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Ssri Withdrawal Hypoglycemia

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  1. Guest_Clara Oswin_*

    Over the years, I've had at least 6 ambulance rides to the ER for syncope type events or non-epileptic seizures/severe hypertonicity.
    Twice it was because, even knowing exactly what could happen, I stopped taking xanax which I was prescribed (6 mg/day...to 0 overnight. SMART!) I also have had various hypokalemic episodes, severe sleep deprivation and hypoglycemic or dehydration symptoms that all share things in common with the rest.
    I'm sharing this in case anyone has had it happen, wants to share or simply to spread some awareness.
    I'd start out anxious, grumpier
    three days before, typically, the nightmares would start. Night time full on anxiety. Feeling a 'demonic/evil' presence in the room or having intrusive thoughts about horrible things happening. I even would ask my mother to sleeep with me and I'm 29 now.
    Slowly the twitches started. Tiny things, fasciculation and the like. Often at the corner of my eye or my thighs and arms. You could see the small areas contract, spasm.
    Movements got jerkier, palpitations
    It just got scarier. I'd hear disjointed voices/songs. I'd have visual phenomena since I can't think of it another way. Things always lurking in the corner of my eye.
    Startled so easily and ws getting paranoid
    W/ the xanax withdrwal by this point I'd have stated loo=sing cognitive ability and talking nonsense to my parents, head twitching, complaining of pain behind my eyes and then fall over. Memory blank until about a half hour before the LOC.
    The hypokalemia dn sleep dep (also dehydration/hypoglycemia) brought it to anothr level. I began disassociating. Derealization. Depersonalisation.
    I'd stop forming memories (anterograde amnesia) and start repeating the same action over and over and over.
    I felt like I was somewhere odd. I didn't know why I was there (home or my dorm, didn't matter). The worst time I ended up calling from the dorms crying like alittle girl "Mummy, tI don't know where I am. I'm scared. Something bad is going to happen. I'm so scared"
    In that case I wound up overnight in the ER getting potassium (its was due to a genetic issue + gastroparesis). Sleep deprivation, though small, had sped things along. When I was taken to an exam room they honestly tought I had suffered brain damage.
    I'm now mindful and pay attention to all this stuff so as not to have it all happen again. I'm sorry if anyone got freaked out. I wanted to share and maybe it could help someone.

  2. Guest_amaranth_*

    There should be a thread dedicated to experiences with medications. Thank you for posting this.
    I need to compile my (and others') experiences with SSRIs for reference.

  3. #3 Guest_Clara Oswin_*

    ἅπτω, on 17 Nov 2014 - 04:27 AM, said:
    There should be a thread dedicated to experiences with medications. Thank you for posting this.
    I need to compile my (and others') experiences with SSRIs for reference.
    Quoting for emphasis!

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Mao Inhibitors: The Forgotten Antidepressant That Saved My Life

A science writer recounts his longtime struggle with panic disorder, which led to an unusual solution I had my first panic attack in 1972 when I was 20 years old and a student at the University of London. It took me 10 years to be diagnosed and another 15 years to find a medication that would help me. The medication is Nardil (phenelzine) and it is a monoamine oxidase inhibitor or MAOI, the oldest antidepressant. The drug is rarely used anymore and most people, including young doctors and medical students, don't know much about it. If you've heard the term MAOI, it is probably in conjunction with an ad for a drug such as Prozac (fluoxetine) and the warning "don't take this drug if you are on an MAO inhibitor." Nardil has saved me from a life of fear, shame, loneliness and isolation. It allows me to write, have relationships, play tennis and travel – things I could not do when my panic attacks were at their worst. Hardly anyone takes MAO inhibitors anymore because they have dietary restrictions and interactions with other drugs and because of the popularity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, antidepressants which can also be effective treatments for panic disord Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Ellen042

    I'd love your input. I'm just in my second week of AD withdrawal (trazodone in my case), but something weird happened today. I got shakey on the inside. I assumed it was either the three! cups of coffee I had consumed in the morning or AD withdrawal, but when I ate a brownie after lunch, it stopped. Think the shakes may have been WD hypoglycemia. They haven't come back. If this is WD hypoglycemia, do I just stop eating sugar, or should I stop all carbs the best I can? I don't have to go get checked out by my doctor, do I? Hypoglycemia does run in my family. Thanks!

  2. Meimeiquest

    Wild guess...it is you more sensitive to blood sugar fluctuations than you used to be. I believe hypoglycemia comes in two forms...blood sugar drops abnormally to an abnormal level, or body reacts like blood sugar has dropped too low, when it's just dropped some. In other words, your body can raise the point where a decrease in blood sugar triggers a reaction. Good protein and healthy fat can help, as well as decreasing simple carbs like white flour and sugar. I think this is connected to the cortisol aspect of withdrawal.

  3. Altostrata

    I've had weird fluctuations in my ability to handle simple carbs and also bouts of low blood sugar which stabilized after a while.
    Suggest you go carefully, listen to your body and, overall, reduce your intake of both caffeine and sugar. Both can cause strange symptoms in hypersensitive people.

