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Starting A Diabetes Support Group

Uw Students Start First Type 1 Diabetic Support Group On Campus

Uw Students Start First Type 1 Diabetic Support Group On Campus

UW students start first type 1 diabetic support group on campus Kassidey Short was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes as a young child at the age of five, whereas Andy Zeigler received the same diagnosis only ten months ago. Together they are spearheading an effort to create a support group for UW students with diabetes. When Kassidey Short realized that there wasnt a support group for people like her, she knew she had to do something. Short is a type 1 diabetic, which means that her pancreas does not produce insulin, a hormone that regulates the amount of glucose in the blood. Although she is a typical college senior in every other regard, the work it takes to manage her diabetes amounts to a full-time job. While searching online, she found the website for the College Diabetes Network, which explained how to start a chapter at your own school. Through connections at Seattle University, Short met senior and fellow diabetic Andy Zeiger, with whom she joined forces in order to provide a much needed resource on campus. Together, they have started the first type 1 diabetes support group at the UW, and only the second group of its kind in the entire state of Washington. The group now has nine members, and seeks to provide a community in which people can talk about day-to-day issues with those who truly understand the difficulties of living with a chronic illness. Currently, the group is in the process of becoming an official RSO. The reality is one in every 300 people has type 1 diabetes, Zeiger said. At a school like UW, with 30,000 people, that means that about 100 people probably have type 1 diabetes. And thats what blew my mind. There was nothing at UW for type 1 diabetics. While Short has had diabetes since she was six, Zeiger was only diagnosed this past year. After losin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Support At School

Diabetes Support At School

I am a firm believer that groups can make all things fun, not just bearable. In almost 20 years of school guidance counseling, Ive had kids in support groups laughing even when dealing with such heavy topics as grief and divorce. Over the last three years I have developed and led a support group of middle school students who have Type 1 diabetes. And they have been grinning, snickering, and laughing out loud! If your school or community does not offer a support group for teens with diabetes, perhaps you need only to ask for one. Thats what happened in my case. A parent of a recently diagnosed child commented to the school nurse, in my presence, that she wished there were a support group somewhere for such kids. Knowing next to nothing about Type 1 diabetes, I stepped up. How do you initiate such a group at your childs school? First, you need to contact a guidance counselor or the school nurse to find out if there are enough students with Type 1 diabetes to form a group; an effective group needs at least four members. (The same general approach would likely work well for a group of students with Type 2 diabetes, although you might need to alter some of the activities suggested here.) Then you need to ask the counselor to consider becoming its leader. Emphasize the emotional and social benefits of having such a group. Point out that a group will help students realize they are not alone in coping with this condition, and that group members will form a close bond with each other as they express feelings that only others with diabetes can fully understand. In a group setting, they can learn from each others mistakes, discuss uncomfortable situations that arise, and buoy one another with hope. It should be hard for the counselor to ignore your plea, especially if you come eq Continue reading >>

Finding Your Way In A Type 2 Diabetes Support Group

Finding Your Way In A Type 2 Diabetes Support Group

Finding Your Way in a Type 2 Diabetes Support Group Coping with type 2 diabetes is easier if you have support from others learning the ropes of diabetes management. Here's how to get the most out of a diabetes support group. Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes can be overwhelming. After all, managing the condition can often mean overhauling your lifestyle. While friends and family can be there to help, getting support from others with type 2 diabetes can improve your outlook and make it easier to create your new normal. Type 2 diabetes typically develops after lifestyle habits have already been formed, so theres a disruption in whats considered normal for someones daily routines, says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, a diabetes lifestyle expert for Livongo Health, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, author of "Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies," and a diabetes support group leader. With the diagnosis of diabetes, lifestyle changes are usually required, which can put a detour in your normal path, she says, adding that support from people who are on that same journey can be comforting and helpful. A study on the attitudes, wishes, and needs of those with diabetes, conducted at Penn State College of Medicine, found that 46 percent of people with diabetes suffered from negative social and psychological experiences as a result of their diabetes, according to a September 2014 report in Diabetes Care. But the researchers also discovered that despite the difficulties, having a positive outlook and seeking support from others were some of the most helpful tools in combating the challenges of diabetes . People with diabetes often feel that, as much as their families and friends love them, theyre isolated and Continue reading >>

