyle Continue reading >>

Cdcs Funded State & Local Programs To Address Diabetes

Cdcs Funded State & Local Programs To Address Diabetes

To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: CDCs Division of Diabetes Translation (DDT) funds state and local health departments to support programs and activities to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes and to improve health outcomes for people diagnosed with diabetes. CDCs funding and activities are part of two multi-program cooperative agreements. State Public Health Actions to Prevent and Control Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and Associated Risk Factors, and Promote School Health Cooperative Agreement (1305) This cooperative agreement funds all 50 states and the District of Columbia to carry out work on diabetes; heart disease and stroke; nutrition, physical activity, and obesity; and school health. States use 1305 funding to implement activities in four focus areas, called domains. Learn more about the Four Domains of Chronic Disease Prevention [PDF - 988 KB] and State Public Health Actions - 1305 . Four Domains of Chronic Disease Prevention Cooperative Agreement (1305) Change policies and physical surroundings to reinforce healthful behaviors and expand access to healthy choices. Improve the effective delivery and use of clinical and other high-value preventive services. 4. Community Programs Linked to Clinical Services Help patients prevent and manage chronic diseases, with guidance from their health care providers. Diabetes Prevention and Control Activities Under State Public Health Actions - 1305 Under State Public Health Actions - 1305, CDC addresses diabetes prevention and control activities with an emphasis on two of the domains - supporting health care system interventions (Domain 3) and community programs linked to clinical services (Domain 4). Increase use of diabetes and other chronic disease self-management programs Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Part Of The Wisconsin Chronic Disease Prevention Program

Diabetes: Part Of The Wisconsin Chronic Disease Prevention Program

Diabetes in Wisconsin Diabetes is a costly, complex, and devastating chronic illness that poses a major public health problem. Approximately 356,000 adults and 6,500 children and adolescents in Wisconsin have been diagnosed with diabetes.1,2,3 It is estimated that an additional 138,000 have diabetes but are undiagnosed.4 Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in Wisconsin, incurring an estimated $3.9 billion annually in health care and lost productivity costs.5 Each year, more than 1,300 Wisconsin residents die from diabetes and many more suffer disabling complications such as heart disease, kidney disease, blindness, and amputations.6 This burden is higher among minority populations. Much of the health and economic burden of diabetes can be averted through known prevention measures. Nearly 4 out of 10 Wisconsin adults has prediabetes. Modest behavior changes can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in people who have prediabetes. 2 out of 5 Wisconsin adults are expected to develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Diabetes causes high blood glucose (blood sugar) levels that can lead to serious health problems. Diabetes and the Wisconsin Chronic Disease Prevention Program The Wisconsin Chronic Disease Prevention Program (CDPP) works with health systems, health care providers, insurers, and professional organizations across the state to support a healthier Wisconsin by improving the prevention and management of diabetes. With funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the CDPP manages several projects to enhance coordinated systems of care, promote clinical best practices, and support patient self-care and health literacy. Increasing use of diabetes self-management programs and chronic disease self-management programs in communit Continue reading >>

Diabetes State & Local Programs

Diabetes State & Local Programs

CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation (DDT) funds state and local health departments to support programs and activities to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes and to improve health outcomes for people diagnosed with diabetes. The Problem More than 29 million people (9.3% of the US population) are estimated to have diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes. An additional 86 million Americans aged 20 years or older (37%) have prediabetes, which can lead to type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Many people with prediabetes don’t know they have it. Among adults, about 1.7 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed each year. Diabetes is a serious disease that can lead to health complications including heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and amputation of the legs or feet. Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2010. CDC’s Funded State and Local Programs to Address Diabetes CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation (DDT) funds state and local health departments to support programs and activities to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes and to improve health outcomes for people diagnosed with diabetes. CDC’s funding and activities are part of two multi-program cooperative agreements (a funding mechanism where CDC provides additional guidance and support beyond simply overseeing and monitoring activities) that address type 2 diabetes; heart disease and stroke; nutrition, physical activity, and obesity; and school health. Chronic diseases frequently happen together and are the result of risk factors that are related. The strategies to prevent and manage these health conditions are often similar. By combining approaches, public health programs can work together and learn from each other to be more effective Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Florida Department Of Health

