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Spaghetti Squash Blood Sugar

The Best Method For Cooking Spaghetti Squash

The Best Method For Cooking Spaghetti Squash

The Best Method for Cooking Spaghetti Squash Its spaghetti squash mania in my kitchen right now! As the weather warms up in Pennsylvania, Im loving thin strands of spaghetti squash as an alternative to heavy pasta dishes. And my gluten-free clients cant seem to get enough. While you may be hesitant to trade your traditional plate of spaghetti for squash, consider this: Unlike refined carbohydrates that leave you tired and bloated, spaghetti squash can actually help regulate your blood sugar. Maintaining even blood sugar levels is key to achieving a state of calm in your body and mind. Like other winter squash, spaghetti squash also contains phytonutrients and fiber, as well as vitamins and minerals (like vitamins A and C, manganese and folate). Its even said to help reduce inflammation, which is a common cause for headaches, joint pain, sinus infections and chronic illnesses. Needless to say, you can see why Im a fan. Cooking spaghetti squash may seem intimidating, but dont let the tough exterior fool you. It doesnt get easier than my 4-step technique. The trick? I save cutting for the endafter the squash is nice and tender. Genius, right? Poke a few holes in the skin using a paring knife. Place it on a baking sheet, and cook for about 45 minutes to an hour. If you can easily pierce through the skin with a knife, its done. Once you can touch the squash without burning your fingers, make a thin cut along one side of the skin. Rest the squash on the flat surface to stabilize it. Cut the squash in half lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds (and save for roasting). Use a fork to scrape the flesh into thin strands. Place in a large bowl or keep them in the shells for a fun presentation. Then, use your cooked noodles as you would regular pasta. Toss with olive oil, salt and fresh Continue reading >>

Glycemic Load

Glycemic Load

While the glycemic index (GI) serves as a good general guide for how foods affect blood sugar, it fails to take one aspect into consideration: amount. And that’s really important because it’s BOTH quality (the GI rating) and quantity (serving size) of carbohydrate that impacts blood sugar. Glycemic Load = Type of Carb + Amount of Carb While the glycemic index (GI) measures glycemic response after consuming a standard amount (50 grams) of carbohydrate from a particular food, the glycemic load (GL) ranks foods according to how much carbohydrate is in a regular serving of the food in question. And this is a really important consideration. Let’s put this into practice. Carrots have a high glycemic index of 68. But you would have to eat a bunch of carrots (literally!) to get to 50 grams of carbohydrate. And that’s pretty unlikely. (Glycemic Load of carrots is just 3) Pasta, on the other hand, has a relatively low glycemic index of 38. But 50-100 grams of carbohydrate are easy to reach in a single serving of spaghetti (especially if it’s a gigantic restaurant portion). (Glycemic Load of spaghetti is 14). Formula for Calculating Glycemic Load Here’s the formula for calculating Glycemic Load (GL): GL = (GI Value x Carbohydrate Per Serving) 100 Now you’re probably wondering – “What do these numbers mean?”… and “How can I ensure I’m eating a diet with a low glycemic load?” Glycemic Load: High, Medium & Low Just like the glycemic index, glycemic load is categoriezed as low, moderate and high. Low Glycemic Load = Less than 10 (has low glycemic impact) Moderate Glycemic Load = Between 10 and 20 (moderate effect on blood-sugar ) High Glycemic Load = Above 20 (spikes blood sugar levels) The Glycemic Load of Specific Foods Now let’s take a look at the glyc Continue reading >>