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What is MATERNAL DEATH? What does MATERNAL DEATH mean? MATERNAL DEATH meaning - MATERNAL DEATH definition - MATERNAL DEATH explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Maternal death is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the death of a woman while pregnant or within 42 days of termination of pregnancy, irrespective of the duration and site of the pregnancy, from any cause related to or aggravated by the pregnancy or its management but not from accidental or incidental causes." The world mortality rate has declined 45% since 1990, but still every day 800 women die from pregnancy or childbirth related causes. According to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) this is equivalent to "about one woman every two minutes and for every woman who dies, 20 or 30 encounter complications with serious or long-lasting consequences. Most of these deaths and injuries are entirely preventable." UNFPA estimated that 289,000 women died of pregnancy or childbirth related causes in 2013. These causes range from severe bleeding to obstructed labour, all of which have highly effective interventions. As women have gained access to family planning and skilled birth attendance with backup emergency obstetric care, the global maternal mortality ratio has fallen from 380 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in 1990 to 210 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2013, and many countries halved their maternal death rates in the last 10 years. Worldwide mortality rates have been decreasing in modern age. High rates still exist, particularly in impoverished communities with over 85% living in Africa and Southern Asia. The effect of a mother's death results in vulnerable families and their infants, if they survive childbirth, are more likely to die before reaching their second birthday. Factors that increase maternal death can be direct or indirect. Generally, there is a distinction between a direct maternal death that is the result of a complication of the pregnancy, delivery, or management of the two, and an indirect maternal death. that is a pregnancy-related death in a patient with a preexisting or newly developed health problem unrelated to pregnancy. Fatalities during but unrelated to a pregnancy are termed accidental, incidental, or nonobstetrical maternal deaths. The most common causes are postpartum bleeding (15%), complications from unsafe abortion (15%), hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (10%), postpartum infections (8%), and obstructed labour (6%). Other causes include blood clots (3%) and pre-existing conditions (28%). Indirect causes are malaria, anaemia, HIV/AIDS, and cardiovascular disease, all of which may complicate pregnancy or be aggravated by it. Sociodemographic factors such as age, access to resources and income level are significant indicators of maternal outcomes. Young mothers face higher risks of complications and death during pregnancy than older mothers, especially adolescents aged 15 years or younger. Adolescents have higher risks for postpartum hemorrhage, puerperal endometritis, operative vaginal delivery, episiotomy, low birth weight, preterm delivery, and small-for-gestational-age infants, all of which can lead to maternal death. Structural support and family support influences maternal outcomes. Furthermore, social disadvantage and social isolation adversely affects maternal health which can lead to increases in maternal death. Additionally, lack of access to skilled medical care during childbirth, the travel distance to the nearest clinic to receive proper care, number of prior births, barriers to accessing prenatal medical care and poor infrastructure all increase maternal deaths. Unsafe abortion is another major cause of maternal death. According to the World Health Organization, every eight minutes a woman dies from complications arising from unsafe abortions. Complications include hemorrhage, infection, sepsis and genital trauma. Globally, preventable deaths from improperly performed procedures constitute 13% of maternal mortality, and 25% or more in some countries where maternal mortality from other causes is relatively low, making unsafe abortion the leading single cause of maternal mortality worldwide.

Maternal Use Of Ssris And Neonatal Effects

Maternal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during or after pregnancy may result in adverse effects in newborn babies, due to a withdrawal effect following intra-uterine exposure, or a toxic effect from ingestion of an SSRI in breast-milk. The Australian Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee (ADRAC) has received 26 reports of neonates with symptoms attributed to withdrawal effects due to maternal third trimester ingestion of SSRIs (paroxetine 10, sertraline 7, fluoxetine 7, citalopram 2). The table below presents the most frequently reported reactions. Other reactions included convulsions, tremor, fever and respiratory disorders (respiratory depression, apnoea, tachypnoea). Two babies had marked extensor posturing with backarching. The usual day of onset, if reported, was the day of birth, but ranged from 0 to 4 days of age. The symptoms resolved in 2 - 3 days in most cases. Frequent neonatal symptoms reported in association with maternal SSRI ingestion Symptoms Withdrawal syndrome Breast-milk transfer Agitation/Jitteriness 15 4 Poor feeding 7 4 Hypotonia 7 1 Sleepiness/Lethargy 0 3 Gastrointestinal symptoms 3* 3 Total reports 26 13 * In one case the symptom Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Ellen042

    I'd love your input. I'm just in my second week of AD withdrawal (trazodone in my case), but something weird happened today. I got shakey on the inside. I assumed it was either the three! cups of coffee I had consumed in the morning or AD withdrawal, but when I ate a brownie after lunch, it stopped. Think the shakes may have been WD hypoglycemia. They haven't come back. If this is WD hypoglycemia, do I just stop eating sugar, or should I stop all carbs the best I can? I don't have to go get checked out by my doctor, do I? Hypoglycemia does run in my family. Thanks!

  2. Meimeiquest

    Wild guess...it is you more sensitive to blood sugar fluctuations than you used to be. I believe hypoglycemia comes in two forms...blood sugar drops abnormally to an abnormal level, or body reacts like blood sugar has dropped too low, when it's just dropped some. In other words, your body can raise the point where a decrease in blood sugar triggers a reaction. Good protein and healthy fat can help, as well as decreasing simple carbs like white flour and sugar. I think this is connected to the cortisol aspect of withdrawal.

  3. Altostrata

    I've had weird fluctuations in my ability to handle simple carbs and also bouts of low blood sugar which stabilized after a while.
    Suggest you go carefully, listen to your body and, overall, reduce your intake of both caffeine and sugar. Both can cause strange symptoms in hypersensitive people.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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