Start Your Own Effective Type 2 Diabetes Support Group

Start Your Own Effective Type 2 Diabetes Support Group

Start Your Own Effective Type 2 Diabetes Support Group Start Your Own Effective Type 2 Diabetes Support Group Many of the following ideas have been used effectively in online support groups for many years. They definitely work. I've combined these ideas with the health support group structure used for many decades, very effectively, by La Leche League (LLL). LLL is an excellent model for diabetes activists, because they succeeded very well in promulgating health information that flew in the face of contemporary medical practice without alienating doctors or those who they wanted to reach. Their belief that babies did better if nursed seems tame nowadays, but when they started out in the 1950s, their message was radical.That it is now mainstream is mostly due to their efforts. For that reason, LLL makes a very good model for those of us with diabetes who would like to save others from the blindness, amputation, kidney failure and heart attack death that is almost guaranteed by the lackadaisical way that mainstream health organizations and family doctors currently treat Type 2 Diabetes. Don't attempt to convert people who are sure their doctor is giving them all the care they need. Look for people who are concerned about their poor blood sugars and know that they need help in improving them. Don't debate people who aren't interested. Just mention that you're holding a support group using some new techniques for blood sugar control that have been very effective. As people in your group succeed, a ripple effect will reach others who might not be interested at the outset. Don't Identify the Group with any Specific Dietary Approach Make it clear that no one will be told that they have to eat some specific diet. Stress the group's approach is to help people learn what it is t Continue reading >>

Implementing A Diabetes Management Program In A Community Pharmacy, Part 2 - Drake University

Implementing A Diabetes Management Program In A Community Pharmacy, Part 2 - Drake University

Implementing a Diabetes Management Program in a Community Pharmacy, Part 2 Implementing a Diabetes Management Program in a Community Pharmacy: Part 2 of 3 So, what did you learn from your SWOT analysis? Are you offering a needed service in your area? Who is your specific competition, and what are their weaknesses or strengths. Here are some specific things you can do to get started. Some obvious ideas are to run prescription reports on diabetes medications to find out your diabetes population, ask your diabetes patients if they have had education or would be interested, and contact your competition (discreetly?) to inquire about availability classes, prices etc. It may be helpful to contact local drug/glucometer representatives for support and input. If there is a local diabetes support group, one could contact them. If not, start your own support group for ideas or to assess local population needs. Do you have a good relationship with local physician? Do they see a need? Will you need further diabetes education training? If so, where will you seek it? ( Drake University offers an excellent program.) Of course, it is important to consider your co-workers. What does your staff think? What does your management think? What do YOU think? Now that you have officially decided that you want to start a diabetes program, what is next? First of all, you must decide what type of services you are offering. Will the service be education only and center around newly diagnosed or poorly controlled patients? These patients would be good for group sessions, if you have the space. Another option is to offer diabetes management only. In this case, you would follow patients between physician visits. For this I would recommend individual consults. In order to see the best outcomes, I would Continue reading >>

Starting A Diabetes Support Group

Starting A Diabetes Support Group

Are you a doctor, dietician or pharmacist? Do you live in an area where your diabetic patients don't have access to local Diabetes SA branch meetings? Then start a support group. Are you a doctor, dietician or pharmacist? Do you live in an area where your diabetic patients don't have access to local Diabetes SA branch meetings? Then help start a support group. The purpose of a support group is to provide information, education, encouragement and support to specific diabetic groups (i.e. parent or teen groups), or diabetics in areas not within easy access to local branch meetings of the Diabetes South Africa. Branch role in establishing support groups Where a known number of diabetics exist, clinic and day-hospital sisters, doctors, dieticians and pharmacists should consider starting a group for their patients and others in the area. Any lay person who is a diabetic and shows interest and is keen to learn more about diabetes and would like to interact with other diabetics should be encouraged and assisted to get a group going. After this, the local Diabetes SA branch should be contacted to help take the process further. Branches should advertise in the newsletter and make it known at meetings and in talking to members and others as mentioned that they are looking for someone to help get a group started in a specific area. The branch should offer to access a list of members in the area concerned and assist the person starting a group with advertising of meetings and sending out invitations. Once a group has started, the branch should monitor the group on a regular basis and continue to encourage and assist if necessary. The branch should try and involve the groups in their area in fund-raising, membership drives, awareness campaigns, as well as any symposiums or general Continue reading >>

So You Want To Start A Support Group?