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

Forget what you've been tolda diabetes diagnosis does not mean you've been sentenced to a life without carbs. Well, doughnuts may be off the list, but the right carbs can and should be part of a balanced diet for everyone, explains Anna Taylor, RD, a registered dietitian at Cleveland Clinic. In fact, for those with (type 1 or 2) diabetes, getting enough good-for-you carbs is essential for keeping blood sugar levels under control. The key is to pick carb-containing foods that are also rich in fiber and/or protein, nutrients that actually slow the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates, resulting in a more gradual rise and fall of blood sugar levels. Here are Taylor's top 10 diabetes-friendly carb picks, all of which pack additional nutrients that can help prevent chronic conditions or diabetes complications down the line. Lentils and beans are excellent sources of protein and fiber. The 19 grams of carbs from a half cup serving of cooked lentils come with 9 grams of protein and 8 grams of fiber (3 grams per serving is considered a "good" source of fiber; 5 and up is considered an "excellent" source, per FDA guidelines). One thing to note: You get the same benefits from canned beans as you do from cooked, dried beansbut you may want to rinse them first, which can eliminate more than 40% of the sodium.(Diabetes doesn't have to be your fate; Rodale's new book, The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes , shows you exactly what to eat and do to prevent the diseaseand even reverse it.) Black-eyed, split, and classic green peas have protein and fiber benefits similar to those of beans and lentils. One cup of green peas (before cooking) packs 8 grams of protein, 7 grams of fiber, and 21 grams of carbohydrates. Bonus: They have more than 20% of your daily value of vitamin K, manganese Continue reading >>

6 Tips To Manage Type 2 Diabetes In 2011

6 Tips To Manage Type 2 Diabetes In 2011

Diabetes is prevalent in our society and so are carbohydrates. On numerous occasions Ive heard people say, I never met a carbohydrate I did not like. Lets face it, carbohydrates are easily accessible, usually inexpensive, tasty, they can be made into interesting and fancy concoctions, and sadly, they can be a addictive for some. One of my clients asked, how can someone who has type 2 diabetes be healthy, enjoy eating and feel full without breaking up with carbohydrates? Here are some tips to answer that question. Read labels or choose foods without labels If you pick up an apple or some green beans you wont find a label on them. Herein lies the clue that you are consuming a healthy unprocessed form of carbohydrates. Fruits and vegetables have built in fiber which slows the absorption of their sugar. This helps prevent the insulin spike and drop that is caused by eating refined carbohydrates. That spike and the subsequent drop in blood sugar levels is what causes a craving for more carbohydrates or food. If you do choose a carbohydrate with a label look at how many total carbohydrates are in a serving. The American Diabetes Association uses 15 grams of carbohydrate as one serving of carbohydrate, which is equal to a slice of bread. If you know this, you can look at how many total carbohydrates are in that particular food, and calculate how many slices of breads worth of carbohydrate you are consuming. For example, a typical container of juice can contain 2 servings and each serving could be 40 grams of carbohydrate. Since the container is 2 servings, drinking the entire container is 80 grams of carbohydrate or the equivalent of 5.3 slices of bread. Juice has no fiber so the result of consuming it will be a large spike in your blood sugar followed by a drop. And this is Continue reading >>

Why Spaghetti Squash And Zucchini Noodles Are Nutritionally Superior To Pasta And Taste Better Too

Why Spaghetti Squash And Zucchini Noodles Are Nutritionally Superior To Pasta And Taste Better Too

Why Spaghetti Squash and Zucchini Noodles are Nutritionally Superior to Pasta and Taste Better Too With the rise in Type 2 diabetes and the increase in popularity of diets low in carbs and dense in nutrients and protein, more people are looking for options to replace their beloved pasta without having to give up on flavor. Its not difficult to see why spaghetti squash and zucchini noodles are nutritionally superior to pasta and taste better, too. A 2-ounce serving or about one cup of cooked angel hair pasta contains around 200 calories, 1 gram of fat, 7 grams of protein and a whopping 42 grams of carbohydrates, and thats before adding any sauce. Compare that to one cup of spaghetti squash which is only 31 calories, 0.6 gram of fat, 1 gram of protein, and only 7 grams of carbohydrates so it's much lower on the glycemic index than pasta and won't raise your blood sugar levels, yet contains vitamins and minerals. Spaghetti squash can be used as a substitute in any dish that typically uses pasta and it's low in saturated fat, and very low in cholesterol. This vegetable is also a good source of niacin, Vitamin B6, pantothenic acid, potassium and manganese, and a very good source of dietary fiber and Vitamin C. Zucchini contains 33 calories, 0.2 gram of fat, 6 grams of carbohydrates and 2.4 grams of protein and is low in Saturated Fat and Sodium, and very low in Cholesterol. Zucchini is a good source of protein, Vitamin A, thiamin, niacin, phosphorus and copper, and a very good source of dietary fiber, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, riboflavin, Vitamin B6, folate, magnesium, potassium and manganese. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. and affects approximately 29.1 million Americans. Of those cases around 8.1 million cases are undiagnosed. Diabetes is a silent Continue reading >>

