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Starch And Diabetes

Starch-blocking Foods For Diabetics?

Starch-blocking Foods For Diabetics?

How did doctors treat diabetes before insulin? Almost a thousand medicinal plants are known antidiabetic agents, including beans, most of which have been used in traditional medicine. Of course, just because something has been used for centuries doesn’t mean it’s safe. Other treatments for diabetes in the past included arsenic and uranium. Thankfully many of these other remedies fell by the wayside, but scientific interest in the antidiabetic potential of beans was renewed in the past decade. Diabetes is a global public health epidemic. Although oral hypoglycemic medications and injected insulin are the mainstay of treatment of diabetes and are effective in controlling high blood sugars, they have side effects such as weight gain, swelling, and liver disease. They also are not shown to significantly alter the progression of the disease. Thankfully, lifestyle modifications have proven to be greatly effective in the management of this disease. And if there is one thing diabetics should eat, it’s legumes (beans, chickpeas, split peas, and lentils). Increased consumption of whole grains and legumes for health-promoting diets is widely promoted by health professionals. One of the reasons is that they may decrease insulin resistance, the defining trait of type 2 diabetes. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes, the Canadian Diabetes Association and the American Diabetes Association all recommend the consumption of dietary pulses as a means of optimizing diabetes control. What are pulses? They’re peas and beans that come dried, and are therefore a subset of legumes. They exclude green beans and fresh green peas, which are considered more vegetable crops, and the so-called oil seeds—soybeans and peanuts. A review out of Canada (highlighted in my video, Dia Continue reading >>

Starches | Food And Nutrition | Living With Diabetes

Starches | Food And Nutrition | Living With Diabetes

Living with diabetes means developing a lifestyle that allows you to control the disease while staying active. To learn more Tips and advice Food and nutrition At the grocery store By using the same dishes every day, you will gradually be able to judge the correct amount of starches. Foods belonging to the starches group contain carbohydrates [a1] and some protein [a2]. Therefore, they have a direct impact direct on your blood glucose (sugar) levels, hence the importance of closely monitoring how much of them you eat. pasta and other cooked grains (rice, barley, couscous, quinoa) specific vegetables (plantain, winter squashes, yams, corn, parsnip, sweet potatoes, green peas and regular potatoes). Here are two tips to help you quickly determine the serving size of your starches: A quarter (1/4) of your plate should be composed of starches. The size of your fist is the equivalent of about 250ml (1cup) of starches, or 30 to 45g of carbohydrates, or two to three exchanges of starches based on the Diabetes Qubec Exchange System[a3]. By using the same dishes every day, you will gradually be able to judge the correct amount of starches without having to measure. Make use of reference points on your dishes: design elements, shape, the level reached in a bowl, etc. Starches come in many forms: the flavours and ingredients used can vary widely. Moreover, for the same amount of carbohydrates, the impact on blood glucose levels can differ from one food to another. For example, the impact of rice on your blood glucose levels can differ depending on the type of rice, even when the amounts are identical. Along with noting the results of your blood glucose tests, add comments about the meal. This can be useful in revealing the unexpected effects of specific foods on your blood glucose Continue reading >>

How To Use Raw Potato Starch To Fight Diabetes

How To Use Raw Potato Starch To Fight Diabetes

Starch has a pretty bad rap in the healthy eating community, but what if we told you there's a special type of starch that's really good for you? Yes, it exists and is found in raw potato skins. This good starch is called 'resistant starch' and helps you to lose weight, increase metabolism and maintain your blood sugar levels, which is good news for diabetics. Resistant starch is the kind of starch which does not get digested in the small intestine, which is how it got its name. The bacteria in the intestines instead process the starch to create good molecules that help to build healthy gut bacteria and balance blood sugar levels. Basically, when you eat resistant starch, it literally resists the digestion process and doesn't cause a blood sugar or insulin spike. You can think about resistant starch as a fertilizer or compost for producing healthy intestinal bacteria or gut microbiome, which has a huge impact on nearly every aspect of your health. Researchers have found the connection between gut bacteria imbalances to diabetes, obesity, heart disease, depression, bowel diseases, anxiety, and autism. One of the best ways to get your gut balanced is to consume prebiotics, which helps your intestinal bacteria to thrive. Prebiotics are found in various forms such as soluble fiber from psyllium husks or high amylose plants like potatoes, rice and green bananas and resistant starch is actually a prebiotic. When a resistant starch enters the gut, numerous species of bacteria ferment and digest the starch. This process helps create various good bacteria that will also eliminate the bad type of bacteria. When your intestines begin to heal, they can function optimally to digest your food and properly assimilate the nutrients. When the good bacteria flourishes, they regulate you Continue reading >>