So You Want To Start A Support Group?

Its a big step, but it may be one youll be glad you took. The ADA promotes the role of support groups in diabetes care. In a friendly setting where diabetes can be discussed openly and knowledge can be shared, the disease becomes less intimidating. Group leaders dont need to be certified diabetes educators, but its recommended that they have some training in facilitating a group. The ADA is in the early stages of developing a program to help group leaders learn to be as effective as possible. If youre interested, the ADA would like to hear from you. Contact Cindy Bennett at the American Diabetes Association at (800) 241-4556. Or write: Support Group Program, 3783 Presidential Parkway, Suite 102, Atlanta, GA 30340. This research was presented at the 22nd Annual Meeting and Educational Program of the AADE in Boston, August 1995. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website. A few facts about me in case you are new to my column and site. My life in the diabetes community started at a young age as the secret keeper of my maternal and paternal Grandmothers. They both had type 2 diabetes and my days spent alone with them exposed me to their mi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Support Group At Mlhs

Diabetic Support Group At Mlhs

The Diabetic Education Department at Mille Lacs Health System will be starting a new Diabetic Support Group, beginning Wed., Jan. 20. The group will be meeting on the third Wednesday of every month thereafter in the North Conference Room in the Long Term Care Wing of the MLHS Onamia campus, from 4 5 p.m. For the few first meetings, attendees will be met in the Onamia clinic lobby at 4 p.m. for those who are unfamiliar with the location. Diabetic education helps patients better understand and manage their disease through discussions regarding healthy eating, glucose monitoring, exercise, and diabetes medication. The group setting is a great environment for emotional support in dealing with the common frustrations surrounding managing diabetes, as well as learning, because the patients learn from each other and their experiences, said Tammy Hall, MLHS Diabetes Educator and facilitator of the support group. Included in the groups activities will be guest speakers, cooking demonstrations, and professionals who can provide tips regarding topics such as exercise for the diabetic patient. The support group in Onamia is new; there is also a support group that meets in Isle at the IREC on the first Tues. of every month , from 4:30 5:30 p.m. For more information, call Tammy Hall at 320-532-2337. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Support Group

Diabetes Support Group

Has anybody in the forum started a community diabetes support group? I live in a very small town (3,000 pop.) and would like to start or help to start a support group for diabetics.The nearest town with a support group is a 2 hour drive away, and there are 2 mountain passes to go over to get there, so a group in our town would be wonderful. Has anybody here had any experience in putting together a support group? I'd like some tips about how to get started, what kind of format we should use, can we get medical professionals to help out- any and all advice would be welcomed. Has anybody in the forum started a community diabetes support group? I live in a very small town (3,000 pop.) and would like to start or help to start a support group for diabetics.The nearest town with a support group is a 2 hour drive away, and there are 2 mountain passes to go over to get there, so a group in our town would be wonderful. Has anybody here had any experience in putting together a support group? I'd like some tips about how to get started, what kind of format we should use, can we get medical professionals to help out- any and all advice would be welcomed. This reply will not answer all your questions because I live in a metropolis, but I am a member of a hospital-sponsored T1 support group. The group is MCed by a psychotherapist who is also T1. This, I believe, makes a great difference. We meet every two weeks, and have either a preselected topic to discuss or we just play it by ear. Either way, there is much to learn from each other's experiences and thoughts. Topics that we have covered include use of pumps vs. MDI; fluctuating carb ratios; discrimination, including in the workplace and the bedroom; who needs to know of your condition; complications; travelling, including what to Continue reading >>

