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Somogyi Phenomenon Vs Dawn Phenomenon

Somogyi Phenomenon - Rebound Hyperglycemia

Somogyi Phenomenon - Rebound Hyperglycemia

Tweet The Somogyi phenomenon (also known as post-hypoglycemic hyperglycemia, chronic Somogyi rebound) describes a rebound high blood glucose level in response to low blood glucose. Amongst those people with diabetes who manage their blood glucose using insulin injections, this may take the form of high blood sugar in the morning due to an excess amount of insulin during the night. The Somogyi effect is controversial despite being widely reported. Why is rebound hyperglycemia called The Somogyi effect? The Somogyi phenomenon was named after a Hungarian-born professor called Dr. Michael Somogyi. He prepared the first insulin treatment given to a child with diabetes in the USA, and also showed that too much insulin would make diabetes management unstable and more difficult. Is Somogyi Phenomenon the same as Dawn Phenomenon? No, although they are often confused by healthcare professionals. The Dawn Effect (or Dawn Phenomenon) is a morning rise in blood sugar which occurs as a response to waning levels of insulin and a surge in growth hormones. How does Somogyi Phenomenon occur? Somogyi theorised that prolonged levels of untreated hypoglycemia could lead to stress (due to low blood sugar) and a high blood sugar levels rebound. This is a defensive response by the body as it released endocrine hormone glucagon, backed up by the stress hormones cortisol and epinephrine. This means an instant increase in blood glucose, and stress hormones cause insulin resistance for several hours, and this in turn leads to elevated blood sugar. How do I avoid Somogyi rebound? Somogyi phenomenom is avoidable in several ways. Firstly, intense blood glucose testing allows the individual experiencing Somogyi effect to detect and then prevent the circumstances leading to it. Testing blood sugar regu Continue reading >>

Dawn Phenomenon And The Somogyi Effect

Dawn Phenomenon And The Somogyi Effect

The dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect cause high blood sugar levels, especially in the morning before breakfast, in people who have diabetes. The dawn phenomenon is a normal rise in blood sugar as a person's body prepares to wake up. In the early morning hours, hormones (growth hormone, cortisol , and catecholamines) cause the liver to release large amounts of sugar into the bloodstream. For most people, the body produces insulin to control the rise in blood sugar. If the body doesn't produce enough insulin, blood sugar levels can rise. This may cause high blood sugar in the morning (before eating). If the blood sugar level drops too low in the early morning hours, hormones (such as growth hormone, cortisol, and catecholamines) are released. These help reverse the low blood sugar level but may lead to blood sugar levels that are higher than normal in the morning. An example of the Somogyi effect is: A person who takes insulin doesn't eat a regular bedtime snack, and the person's blood sugar level drops during the night. The person's body responds to the low blood sugar by releasing hormones that raise the blood sugar level. This may cause a high blood sugar level in the early morning. The Somogyi effect can occur any time you or your child has extra insulin in the body. To sort out whether an early morning high blood sugar level is caused by the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect, check blood sugar levels at bedtime, around 2 a.m. to 3 a.m., and at your normal wake-up time for several nights. A continuous glucose monitor could also be used throughout the night. If the blood sugar level is low at 2 a.m. to 3 a.m., suspect the Somogyi effect. If the blood sugar level is normal or high at 2 a.m. to 3 a.m., it's likely the dawn phenomenon. Continue reading >>

Dawn Phenomenon

Dawn Phenomenon

The dawn phenomenon, sometimes called the dawn effect, is an early-morning (usually between 2 a.m. and 8 a.m.) increase in blood sugar (glucose) relevant to people with diabetes.[1] It is different from chronic Somogyi rebound in that dawn phenomenon is not associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia. The dawn phenomenon can be managed in many patients by avoiding carbohydrate intake at bedtime, adjusting the dosage of medication or insulin, switching to a different medication, or by using an insulin pump to administer extra insulin during early-morning hours. In most of the cases, there is no need to change insulin dosing of patients who encounter the dawn phenomenon.[2] See also[edit] Cortisol awakening response [edit] External links[edit] Mayo Clinic - The 'dawn phenomenon': What causes it? Diabetes Self Management - Dawn Phenomenon Dawn Phenomenon (Liver Dump) Continue reading >>