Diabetes | Florida Department Of Health

Diabetes is a life-long disease that affects the way your body handles glucose, a kind of sugar, in your blood. Your body changes most of the food you eat into glucose, which your body uses for energy. Your blood takes the glucose to the cells throughout your body. Your blood always has some glucose in it. But too much glucose in the blood is not good for your health. Diabetes means that your blood glucose (sugar) is too high. The glucose from food needs insulin to get into the body's cells. Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood. If your body does not make enough insulin or the insulin does not work right, the glucose can't get into the cells, so it stays in the blood. This makes your blood glucose level high, causing you to have diabetes. New: Diabetes Advisory Council Legislative Report The Diabetes Advisory Council, in conjunction with the Department of Health, the Agency for Health Care Administration, and the Department of Management Services, has submitted its first biennial report on diabetes to the Governor, Speaker of the House, and President of the Senate. Continue reading >>

Illinois Diabetes Prevention And Control Program

Illinois Diabetes Prevention And Control Program

Illinois Diabetes Prevention and Control Program Home Topics & Services Diseases and Conditions Diabetes Illinois Diabetes Prevention and Control Program Illinois Diabetes Prevention and Control Program Diabetes is serious chronic disease that poses a major public health problem. More than 827,000 adults in Illinois have been diagnosed with diabetes, and each year more than 2,700 residents die from the disease. Many more suffer from complications such as heart disease, vision loss, and amputations. The burden of diabetes is even higher among minority populations, such as African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, American Indians, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders. With the return of the diabetes program to the Illinois Department of Public Health through Governor Quinns Executive Order, the Department is working to improve the health of people at risk for, or affected by, diabetes. Please explore the numerous professional and general diabetes resources on this website to learn more about diabetes and this program; they are located in the right-hand column under the sections titled Resources and Publications. As of July 1, 2010, the Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, which had been part of the Illinois Department of Human Services (DHS) since 1997, was transferred to the Illinois Department of Public Health. Governor Pat Quinn signed Executive Order 6 (2010) on April 1 to set this reorganization in motion. The diabetes program had moved from the Illinois Department of Public Health in 1997 as part of the restructuring of the states human services delivery system that created DHS. With that change, Illinois became the only state in the country in which the diabetes program was not part of the state health department. By returning the program to public health, it b Continue reading >>

Diabetes Program Home

Diabetes Program Home

To achieve these goals, the program supports the following activities: Prevention of type 2 diabetes and its complications. Quality Improvement for better diabetes care. Quality Diabetes Education Initiative to increase access to quality diabetes self-management education and support. Epidemiology and Surveillance of diabetes, its complications and risk factors. Evaluation to improve program performance, account for our public health actions, and share lessons learned. Partnerships and Coordination to share resources, and increase the scope and effectiveness of interventions. The Montana Diabetes Program Fact Sheet summarizes our program activities, key statistics, and contact information. To see how we are working with schools, worksites, healthcare systems, communities, and the environment, and with other public health programs in Montana,go to the Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion Bureau page. The State Public Health Actions (1305) and the Four Domains of Chronic Disease Prevention Infographic shows howwe are part of a national effort for chronic disease prevention and health promotion. From 2013 to 2018, the Montana Diabetes Program is implementing a work plan underthe State Public Health Actions to Prevent and Control Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and Associated Risk Factors and Promote School Health (1305) grant funded by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention .The objectives of this work plan can only be accomplished through the joint efforts of healthcare leaders, insurers, public health agencies, policy makers, and healthcare organizations serving Montanans, and the engagement of the people of Montana. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage State Laws and Programs Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws and Programs This is a policymaker and consumer guide to state insurance mandated coverage, Medicaid coverage and state-sponsored diabetes programs. It was published 2011and updated material was added January 2016 All state law diabetes mandates and minimum coverage requirements for state-regulated health insurance policies. The tables include the enacted state laws passedsince the firstmandates inCalifornia (1981) and New York (1993). Use links below to go directly to state-based information: State Medicaid diabetes coverage terms and conditions. All Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) diabetes coverage. Contact information and an overview of federal funding provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to state-sponsored diabetes prevention and control programs (DPCPs). DPCPs represent the front line in battling diabetes in most states. An overview of other state activities and initiatives, such as creation of diabetes coordinator positions in the executive branch to fight diabetes. Federal Health Reform.The federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) signed March 2010, has led to changed and expanded coverage termed "EssentialHealth Benefits." Newly Released: NCSL Survey:Diabetes Drug coverage: A new survey of2016 Insurance Plans in 50 states, examining 1) patient access to the scores of diabetes drug treatments and2) results in the 46 states with laws mandating or offering diabetes coverage. NCSL original research, published summer 2016. [Read the report] December 2015: " Diabetes: Addressing the Costs; A 50-State Budget Survey for FY 2014 ." NCSL released its latest diabetes report, taking a closer look at programs and budget appropriations that play a role in con Continue reading >>