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

Forget what you've been told—a diabetes diagnosis does not mean you've been sentenced to a life without carbs. Well, doughnuts may be off the list, but the right carbs can and should be part of a balanced diet for everyone, explains Anna Taylor, RD, a registered dietitian at Cleveland Clinic. In fact, for those with (type 1 or 2) diabetes, getting enough good-for-you carbs is essential for keeping blood sugar levels under control. The key is to pick carb-containing foods that are also rich in fiber and/or protein, nutrients that actually slow the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates, resulting in a more gradual rise and fall of blood sugar levels. Here are Taylor's top 10 diabetes-friendly carb picks, all of which pack additional nutrients that can help prevent chronic conditions or diabetes complications down the line. Lentils and Beans gettyimages-84763023-lentils-zenshui-laurence-mouton.jpg Lentils and beans are excellent sources of protein and fiber. The 19 grams of carbs from a half cup serving of cooked lentils come with 9 grams of protein and 8 grams of fiber (3 grams per serving is considered a "good" source of fiber; 5 and up is considered an "excellent" source, per FDA guidelines). One thing to note: You get the same benefits from canned beans as you do from cooked, dried beans—but you may want to rinse them first, which can eliminate more than 40% of the sodium. (Diabetes doesn't have to be your fate; Rodale's new book, The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes, shows you exactly what to eat and do to prevent the disease—and even reverse it.) Peas Black-eyed, split, and classic green peas have protein and fiber benefits similar to those of beans and lentils. One cup of green peas (before cooking) packs 8 grams of protein, 7 grams of fiber, and 21 grams of c Continue reading >>

Nearly Half Of American Adults Are Pre-diabetic Or Diabetic

Nearly Half Of American Adults Are Pre-diabetic Or Diabetic

These foods supply important nutrients that are often low in diabetics and pre-diabetics, and linked to conditions like stroke, heart disease, hypertension, gastrointestinal ailments and obesity About half of all American adults are either pre-diabetic or diabetic. Even one-third of normal-weight adults may also be pre-diabetic without knowing it Diabetes is rooted in insulin resistance and malfunctioning leptin signaling, caused by chronically elevated insulin and leptin levels. This is why treating type 2 diabetes with insulin does not resolve the problem Dietary recommendations for diabetics include a diet high in healthy fats, moderate protein and low in net carbs. Nine specific superfoods for diabetics are also reviewed By Dr. Mercola As of 2012, up to 14 percent of the American population had type 2 diabetes, and as much as 38 percent were pre-diabetic. This suggests about HALF of all American adults are either pre-diabetic or diabetic.1,2 At least 20 percent of the population in every U.S. state is also obese3 — a condition that severely predisposes you to diabetes. That said, being skinny is not a blanket assurance of health. Recent research suggests one-third of normal-weight adults may also be pre-diabetic without knowing it.4 Children are also getting fatter and unhealthier. According to recent research, 7 million children in the U.S. have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and close to one-third of these kids also have either pre-diabetes or diabetes.5 Great Britain has also seen a rapid rise in these conditions. In 2003, 11.6 percent of people in Great Britain were diagnosed with pre-diabetes. That number had tripled by 2011, reaching over 35 percent. As noted by BBC News,6 "The world is facing an 'unrelenting march' of diabetes that now affects ne Continue reading >>