Somogyi Phenomenon: Overview, Pathophysiology, Patient History

Somogyi Phenomenon: Overview, Pathophysiology, Patient History

Author: Michael Cooperman, MD; Chief Editor: George T Griffing, MD more... In the 1930s, Dr. Michael Somogyi speculated that hypoglycemia during the late evening induced by insulin could cause a counterregulatory hormone response (see the image below) that produces hyperglycemia in the early morning. [ 1 ] This phenomenon is actually less common than the dawn phenomenon, which is an abnormal early morning increase in the blood glucose level because of natural changes in hormone levels. [ 2 , 3 , 4 ] Debate continues in the scientific community as to the actual presence of this reaction to hypoglycemia. Shanik et al, for example, suggested that the hyperglycemia attributed to the Somogyi phenomenon actually is caused by an insulin-induced insulin resistance. [ 5 ] The causes of Somogyi phenomenon include excess or ill-timed insulin, missed meals or snacks, and inadvertent insulin administration. [ 6 , 7 , 8 ] Unrecognized posthypoglycemic hyperglycemia can lead to declining metabolic control and hypoglycemic complications. Although no data on frequency are available, Somogyi phenomenon is probably rare. It occurs in diabetes mellitus type 1 and is less common in diabetes mellitus type 2 . With proper identification and management, the prognosis for Somogyi phenomenon is excellent, and there is no evidence of long-term sequelae. Instruct patients in proper identification of symptoms of hypoglycemia, insulin dose, timing of meals, and insulin administration. For patient education information, see Insulin Reaction . The ability to suppress insulin release is an important physiologic response that people with insulin-requiring diabetes cannot carry out, as displayed in the image below. Defense against hypoglycemia involves counterregulatory hormones, which stimulate glucone Continue reading >>

What Is The Somogyi Effect?

What Is The Somogyi Effect?

When you use insulin therapy to control your diabetes, you need to measure your blood sugar levels several times a day. Depending on the results, you might take insulin to lower your blood sugar levels or have a snack to raise them. This sort of blood sugar troubleshooting can be thrown off when something like the Somogyi effect comes into play. Also known as the Somogyi phenomenon, the Somogyi effect happens when you take insulin before bed and wake up with high blood sugar levels. When insulin lowers your blood sugar too much, it can trigger a release of hormones that send your blood sugar levels into a rebound high. The Somogyi effect is rare. It’s more common in people with type 1 diabetes than type 2 diabetes. If you notice inconsistencies or large changes in your blood sugar levels, speak with your doctor. If you wake up with high blood sugar levels in the morning, and you don’t know why, you may be experiencing the Somogyi effect. Night sweats may be a symptom of this phenomenon. If you have diabetes, you may use insulin injections to manage your blood sugar levels. When you inject too much insulin, or you inject insulin and go to bed without eating enough, it lowers your blood sugar levels too much. This is called hypoglycemia. Your body responds to hypoglycemia by releasing hormones, such as glucagon and epinephrine. In turn, this raises your blood sugar levels. This is why the Somogyi effect is sometimes referred to as the “rebound effect.” Although the Somogyi effect is widely reported, there’s little scientific evidence to confirm its existence. Somogyi Effect vs. Dawn Phenomenon The dawn phenomenon is similar to the Somogyi effect, but the causes are different. Everyone experiences the dawn phenomenon to some extent. It’s your body’s natural r Continue reading >>

The Dawn Phenomenon – T2d 8

The Dawn Phenomenon – T2d 8

The occurrence of high blood sugars after a period of fasting is often puzzling to those not familiar with the Dawn Phenomenon. Why are blood sugars elevated if you haven’t eaten overnight? This effect is also seen during fasting, even during prolonged fasting. There are two main effects – the Somogyi Effect and the Dawn Phenomenon. Somogyi Effect The Somogyi effect is also called reactive hyperglycaemia and happens in type 2 diabetic patients. The blood sugar sometimes drops in reaction to the night time dose of medication. This low blood sugar is dangerous, and in response, the body tries to raise it. Since the patient is asleep, he/she does not feel the hypoglycaemic symptoms of shakiness or tremors or confusion. By the time the patient awakens, the sugar is elevated without a good explanation. The high blood sugar occurs in reaction to the preceding low. This can be diagnosed by checking the blood sugar at 2am or 3am. If it is very low, then this is diagnostic of the Somogy Effect. Dawn Phenomenon The Dawn Effect, sometimes also called the Dawn Phenomenon (DP) was first described about 30 years ago. It is estimated to occur in up to 75% of T2D patients although severity varies widely. It occurs both in those treated with insulin and those that are not. The circadian rhythm creates this DP. Just before awakening (around 4am), the body secretes higher levels of Growth Hormone, cortisol, glucagon and adrenalin. Together, these are called the counter-regulatory hormones. That is, they counter the blood sugar lowering effects of insulin, meaning that they raise blood sugars. The nocturnal surge of growth hormone is considered the primary cause of the DP. These normal circadian hormonal increases prepare our bodies for the day ahead. That is, glucagon tells the liver Continue reading >>

Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (high Morning Blood Sugar)

Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (high Morning Blood Sugar)

Are your fasting blood sugar levels often higher than when you went to bed? Is high fasting blood sugar with normal PP figures something to worry about? If you are worried about your glucose numbers swinging during sleep or pre-dawn hours, you could be experiencing the Dawn Phenomena. What Is The Dawn Phenomena? When we are asleep, our bodies are tasked with repair, maintenance and growth jobs. Since we are not eating anything during sleep, the body uses glucose from the liver to maintain metabolic functions. In addition to that, there is a surge in growth hormones in the early hours of the dawn between 4 am to 5 am, which makes the liver produce more glucose. Fact is; this is a natural occurrence and happens to all of us. In simpler words, everyone has the dawn phenomenon. The body produces hormones, including cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrine, to help maintain and restore cells within our bodies, and also give us the energy we need to start our day and make it until breakfast. In people who don’t have diabetes, the insulin produced by the body keeps these higher glucose levels in check. However, in diabetics who suffer from insulin resistance or have impaired insulin function, this leads to higher fasting blood sugar levels which normalize only post breakfast. For pregnant women, the dawn phenomenon is even more exaggerated due to additional hormones released in the night. The body has mechanisms to maintain normal basal glucose levels during sleep, so we don’t get hypoglycemia or low blood sugar at night. In patients displaying impaired glucose tolerance, their body is unable to handle the glucose surge at night combined with the insulin suppression. People who do strenuous exercise early in the morning (e.g. weight training) are also more likely to experience Continue reading >>

Dawn Phenomenon And Somogyi Effect In Iddm

Dawn Phenomenon And Somogyi Effect In Iddm

We examined the clinical relevance of a rise in fasting blood glucose (BG) between 0300 and 0600 in 97 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) receiving sequentially conventional (CT) and basal-bolus (BBIT) insulin therapies and assessed the impact of one potential causal factor, i.e., posthypoglycemic hyperglycemia, with 231 BG profiles (97 during CT, 134 during BBIT) in which BG was measured every 3 h over a 24-h period. A rise in BG between 0300 and 0600 occurred in 157 of 231 (68%) profiles. The mean magnitude of this rise was 56 ±39 mg/dl and was lower (P < .05) during BBIT (48 ± 35 mg/dl, n = 97) than CT (62±43 mg/dl, n = 97). A dawn rise (between 0300 and 0600) >50 mg/dl occurred in 40 of 97 (41%) profiles during CT and 26 of 97 (27%) during BBIT (P < .05). When all profiles were grouped according to the magnitude of this rise in BG, the mean daytime BG (from 0900 to 1800) was higher (P < .05) after an 0300–0600 BG rise >50 mg/dl compared with groups of profiles showing either a fall in BG or a rise <50 mg/dl; a rise in BG between 0300 and 0600 correlated (r = .38, P < .0001) with the subsequent mean daytime BG. Nocturnal hypoglycemia (BG <60 mg/dl) recorded at 2400 and/or 0300 occurred in 57 of 231 (25%) profiles. After nocturnal hypoglycemia, the highest BG recorded before breakfast was only 215 mg/dl, and the mean BG at 0600 was considerably lower (P < .0001) in profiles showing at least one episode of nocturnal hypoglycemia (116 ± 45 mg/dl, n = 57) compared with all profiles in which no nocturnal hypoglycemia was detected (174 ± 85 mg/dl, n = 174). In addition, postbreakfast BG levels at 0900 were lower (P < .0001) after nocturnal hypoglycemia (171 ± 87 mg/dl, n = 57) than when no nocturnal hypoglycemia was detected (211 ± 91 mg/dl, Continue reading >>