Public Health Services: Diabetes Program - Delaware Health And Social Services - State Of Delaware

Public Health Services: Diabetes Program - Delaware Health And Social Services - State Of Delaware

Our program provides the following services and activities for Delaware residents: Implement programs to control the ABCs: A1c blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol; Support programs using evidence-basedbest and promising practices; Build strong partnerships with health and community organizations across Delaware, state agencies, and national diabetes and heart healthorganizations; Promote integrated health systems to maximize support of all people with or at risk of diabetes and heart disease; Provide primary prevention programs for people with pre-diabetes; Provide equitable and culturally appropriate approaches to promote diabetes and heart disease prevention among racial, ethnic, and other priority populations; Promote the use of and adherence to treatment guidelines for diabetes; Provide training and technical support to health professionals; Support blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol control; and vaccinations; Provide speakers, programs, products, and educational materials for people with diabetes, pre-diabetes, heart disease,or who are at risk of developing these diseases; Provide nutritional education programs for people with, or at risk for,chronic health conditions, and for care givers and health professionals; Promote the use of ElectronicHealth Records for early identification and toimprove the quality of health for patients with uncontrolled diabetes and hypertension; Promote early detection and diagnosis of diabetes and hypertensionin clinical settings; Conduct public awareness campaigns focusing on prevention or control of diabetes and hypertension,andtheir complications; Support community screenings for diabetes, pre-diabetes and/or hypertension; and Collect and disseminate data on the burden of diabetes and heart disease in Delawar Continue reading >>

Diabetes Home Page

Diabetes Home Page

Idaho Diabetes Prevention and Control Program Thank you for your interest in the Idaho Diabetes Prevention and Control Program. This website was developed to help people with prediabetes and diabetes manage their conditions by connecting them to free and reduced-cost resources within their communities. It also provides a central location for healthcare professionals who treat and educate Idaho adults with prediabetes and diabetes to access resources. The Idaho Diabetes Prevention and Control Program works with partners throughout the state to reduce disability and death due to diabetes and its complications. It is the goal of the Diabetes Program to: Improve the public's access to affordable, high-quality diabetes care and services, especially for people at high-risk. Educate the public and health professionals on how to prevent and manage diabetes. Develop programs and projects with partners that prevent diabetes and reduce the health complications related to diabetes. Facilitate the statewide Diabetes Alliance of Idaho (DAI), which is made up of health professionals, diabetes educators, local public health districts, health plan representatives, pharmaceutical companies and other partners invested in diabetes care. Continue reading >>

Home | Diabetes Prevention And Control

Home | Diabetes Prevention And Control

The current browser does not support Web pages that contain the IFRAME element. To use this Web Part, you must use a browser that supports this element, such as Internet Explorer 7.0 or later. Alaska Diabetes Prevention and Control Program - Home Are you at Risk for Diabetes? Take the test> Enroll in the FREE on-line program: TurnAround Health! If you have prediabetes, you can take advantage of a FREE 1 year subscription with PROMO Code: Alaska2015. SIGN UP Today! 1 in 3 U.S. adults has prediabetes. 9 out of 10 adults with prediabetes don't even know they have it. Diabetes Public Service Announcement (PSA) Campaign: Do you have DIABETES? You can learn how to manage your disease... Diabetes can result in many serious health problems including kidney disease, nerve damage, blindness, skin conditions, Attend Diabetes Self-Management classes to learn the skills needed in the day-to-day management of diabetes, how to feel better, and avoid complications. The Alaska Diabetes Prevention and Control Program focuses on: Monitoring the burden of Diabetes in Alaska Providing education and information to the Alaskan public Developing community-based Diabetes programs throughout Alaska Translating research into clinical practice by helping provide professional educational programs Partnering with other organizations to provide resources to Alaskans We understand the need for resources to help inform patients about Diabetes, and their risk. Do you know the American Medical Association and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have developed a toolkit to help prevent Diabetes. Find out more ! There are Diabetes Prevention Programs (DPP) available in Alaska. One of the barriers for DPP is outreach to eligible clients. We need providers to actively refer to this program. Find out Continue reading >>