Resistant Starch

Resistant Starch

Sorry i mean my bg fasting is 90. In the morning and after meals 119 or 125 my dr wants me to take metformin its been 3 weeks and i cant get myself to take it .I was diagnosed 3 months ago so why now?? D.D. Family type 2 since January 27th, 2016 I did a bit of reading on it. Sounds like a bunch of wishful thinking to me. I did a bit of reading on it. Sounds like a bunch of wishful thinking to me. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Seen it mentioned a few times but never saw anyone with good results with it the things fade after a few days. Resistant starch improves insulin sensitivity I have had good results with resistant starch. It improves insulin sensitivity, especially for people who are insulin resistant. It does not seem to work for people who are insulin sensitive, though. In fact, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a qualified health claim in December of last year that resistant corn starch helps reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, based on 8 published clinical trials. You have to have really impressive data to get the US FDA to approve anything, so you know there's something there. The clinical studies show that you need to take 15-30 grams of resistant starch a day to see the improvement in insulin sensitivity. Many friends have reversed prediabetes and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes back to normal blood sugar levels using Hi-maize resistant starch, the brand used in the clinical trials. It is very hard to get these kind of quantities in foods alone, but you could try. Looking more closely - It may be different for people with T2D compared to prediabetics. Most of the clinicals have been done with prediabetics, overweight and/or non-diabetic participants. I have seen only one clinical measuring insulin sensitivity in well controlled type 2 Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

Resistant Starch And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Resistant Starch And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Resistant Starch and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Volpe, Stella Lucia Ph.D., R.D., L.D.N., FACSM Stella Lucia Volpe, Ph.D., R.D., L.D.N., FACSM, is professor and chair of the Department of Nutrition Science at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA. Her degrees are in both Nutrition and Exercise Physiology; she also is an ACSM Certified Clinical Exercise Physiologist and a registered dietitian. Dr. Volpes research focuses on obesity and diabetes prevention using traditional interventions, mineral supplementation, and more recently, by altering the environment to result in greater physical activity and healthy eating. Dr. Volpe is an associate editor of ACSMs Health & Fitness Journal. Disclosure: The author declares no conflict of interest and does not have any financial disclosures. A colleague of mine asked if I would write this Nutritionists View on resistant starch and its effects on type 2 diabetes mellitus. I thought this would be an interesting article to write. Before discussing research on resistant starch and health, it is first necessary to define what resistant starch is. Starch is the primary form of plant carbohydrate; however, the digestibility of starch can vary among different starchy foods. There are different types of starches, and they are classified as rapidly digestible starch, slowly digestible starch, or resistant starch ( 1,7 ). These classifications are based on the rate of glucose released and the absorption of that type of starch within the body. Resistant starch is not digested in the small intestine. Resistant starch can be fermented in the large intestine, and because of this, purported health benefits include increased absorption of some minerals, fuel for probiotic microorganisms, prevention of colon cancer, decreased risk of gall stone product Continue reading >>

Intense Exercise, Blood Sugar And Resistant Starch 1

Intense Exercise, Blood Sugar And Resistant Starch 1

My results with resistant starch has been nothing short of amazing. To confirm earlier results, I decided to again test intense exercise, blood sugar and resistant starch. Resistant starch muted blood sugar spikes from foods Resistant starch has muted intense exercise spikesl If you do not know about resistant starch (potato starch), please read these two posts. “Diabetes and Resistant Starch Experiment” and also this post, “ Resistant Starch and Diabetes Q&A“. After having much success with potato starch including a previous resistant starch experiment with Intense Exercise. I decided to go at it again to retest my previous experiment. Exercise and Blood Sugar If I go for a walk, it typically reduces my blood sugar. If I leisurely lift weights or perform weight resistance I usually receive a slight bump. The more intense a workout, generally the larger the blood sugar spike. Overall, intense exercise and weight resistance is a major benefit to diabetics (to all) for a variety of reasons. When I work out intensely, I typically have a blood sugar spike. It’s not unusual for me to receive a 40-60 point pop. I don’t like it, but for me it’s not damning because I usually start out in 70’s to 80’s mg’dl range. Too the blood sugar rise is FAST and it usually goes down as fast. Add Resistant Starch to the Equation At 10:30 AM I tested my blood sugar. BAM! … 61 mg/dl, Most ‘experts’ will tell you that 70 – 100 mg/dl is normal range. Below 70 is considered ‘hypoglyemic’. I personally love to be in the 60’s and 70’s. Prior to my current resistant starch experiment, I was typically in the 70’s and 80’s mg/dl overnight fasting blood sugar, now… I am LOVING this lower range. The key point for most other diabetics since most do not maintain t Continue reading >>

No Starches, No Sugars — Then What?