The Dawn Phenomenon And Somogyi Effect: What You Can Do

The Dawn Phenomenon And Somogyi Effect: What You Can Do

Waking up with a high blood sugar reading is not exactly the way you want to start off your day. Besides rushing to get ready for work or getting the kids off to school (or both), you now have to decide if and how you’ll deal with that reading on your meter. Maybe you decide to skip breakfast. If you take mealtime insulin, perhaps you inject a few extra units. Or you put in some additional time during your workout. Another option is to shrug it off and hope that your blood sugar comes down in a few hours. You might also ponder the reason your blood sugar is high. Could it be that you ate dinner later than usual last night? Or you ate too much carb at dinner? Or maybe it was your snack? While it’s normal to have high blood sugars when you have diabetes, it’s time to pay attention when the highs become the norm. Morning hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) is frustrating for many people; figuring out the cause is the first step in dealing with (and preventing) it. Dawn phenomenon: hormones that wreak havoc It’s easy to blame your morning high on the plate of pasta last night. But while that could certainly be a factor, chances are, your “highs” are a result of hormones. An imbalance of insulin, amylin (a hormone released by the pancreas), and incretins (hormones released by the gut) is the likely culprit. Other hormones get in on the act, too, including glucagon, growth hormone, cortisol, and adrenaline. Why? Overnight, the body gets this idea that it needs fuel (glucose). The witching hour seems to be around 3 AM or so. At this time, the liver and muscles obligingly respond to the signal for fuel and release glucose into the bloodstream. In someone without diabetes, insulin and its other hormone pals kick in to keep blood sugar levels on an even keel. In the case Continue reading >>

The Dawn Phenomenon: What Can You Do?

The Dawn Phenomenon: What Can You Do?

What is the dawn phenomenon that some people with diabetes experience? Can anything be done about it? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. The dawn phenomenon, also called the dawn effect, is the term used to describe an abnormal early-morning increase in blood sugar (glucose) — usually between 2 a.m. and 8 a.m. — in people with diabetes. Some researchers believe the natural overnight release of the so-called counter-regulatory hormones — including growth hormone, cortisol, glucagon and epinephrine — increases insulin resistance, causing blood sugar to rise. High morning blood sugar may also be caused by insufficient insulin the night before, insufficient anti-diabetic medication dosages or carbohydrate snack consumption at bedtime. If you have persistently elevated blood sugar in the morning, checking your blood sugar once during the night — around 2 a.m. or 3 a.m. — for several nights in a row will help you and your doctor determine if you have the dawn phenomenon or if there's another reason for an elevated morning blood sugar reading. What you can do Your doctor may recommend a number of options to help you prevent or correct high blood sugar levels in the morning: Avoid carbohydrates at bedtime. Adjust your dose of medication or insulin. Switch to a different medication. Change the time when you take your medication or insulin from dinnertime to bedtime. Use an insulin pump to administer extra insulin during early-morning hours. Continue reading >>

Somogyi Effect Vs. Dawn Phenomenon: The Difference Explained

Somogyi Effect Vs. Dawn Phenomenon: The Difference Explained

For people who have diabetes , the Somogyi effect and the dawn phenomenon both cause higher blood sugar levels in the morning. The dawn phenomenon happens naturally, but the Somogyi effect usually happens because of problems with your diabetes management routine. Your body uses a form of sugar called glucose as its main source of energy. A hormone called insulin , which your pancreas makes, helps your body move glucose from your bloodstream to your cells. While you sleep , your body doesnt need as much energy. But when youre about to wake up, it gets ready to burn more fuel. It tells your liver to start releasing more glucose into your blood . That should trigger your body to release more insulin to handle more blood sugar . If you have diabetes, your body doesnt make enough insulin to do that. That leaves too much sugar in your blood, a problem called hyperglycemia . High blood sugar can cause serious health problems, so if you have diabetes, youll need help to bring those levels down. Diet and exercise help, and so can medications like insulin. If you have diabetes, your body doesnt release more insulin to match the early-morning rise in blood sugar. Its called the dawn phenomenon, since it usually happens between 3 a.m. and 8 a.m. The dawn phenomenon happens to nearly everyone with diabetes. But there are a few ways to prevent it, including: Dont eat carbohydrates before you go to bed. Take insulin before bedtime instead of earlier in the evening. Ask your doctor about adjusting your dose of insulin or other diabetes medicines. Continue reading >>