5 Reasons To Enjoy Spaghetti Squash Today

5 Reasons To Enjoy Spaghetti Squash Today

But all the Starbucks are dishing out their PSLs (Pumpkin Spice Lattes for the uninitiated) footballs on TV, and the leaves are beginning to change here and there. With fall comes an abundance of some incredibly tasty and nutritious foods. One of the healthiest is spaghetti squash. Spaghetti squash is an incredible fall food. And not just because its named after a dependable pasta noodle(is there such a thing as a dependable noodle)? Spaghetti squash is loaded with nutrients that will help you experience optimal health. 1. Its rich in carotenoids: There are over 600 carotenoids in the known world, and spaghetti squash is a rich source of quite a few of these valuable plant based nutrients. The spaghetti squashs pale yellow color represents its carotenoid content, (this is true of all plants and their different colors). First off its loaded in carotenoids known to prevent macular degeneration and strengthen the eyeswhich include lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-carotene. Both lutein and zeaxanthin have been shown to absorb harmful blue light and near-ultraviolet light to protect the eyes. Then theres beta-cryptoxanthin which is another powerful antioxidant. Research on beta-cryptoxanthin has revealed it can help to fight oxidative damage presented by free radicals in the body, which can ultimately help battle conditions like cancer, and other conditions related to inflammation. 2. It can help fight inflammation: Like many natural foods, spaghetti squash can help to battle the negative affects of inflammation. As The Worlds Healthiest foods writes In some of the more detailed studies, specific inflammation-related molecules, enzymes, or cell receptors (for example, nuclear factor kappa-B, nitric oxide synthase, or cyclo-oxygenase) have been studied as targets for the activit Continue reading >>

Calories In Spaghetti Squash And Its Health Benefits

Calories In Spaghetti Squash And Its Health Benefits

Unlike other winter squash varieties like butter and acorn, spaghetti squash does containsignificantly lower amounts of vitamin A. However, it is a good source of fiber, vitamin C, B-vitamins, manganese and potassium. Fiber is the indigestible part of carbohydrate that helps to keep you full , helps to regulate bowels and blood sugar, and can help to lower cholesterol. Studies have shown that people who eat fiber rich diets are at decreased risk for heart disease, certain cancers, and diabetes. Vitamin C, an important antioxidant and water soluble vitamin, aids in boosting immunity and assists in collagen making, granting it anti-aging properties. B-vitamins play an important role in carbohydrate, protein, and fat metabolism and manganese is a component of antioxidant enzymes. In addition, potassium can help to lower blood pressure. Lastly, spaghetti squash also contains lutein and zeaxanthin, which are antioxidants that protect your eyes from age-related diseases. Yes, you can. Scoop the seeds out and roast them for a nutritious snack. Squash seeds are rich in protein and magnesium . Choose spaghetti squash that is firm with no soft spots or blemishes. It should feel heavy for its size. Store spaghetti squash in a cool, dry place. Wash the skin before cutting. Once cooked, place spaghetti squash in the refrigerator in an airtight container to ensure freshness for up to a few days. Spaghetti squash must be steamed or baked before being able to pull away the crunchy, stringy flesh. The easiest way to do this is to bake your spaghetti squash face down in some water so that the flesh becomes steamed and soft.You also can bake the squash face up or use the microwave , but baking face down seems to lend the best product. While the oven is heating, rinse your spaghetti squas Continue reading >>

What Is Spaghetti Squash Good For?

What Is Spaghetti Squash Good For?