Diabetes Support Group

Diabetes Support Group

Occurs: Tuesday, April 10 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Galter LifeCenter, 5157 N. Francisco Ave. Meet us in the Diabetes Community Center on the 2nd floor To RSVP or to learn more, please call Muna Siddiqi(certified diabetes educator) at 773-878-8200, ext. 2596. Occurs: Tuesday, May 08 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Galter LifeCenter, 5157 N. Francisco Ave. Meet us in the Diabetes Community Center on the 2nd floor To RSVP or to learn more, please call Muna Siddiqi(certified diabetes educator) at 773-878-8200, ext. 2596. Occurs: Tuesday, June 12 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Galter LifeCenter, 5157 N. Francisco Ave. Meet us in the Diabetes Community Center on the 2nd floor To RSVP or to learn more, please call Muna Siddiqi(certified diabetes educator) at 773-878-8200, ext. 2596. Occurs: Tuesday, July 10 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Galter LifeCenter, 5157 N. Francisco Ave. Meet us in the Diabetes Community Center on the 2nd floor To RSVP or to learn more, please call Muna Siddiqi(certified diabetes educator) at 773-878-8200, ext. 2596. Occurs: Tuesday, August 14 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Galter LifeCenter, 5157 N. Francisco Ave. Meet us in the Diabetes Community Center on the 2nd floor To RSVP or to learn more, please call Muna Siddiqi(certified diabetes educator) at 773-878-8200, ext. 2596. Occurs: Tuesday, September 11 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Galter LifeCenter, 5157 N. Francisco Ave. Meet us in the Diabetes Community Center on the 2nd floor To RSVP or to learn more, please call Muna Siddiqi(certified diabetes educator) at 773-878-8200, ext. 2596. Occurs: Tuesday, October 09 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Galter LifeCenter, 5157 N. Francisco Ave. Meet us in the Diabetes Community Center on the 2nd floor To RSVP or to learn more, please call Muna Siddiqi(certified diabetes educator) at 773-878-8200, ext. 2596. Occurs: Tuesday, November 13 6:3 Continue reading >>

Running A Diabetes Support Group?

Running A Diabetes Support Group?

By Malina8 Latest Reply2015-07-18 05:24:22 -0500 My Community Health Foundation has contacted me to run a #T1D support group. We don't have one here and upon inquiry they have asked me to start one. Even though I'm SUPER EXCITED I'm equally nervous. Not only have I never run one I've never been to one. Any thoughts or suggestions? That is fantastic! I am always in support of you guys who can start up a group that meets face to face. I run another kind of meeting, but one thing we do it pick a couple of topics to discuss, have something goofy to do, and always give them something in their hand to walk out with to help them remember what they learned at the meeting. You will find what works for you and your group through some trial and error, but always, always have a good time. That's what keeps them coming back. I am also starting a peer run diabetes support group, for all types of diabetics, this Fall. So, congrats on this, I think it will be a great learning opportunity for both of us. My group will be meeting once monthly, with a health professional joining the group for a portion of the meeting to discuss whatever their particular topic may be. (I've lined up a yoga instructor to discuss stress managment, a naturalist to discuss natural medicine, a dietitian to discuss carb counting and hope to line up more soon). I plan to leave the last half of the meeting open for people to have free and open discussion of their choice. It could be surrounding the topic that was covered that night, or it could be around issues they are having in their own lives at the moment. One thing I am going to do is Gabby posted yesterday (i believe it was) a list of "tip sheets" and I will be printing these out as hand outs, the link for this is : there is a lot of good information, parti Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Starting A Support Group For Patients With A Chronic Condition - Pba Health

5 Tips For Starting A Support Group For Patients With A Chronic Condition - Pba Health

5 Tips For Starting a Support Group for Patients with a Chronic Condition Where do your chronically-ill patients find support? Your independent community pharmacy can provide expert knowledge on the prescriptions and products needed to manage a lifelong illness, such as diabetes. And, while the personal touch your business delivers to help a patient cope with a chronic illness diagnosis is superb, sometimes what patients living with a chronic condition need is support and encouragement from similarly-affected individuals. Implementing community support groups can create an environment of hope and positivity for individuals with chronic conditions. They also provide a welcome space for chronically-ill patients to learn how to cope with the emotional stress related to their disease, to learn how to properly manage their condition and to get the chance to meet other patients who know exactly what theyre going through. Here are five tips to start a successful support group at your independent pharmacy. The first step to organize an effective support group is to determine what condition to focus on. To do this, conduct an analysis of your patient base. Whos coming to your pharmacy? What prescriptions are you filling the most? What supplementary products for chronic conditions are purchased most in your front end? If a majority of your pharmacys patients are diabetic, implementing a diabetes support group might be the smartest choice to focus on. When implementing a support group, its prudent to use both inside and outside help. Though your pharmacy team can help patients with breast cancer manage their medication regimen, you may not be as well-informed on the mental health aspect or non-pharmacy related treatment options for patients with breast cancer. To make your pharma Continue reading >>