About Type 2 Diabetes

About Type 2 Diabetes

What is Type 2 Diabetes? If you have diabetes, take this challenge. Your A1C level is an important indicator of long-term blood sugar control, but about one-third of adults with diabetes are not at their A1C goal. Join Tim McGraw and pledge to work with your doctor to get to your A1C goal (and your family or friends with diabetes as well). Find out more » Did you know that the Mississippi State Department of Health Office of Preventive Health is available to offer A1C screenings for state employees at Mississippi State agency's events? Find out more » Diabetes is an incurable disease that affects the way the body uses food. Diabetes causes glucose levels in the blood to be too high. Normally, during digestion the body changes sugars, starches, and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Glucose is carried to the body's cells and, with the help of insulin (a hormone), is converted into energy. In healthy people, blood glucose levels are kept within normal ranges by proper insulin function. People develop type 2 diabetes because the cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin properly. As a result, the amount of sugar in the blood increases, while the cells are starved of energy. Over time, high blood sugar damages nerves and blood vessels, leading to complications such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation. Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Prevented? In this video, people with pre-diabetes talk about how the CDC's group lifestyle change classes helped them learn and keep healthy habits. Full size » Yes. The National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that moderate diet and exercise that results in 5 to 7 percent weight loss can delay Continue reading >>

Programs & Initiatives In Communities Diabetes Prevention

Programs & Initiatives In Communities Diabetes Prevention

Prevent type 2 diabetes with the Diabetes Prevention Program Find education and support across Minnesota for people who have prediabetes or are at high risk for type 2 diabetes. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-led, proven lifestyle change program that can help people with prediabetes cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half. A trained lifestyle coach works with participants to teach lifestyle skills needed to make lasting changes — like eating healthier, adding physical activity and managing stress. The goal of this year-long program is for participants to lose 5 to 7 percent of their body weight and gain 150 minutes of weekly physical activity. Program participants meet weekly for 16 weeks over an initial six-month period, and monthly over the next six months. The DPP curriculum is based on findings from the Diabetes Prevention Program research study, a randomized controlled trial conducted by the National Institutes of Health. This study showed that people with prediabetes who lost a modest amount of weight — 5 to 7 percent, or about 15 to 20 pounds for most people — reduced their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58 percent over a three year period. Diabetes Prevention Program The DPP is offered across Minnesota in health care, community and worksite settings. Find a nearby program by following one of these links below. Learn about diabetes management at: Programs & Initiatives in Communities – Diabetes Management Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention And Control Program

Diabetes Prevention And Control Program

DSMES Alphabetic Listing.pdf The Kentucky Diabetes Prevention and Control Program (KDPCP) is a population-focused public health initiative consisting of a network of state, regional, and local health professionals, as well as numerous public and private partners, working together to reduce the new cases of type 2 diabetes and reduce the sickness, disability, and death associated with diabetes and its complications. Community mobilization (state and local coalitions), Diabetes and prediabetes group education, The searchable Diabetes Resources Directory offers diabetes resources to locate classes, support groups and coalitions by county and surrounding area. In addition, the directory contains direct links to sites that list diabetes specialists and educators by location. Kentucky National Diabetes Prevention Programs The National Diabetes Prevention Program led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) incorporates lifestyle changes which are proven to prevent type 2 diabetes. Organizations offering the CDC recognized Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) in Kentucky are listed in the resources below: Kentucky Diabetes Self Management Education and Support Programs DiabetesSelf-Management Education and Support (DSMES) can help you learn how to manage your diabetes as part of your daily life. DSMES has been proven to: Improve blood sugar control leading toa decreased risk for diabetes complications Increase self-confidence about taking care of your diabetes Increase healthy eating and physical activity An accredited or recognized program means that the program has met national quality standards for DSMES. See the DSME map below for programs near you. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes And Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes is a chronic disease in which blood sugar (glucose) levels are above normal. The rate of new cases of diagnosed diabetes in the United States has begun to fall, but the numbers are still very high. The New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) is working to reverse the diabetes epidemic in New York State by focusing on diabetes prevention, identifying people with prediabetes, and collecting data on prevalence of diabetes to help improve the health of all people with diabetes. Diabetes in New York State 1.6 million New Yorkers (10.0%) have diabetes The percentage of New York State adults who have diabetes increased from 6.3% in 2000 to 10% in 2014 Diabetes in the United States 29.1 million Americans have diabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States The total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes in 2012 is $245 billion For more information, visit: Prediabetes Before people develop diabetes, they almost always have prediabetes first. Prediabetes is a condition where a person's blood sugar level is higher than normal but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes affects 86 million people in the United States (4.5 million New Yorkers), and 90% of the people with diabetes do not know they have it. Without lifestyle changes, 15-30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. People with pre-diabetes are also at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, and for having heart disease and stroke. The good news is that people can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by: Participating in a CDC-recognized diabetes prevention lifestyle change program (NDPP) to learn skills and get resources to help make healthy changes Losing small amounts of weight (5 to 7 percent of total body weight) Making heal Continue reading >>

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