Spaghetti squash possesses an uncanny resemblance to spaghetti strands when cooked, and for this reason is known as vegetable spaghetti, noodle squash, vegetable marrow, and squaghetti. Spaghetti squash is a long, oblong vegetable that measures between 8 and 14 inches in length, weighs 2 to 3 pounds, and has flesh with a very pale yellow color. 1 It is a variety of the winter squash and has a mild taste similar to pasta. 2 This squash variety is often used as a healthful substitute for pasta due to its low carbohydrate levels. 3 Spaghetti squash originated in China. 4 In 1921, it was introduced to Japan by a Chinese agricultural research firm and was brought to the United States fifteen years later. It was commonly planted during World War II but only gained popularity in the late 20th century. Spaghetti squash can be added to a variety of dishes, such as soups and stews, or eaten raw. When served as spaghetti, it can be topped with a wide variety of pasta sauces. The best spaghetti squash possesses a deep yellow color. An unripe spaghetti squash will be marred with green marks and is best avoided. It can be stored at room temperature for several weeks. Spaghetti squash is also rich in the B vitamins riboflavin, niacin, and thiamin, which promote optimal cellular function. 5 Folate is also found in this bright-colored vegetable. Folate supports the formation and development of new cells and may help prevent birth defects, making this squash an ideal food for pregnant women. This nutrient can also help filter out homocysteine from your blood and promote cardiovascular health. Potassium , a mineral that maintains proper muscle and nerve function, is also present in spaghetti squash, making it helpful for people with high blood pressure. Manganese, a mineral that assists Continue reading >>

Surprising Spike From Spaghetti Squash

Surprising Spike From Spaghetti Squash

I had a healthy dinner last night that I assumed would be great for my glucose, but it wasn't. I went from 105 before the meal to 132 1.5 hours after. (that's a big spike for me.) Here's what I ate: approx 1 1/2 cups of spaghetti squash, 1/2 cup marinara sauce with 3 turkey meatballs and 1/2 cup of green beans. The sauce is from a jar but is low carb. The turkey meatballs have 1 gram of carb each. I just don't get why eating tons of veggies would spike me that much! Maybe I just ate too much? I'm just wondering if anyone else has had this happen when eating spaghetti squash. Sometimes it is hard to figure out exactly what in a meal caused a spike. It could have been the squash, sauce or the beans. I usually make my own sauce to avoid the added sugar in most jarred sauces. I do OK with most spaghetti squashes, winter squashes and zucchini. I notice your meal is fairly low fat, did you add any fat to the meal. I always use real organic butter with my Spaghetti squash. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. Sometimes it is hard to figure out exactly what in a meal caused a spike. It could have been the squash, sauce or the beans. I usually make my own sauce to avoid the added sugar in most jarred sauces. I do OK with most spaghetti squashes, winter squashes and zucchini. I notice your meal is fairly low fat, did you add any fat to the meal. I always use real organic butter with my Spaghetti squash. Good point about the fat, Jeanne. I' Continue reading >>

Spaghetti Squash With Turkey Marinara - Type2diabetes.net

Spaghetti Squash With Turkey Marinara - Type2diabetes.net

Carefully slice spaghetti squash in half lengthwise. Scoop out seeds from the middle of the squash. Fill a 13 x 9 inch glass pan with about 1/2 inch of water and place squash, cut side down in water. Bake at 375F for 30-40 minutes, until tender. Remove from oven and allow to cool. In a large saucepan, over medium-high heat, brown the ground turkey. When turkey is partially browned about 5-7 minutes, add in the sliced mushrooms. Continue cooking until meat is no longer pink and mushrooms are tender. Pour marinara sauce over the meat and mushrooms. Lower heat to medium and add in the broccoli florets. Cover pan and allow sauce to gently simmer. Once cooled enough to handle, remove spaghetti squash halves from pan. Using a fork, scrape out all of the tender yellow squash from inside and transfer to a bowl. When meat sauce is heated through and broccoli is tender, remove from heat. Serve spaghetti squash topped with meat sauce and fresh basil leaves. Tips/Notes: There are many types of premade marinara sauces in the grocery store. Spend some time reading labels and choose one no added sugar ( Sign up for emails from Type2Diabetes.com: Continue reading >>