Start A Program | Peers For Progress

Start A Program | Peers For Progress

Program Development and Management: Four Phases As illustrated below, starting or strengthening a peer support program often goes through four phases: Organizational Readiness, Program Development, Program Implementation, & Evaluation. All phases are critical to program sustainability. Learn more about how to start a peer support program The Chronic Illness Peer Support Networks Best Practice Framework covers major aspects of developing and managing a volunteer-based, chronic illness peer support program. The World Health Organizations Global Evidence of Community Health Workers (CHWs) provides programmatic overview and recommendations that can help to design and manage a peer support program utilizing CHWs for various diseases/conditions. This Peer Support Resource Manual by British Columbia Ministry of Health Services describes formal and informal structures of peer support program for adults with mental illnesses. This Peer Support Program Manual by the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine et al provides a comprehensive overview for starting a peer support program for Individuals with brain injury and their families. Building an Effective Peer Support Program is an online manual published by CIL-NET, a program of the IL-NET national training and technical assistance project for centers for independent living. Peer Specialist Toolkit Implementing Peer Support Services in the Veterans Health Administration Live, Learn and Share A Diabetes Peer Support Group Guide for the Black Caribbean Community provides information, step-by-step guidance and resources for people living with diabetes to start a Diabetes Peer Support Group. Peer Support for HIV Treatment Adherence This comprehensive manual for program managers and supervisors of peer workers was developed by the Harlem Adhere Continue reading >>

How To Start A Diabetes Support Group For 2018

How To Start A Diabetes Support Group For 2018

Research has shown that people who join a peer support group to find out how to live well with diabetes become more confident about managing their condition, and can experience less emotional distress. There are around 30 support groups run by volunteers or local health professions providing peer support in Queensland. The membership and structure of each group is different. Some groups include people living with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Others groups may be more specific and focus on diabetes type, age, and life-stage. There are small informal groups who meet at a member's home, other groups have a more structured approach with a facilitator to run the meetings in a community hall, while others choose to catch up on line. Regardless of the format or venue, many people with diabetes, their family, carers and friends, find support groups are a valuable resource and a way to cope. They are a place where people can comfortably share information, talk about their own experiences, feel empowered and get confirmation that their feelings are 'normal'. ''I joined a Support Group to be around like-minded people. They made me feel welcome and I also gain a better understanding of my diabetes. I have made lasting friendships over the years,'' is how one of our members described her experience. Diabetes Queensland and the NDSS provide a valuable link for people living with diabetes in Queensland to their local support groups. If you want to know more about Diabetes Support Groups, how to locate a group near you, or if you are interested in starting a support group in your area, please contact us on the NDSS Helpline 1300 136 588 or go to Find a Support Group to search for a support group near you. Here's more information on Peer Support for diabetes. We kicked some goals fo Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Support Group

New Diabetes Support Group

Type 2 diabetes is a major cause of heart disease, stroke and limb amputation, and it is a major health concern in San Antonio and south/central Texas. More than one in seven people in San Antonio has been diagnosed with diabetes, and one in three people over the age of 65 are living with the disease in our area. Former paramedic David Crowley was diagnosed with diabetes in 1988. By 2008 his kidneys were failing and he had to undergo dialysis to survive. After multiple hospitalizations, in 2013 David lost his left leg to diabetes. It wasn’t until 2016 that hope arrived. “Last year God blessed me with a kidney,” says Crowley. “Since then I have made it my mission to help other people living with diabetes know that they are not alone. I want them to know that they’re going to make it through. You’re going to have rough and good times but just because you trip and fall doesn’t mean you’re dead in the water, you get back up.” Crowley approached Mission Trail Baptist Hospital about starting a diabetes support group. “They were so supportive of me when I was really low,” Crowley remembers. “Katie Ivey from Pastoral Care would come to my room every day and pray with me. Sharing with one another and encouragement that can be found in a support group setting will be very helpful to people who are struggling with the disease.” Mission Trail loved the idea, and the Diabetes Support Group was born. Meetings are held the third Tuesday of each month, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Mission Trail Baptist Hospital, located at 3333 Research Plaza, San Antonio, TX 78235. Refreshments are served, and physicians are available to provide diabetes education and answer questions. For more information or to reserve your seat, please call: (866) 309-2873 If you are a me Continue reading >>

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