No Starches, No Sugars — Then What?

People around the world are eating low-carbohydrate diets to treat their diabetes. But all plant foods, other than seeds, are carbs. So what can you eat? Is it all animal products, or are there other options? We know the arguments against eating carbs. Other than fiber, carbs are either sugars or starches that break down into sugars. Since people with diabetes have little to no effective insulin, which is necessary for handling sugars (glucose), they probably shouldn’t eat them. But is this argument totally true? Perhaps not. Vegans and vegetarians tend to eat a lot of carbs, and many of them seem to do quite well with diabetes. Many people in poor countries who cannot afford meat also have relatively low rates of diabetes. So what’s their secret? What are they eating? It seems clear that the successful ones eat very low amounts of refined sugars and simple starches. They may have small amounts of truly whole grains (not stuff that is marketed as “whole grain” but is actually highly processed). They eat small amounts of fruits and starchy vegetables. (Diabetic low-carb guru Dr. Richard Bernstein says he hasn’t eaten a piece of fruit in decades.) What’s left? Well, from a carb standpoint, you can eat as much animal food, like meat and eggs, as you want. They don’t have any carbs (although dairy products do). You can vary that with sea animals — they don’t contain carbs either. There are probably a few health risks from eating so much meat. Your toxic load will be higher, unless you consistently eat organic free-range meat and wild-caught, small fish. You might get too much fat if you overdo it, but advocates like Bernstein have found no problems for themselves or their patients. However, from the standpoint of your wallet, the animals, and the planet, e Continue reading >>

Why Resistant Starch Matters

Why Resistant Starch Matters

Would you believe me if I told you that potato starch can help drop your sugars and reduce your weight? Let me explain about an important nutrient that you can easily add to your diet. We know that ‘starch’ is bad for us, it converts into glucose and sends blood sugars sky high - so what makes this so different? Resistant starch is also known as the 3rd type of fibre. It is a substance that your body can’t digest but for the friendly bacteria in your digestive system it’s their food. It is resistant to your digestion. Many studies have demonstrated that there are lots of beneficial effects for our health. Research is constantly highlighting the important role that our gut bacteria play in our health. The bacteria in our digestive system outnumber our cells 10-1 and they weight 3 lbs - it makes sense that our health is intimately connected. The collective name for all the bacteria that live in our digestive system is microbiome and they are critical when it comes to our overall health and have a big role to play in diabetes and obesity too. Feed the bugs Feeding your microbiome (the good gut bacteria) – and the cells that line your intestines – seems to affect hormone levels in the body (GLP-1 etc.), which in turn has a positive effect on blood sugars and the body's sensitivity to insulin. Our ancestors had a diet rich in resistant starch, it is only as our diet has become more processed that resistant starch starting reducing in our diet. Resistant starch is the perfect food for your microbiome and the benefit for you is that they convert the starch into short chain fatty acids that help with bowel health and impact When the bacteria digest the resistant starch they produce a number of really important chemicals, one of which is called butyrate Butyrate is t Continue reading >>

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

There are many misconceptions that people with diabetes must follow a strict diet, when in reality they can eat anything a person without diabetes eats. Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a "Diabetic Diet," debunks some common food myths for people with diabetes. 1. People with diabetes have to eat different foods from the rest of the family. People with diabetes can eat the same foods as the rest of their family. Current nutrition guidelines for diabetes are very flexible and offer many choices, allowing people with diabetes to fit in favorite or special-occasion foods. Everyone, whether they have diabetes or not, should eat a healthful diet that consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein foods, and heart-healthy fats. So, if you have diabetes, there's no need to cook separately from your family. 2. People with diabetes should never give in to food cravings. Almost everyone has food cravings at some point, and people with diabetes are no exception. It's not uncommon for people with diabetes to cut out all sweets or even cut way back on food portions in order to lose weight. In turn, your body often responds to these drastic changes by creating cravings. Nine times out of ten, your food choices in these situations tend to be high in fat and/or sugar, too. The best way to deal with food cravings is to try to prevent them by following a healthy eating plan that lets you occasionally fit sweets into your diabetes meal plan. If a craving does occur, let yourself have a small taste of whatever it is you want. By doing so, you can enjoy the flavor and avoid overeating later on. 3. People with diabetes shouldn't eat too many starchy foods, even if they contain fiber, because starch raises your blo Continue reading >>