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

One of my favorite foods is pasta. I think I could eat pasta every day and never tire of it. And when I’ve had a rough day, nothing comforts me as much as a plate of pasta with butter (or trans-fat-free margarine), Parmesan cheese, and freshly ground black pepper. Yet pasta is much maligned in the diabetes world. I’ve noticed that people who have diabetes become very passionate when discussing this food. There’s the camp that is indignant at the idea that pasta even exists — it spikes up blood glucose, causes weight gain, and may just be responsible for global warming (OK, that’s an exaggeration). There’s another camp who still eats pasta, but feels horribly guilty for doing so, and will swear with their right hand in the air that, “I really only ate a half a cup” (and 99% of the time, it’s just not the case). I don’t mean to trivialize the subject. Pasta can be tricky to fit into one’s diabetes eating plan. But not because it sends blood glucose levels to the moon. My belief (and you’re welcome to disagree with me) is that most of us struggle with portion control. It’s been engrained in us that pasta is a main dish: that it should be piled high on the plate and smothered in red sauce, with a crusty, buttery slice of garlic bread resting on the side. This is where the problems come in. Here’s what I mean. Take a look at the calories and carbs in the pasta meal that I just mentioned: 3 cups of pasta: 135 grams of carbohydrate, 663 calories 1 cup of sauce: 30 grams of carbohydrate, 185 calories 1 slice of garlic bread: 24 grams of carbohydrate, 170 calories Total: 189 grams of carbohydrate, 1,018 calories If you dine in an Italian restaurant and manage to clean your plate, you’ll consume even more carbohydrate and calories. When you look at p Continue reading >>

Why Not All Carbs Are Created Equal & A Simple Spaghetti Squash Recipe For You

Why Not All Carbs Are Created Equal & A Simple Spaghetti Squash Recipe For You

Happy Sunday! Today was glorious. The sun was out. People were outside. I made some intentional time to be outside. We were productive. We put an American Flag on our new house. I feel like it's complete now.I apologize for not having a recipe and/or some nutrition tidbits for you last week. I just simply didn't get around to it. But for tonight let's talk briefly about something called The Glycemic Index. I really didn't start thinking about glycemic index and blood sugar until a couple of months ago. I don't watch a lot of news, or TV in general, so maybe I'm missing something, but I don't thinkimportant nutrition info pertaining to blood sugar, the breakdown of carbs, and how it affects us, is talked about enough.However, I want you to experience a great life. I want you to feel great, look great, and take steps to get you closer to overall wellness,so I'm going to throw some info at you.And if you're like me, you like for people to be straight forward with you. I'm not trying to sound overly intelligent and use big words that go over your sweet, little head. So, hopefully the below info makes sense to you. Carbs aren't necessarily bad for you. They're essential for breaking down glucose in our bodies, which fuels everything from our brains to our muscles. Even veggies have carbs in them. However, not all carbs are created equal.Unfortunately most of the carbohydrates we eat tend to be highly processed. They have a high Glycemic Index.When digested, they are broken down waaaaayyyyy quickly,causing blood glucose to rise pretty high for ashort amount of time. Not good. The Glycemic Index is basically a comparison, or rankingofcarbohydrates in foods according to how they affect blood glucose levels.It does this byusing a scale from 0 to 100, where 100 is pure glucose. Continue reading >>

Recipes: Spaghetti Squash

Recipes: Spaghetti Squash

It’s hard to give up pasta. Many diabetics who don’t notice that their blood sugar levels spike too high when they eat pasta. What’s too high? In general, I’d say over 150 mg/dl (8.33 mmol/l) measured one hour after a meal, or over 130 mg/dl (7.22 mmol/l) two hours after the meal. Other experts disagree and propose other numbers. An alternative to spaghetti pasta that shouldn’t raise blood glucose levels as high is spaghetti squash. It’s all about the carbohydrates. A cup of cooked spaghetti squash has 10 g of carb; a cup of cooked spaghetti has 43 g. The fiber grams are about the same. Numbers are from FitDay.com. Spaghetti squash is a classic low-carb vegetable. If you’ve never tried it, you should. As vegetables go, it’s one of the largest, heaviest, and most interesting to prepare. Easy, too. The spaghetti squash season is autumn and winter in the northern hemisphere. Purchasing in spring and summer may be iffy. In my part of the world, supermarket spaghetti squashes weigh between two and five pounds. We cooked a three-pounder (1.4 kg) that yielded five cups; a five-pounder (2.3 kg) gave us 12 cups. A serving size is one, maybe two cups. What you don’t eat immediately stays fresh in the refrigerator for at least several days. Re-heat by microwaving or stir-frying. Like pasta and potatoes, the squash by itself is bland. It’s a great substrate for sauces or seasonings. Here’s how we cook it at the Parker Compound. Preheat the oven to 375º F 0r 190º C. Very carefully slice the squash in half lengthwise. Spoon out and discard the guts (seeds and membranes like a pumpkin; it even smells like a pumpkin). Put the halves flat-side down in a pan, then add a half inch (1.3 cm) of water to the pan. Cover with foil and bake until the outer shell (rind) i Continue reading >>