Why Starch Is A Major Obstacle With Diabetes

Why Starch Is A Major Obstacle With Diabetes

*Note: Starch contents listed above are estimates, as USDAs official database does not list starch specifically but can be estimated based on calculations by elimination of sugar and fibers. Starch has historically been a significant part of our diets as it provides a large amount of calories and is relatively inexpensive to produce. On top of this, many starchy foods taste great and tend to be very shelf stable compared with their non-starchy counterparts. Starch provides a thickened texture giving certain foods a viscosity that is difficult to replicate without it. And starches are often used in pudding, salad dressings, sauces, and pie fillings, as thickeners and stabilizers. When we eat cooked starch (the body is unable to digest raw starch well), therefore the long straight or branched compounds are broken down into individual glucose molecules. These glucose molecules are then absorbed through the small intestine into the bloodstream where they can be utilized to fuel cells. Or if the body has enough glucose stores, the excess will be stored as fat if there is sufficient insulin to process them and the cells are responsive to insulin. If not, as in the case of diabetes, the glucose stays in the bloodstream. Please pin, tweet or share this; then keep on reading. Resistant starch is digested differently to other starches. It passes through the small intestine undigested similar to soluble fiber. It makes its way to the colon where it is then fermented by microbes that produce byproducts called short chain fatty acids butyrate, acetate and propionate. These unique fatty acids feed healthy gut bacteria, along with playing important roles in lipid, glucose, and cholesterol metabolism. Very little energy is extracted from resistant starch, which results in minimal impa Continue reading >>

Starch Blocker :: Diabetes Education Online

Starch Blocker :: Diabetes Education Online

Starch blockers delay starch and sucrose absorption. This medicine primarily helps lower your after-meal blood sugars. Starch blockers lowers your blood sugar by delaying how quickly starch and carbohydrate (CHO) are absorbed from your intestines. Starch blockers inhibit the intestinal digestive enzyme, alpha glucosidase, which slows CHO absorption giving your body more time to handle all the CHO in your meal. This medicine primarily helps lower your after-meal blood sugars. Because it doesnt reduce the amount of CHO absorbed, the effect on lowering the A1c is quite mild. The medicine also is a blood sugar normalizing pill or euglycemic, (drugs that help return the blood sugar to the normal range.) The main side effect is flatulence (gas). To reduce this effect, the dose of this medicine should be increased slowly, and you should eat a similar amount of CHO day to day at your different meals. This medicine is rarely used because the reduction of A1c is modest, and most people dislike the side effect of gas. You shouldnt take these medications if you have intestinal, liver or kidney disease. In short, a starch blocker delays digestion and absorption of starch and sucrose. Continue reading >>

Advice On Sugar And Starch Is Urged In Type 2 Diabetes Counselling

Advice On Sugar And Starch Is Urged In Type 2 Diabetes Counselling

Advice on sugar and starch is urged in type 2 diabetes counselling Advice on sugar and starch is urged in type 2 diabetes counselling BMJ 2016; 355 doi: (Published 06 December 2016) Cite this as: BMJ 2016;355:i6543 GPs have been urged to help patients with type 2 diabetes make informed choices about their treatment, including advice that reducing their daily intake of sugar and starchy carbohydrate could reverse the disorder. I have spent 25 years failing patients with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar levels got worse as they got steadily heavierand nothing I could say or do made any difference, said David Unwin, a GP partner in Southport since 1986, who was recently appointed national champion for collaborative care and support planning in obesity and diabetes at the Royal College of General Practitioners. He was speaking at a meeting at the Kings Fund in London on 30 November. Continue reading >>

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