Sauteed Spinach And Tomatoes Over Roasted Spaghetti Squash

Sauteed Spinach And Tomatoes Over Roasted Spaghetti Squash

Sauteed Spinach and Tomatoes over Roasted Spaghetti Squash Sauteed Spinach and Tomatoes over Roasted Spaghetti Squash Spaghetti squash is a great option to satisfy cravings for pasta without sabotaging your health goals. This crunchy, pasta-like vegetable paired with spinach, tomatoes and pine nuts is a wonderful, comforting meal that is sure to please any crowd. Click here to view the PDF version. 1 large spaghetti squash, halved and seeded 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, divided sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste Brush each half of the squash with 1 teaspoon of the oil and season generously with salt and black pepper. Place the squash, cut sides down, on a baking sheet and roast for 30 to 40 minutes. The squash is cooked when a knife easily pierces through the skin and flesh. Remove from oven and let cool enough to handle, shred the flesh with a fork into spaghetti-like threads and set aside. Spread the pine nuts on a small baking sheet and place them in the oven to toast until golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes, checking often to prevent browning. Heat the remaining 2 teaspoons of oil in a large saute pan over medium heat. When the oil shimmers, add the garlic to the pan and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the tomatoes to the pan, season to taste with salt and black pepper and cook until the tomatoes begin to burst, 5 to 6 minutes. Add the spinach to the pan and season to taste with salt and black pepper. Cook, stirring until the spinach wilts, 3 to 4 minutes. Divide the spaghetti squash among 4 plates and top with the sauteed spinach and tomatoes. Sprinkle on the pine nuts and fresh basil. Serve immediately. Any leftovers can be covered in an air-tight container and refrigerated for up to 4 days. calories 254 fat 17 g saturated fat Continue reading >>

Spaghetti Squash: Tasty & Good For You

Spaghetti Squash: Tasty & Good For You

Written By: Pamela Ballard; In-House Nutritionist Spaghetti squash, also known as vegetable spaghetti, is a type of winter squash that, when cooked, separates into long pasta-like strands. All winter squash share a few common characteristics. The outer rinds are hard and difficult to pierce, enabling them to have long storage periods, from one week and six months. The flesh is mildly sweet to nutty in flavor and finely grained in texture. In general, this squash provides abundant phytonutrients that promote health. It contains beta-carotene, Vitamin A, and Vitamin C, which provide anti-inflammatory benefits and support the immune system. Other key nutrients include vitamin B6, dietary fiber, folate, magnesium, copper, and potassium. The combination of these nutrients makes this food an excellent part of a heart-healthy diet. These nutrients are also known for their role in cancer prevention and management of blood sugar levels. Spaghetti squash is at peak season from October to November. Choose a squash that is firm, heavy for its size and has a dull, not glossy, rind. Soft rinds may indicate that the squash is watery and lacking in flavor. Some tasty yet simple ways to prepare spaghetti squash include: Top with pasta sauce and Mediterranean herbs Prepare with eggs, onions and spinach for a savory breakfast Combine with tomatoes, avocado, cumin and cilantro for a Latin flavor Toss with low sodium Tamari, water chestnuts, carrots and bok choy for an oriental flavor Click here for delicious ways to prepare spaghetti squash Spaghetti squash is a great choice for incorporating a tasty, meatless meal into your weekly menu. Although it has a mild nutty flavor on its own, when you combine spaghetti squash with sauteed onions, olives, feta, and juicy tomatoes, it absorbs those Continue reading >>

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