Szkolenie Podyplomowe/postgraduate Education

Szkolenie Podyplomowe/postgraduate Education

Endokrynologia Polska/Polish Journal of Endocrinology Tom/Volume 62; Numer/Number 3/2011 ISSN 0423–104X The dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect — two phenomena of morning hyperglycaemia Zjawisko brzasku i efekt Somogyi — dwa zjawiska porannej hiperglikemii Malwina Rybicka, Robert Krysiak, Bogusław Okopień Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland Abstract Morning hyperglycaemia in diabetic subjects may be caused by the dawn phenomenon, or the Somogyi effect, or poor glycaemic control. The dawn phenomenon occurs when endogenous insulin secretion decreases or when the effect of the exogenous insulin administered to the patient the day before disappears, together with a physiological increase in insulin-antagonistic hormones. The Somogyi effect is present in the case of excessive amounts of exogenous insulin. The dawn phenomenon is more common than the Somogyi effect. To diagnose these phenomena, it is useful to measure plasma glucose levels for several nights between 3 a.m. and 5 a.m. or use a continuous glucose monitoring system. Although their treatment differs, the best way of preventing both the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect is an optimal diabetes control with insulin therapy. (Pol J Endocrinol 2011; 62 (3): 276–283) Key words: morning hyperglycaemia, dawn phenomenon, Somogyi effect Streszczenie Poranna hiperglikemia wśród pacjentów z cukrzycą może być spowodowana zjawiskiem brzasku, efektem Somogyi lub złą kontrolą glikemii. Zjawisko brzasku pojawia się, gdy zmniejsza się wydzielanie endogennej insuliny lub gdy skończy się działanie podanej pa- cjentowi egzogennej insuliny łącznie z fizjologiczny Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

There are two reasons why your blood sugar levels may be high in the morning – the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. The dawn phenomenon is the end result of a combination of natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle and can be explained as follows: Your body has little need for insulin between about midnight and about 3:00 a.m. (a time when your body is sleeping most soundly). Any insulin taken in the evening causes blood sugar levels to drop sharply during this time. Then, between 3:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., your body starts churning out stored glucose (sugar) to prepare for the upcoming day as well as releases hormones that reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin. All of these events happen as your bedtime insulin dose is also wearing off. These events, taken together, cause your body's blood sugar levels to rise in the morning (at "dawn"). A second cause of high blood sugar levels in the morning might be due to the Somogyi effect (named after the doctor who first wrote about it). This condition is also called "rebound hyperglycemia." Although the cascade of events and end result – high blood sugar levels in the morning – is the same as in the dawn phenomenon, the cause is more "man-made" (a result of poor diabetes management) in the Somogyi effect. There are two potential causes. In one scenario, your blood sugar may drop too low in the middle of the night and then your body releases hormones to raise the sugar levels. This could happen if you took too much insulin earlier or if you did not have enough of a bedtime snack. The other scenario is when your dose of long-acting insulin at bedtime is not enough and you wake up with a high morning blood sugar. How is it determined if the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is causing the high blood sug Continue reading >>

Somogyi Effect: Causes And Prevention

Somogyi Effect: Causes And Prevention

The Somogyi effect, also known as the rebound effect, occurs in people with diabetes. Hypoglycemia or low blood glucose in the late evening causes a rebound effect in the body, leading to hyperglycemia or high blood glucose in the early morning. This phenomenon, known as the Somogyi effect, is widely reported but remains controversial due to a lack of scientific evidence. It is reported more by people with type 1 diabetes than by people with type 2 diabetes. Contents of this article: What is the Somogyi effect? Named after Michael Somogyi, a Hungarian-born researcher who first described it, the Somogyi effect is the body's defensive response to prolonged periods of low blood sugar. A dose of insulin before bed that is too high can be a cause. When insulin reduces the amount of glucose in the blood by too much, it causes hypoglycemia. In turn, hypoglycemia makes the body stressed, triggering the release of the stress hormones epinephrine (adrenaline), cortisol, and growth hormone. The endocrine hormone glucagon is also released. Glucagon triggers the liver to convert stores of glycogen into glucose, which can send blood glucose levels into a rebound high. The stress hormones keep the blood glucose levels raised by making the cells less responsive to insulin. This is known as insulin resistance. Controversy The Somogyi effect is widely cited among doctors and people with diabetes, but there is little scientific evidence for the theory. For example, one small study found that hyperglycemia upon waking is likely to be caused by not enough insulin before bed. Researchers also found that participants who appeared to have rebound hyperglycemia did not have higher levels of growth hormone, cortisol, or glucagon than others. A 2007 study of 88 people with type 1 diabetes using c Continue reading >>

The Dawn Phenomenon And The Somogyi Effect - Two Phenomena Of Morning Hyperglycaemia.

The Dawn Phenomenon And The Somogyi Effect - Two Phenomena Of Morning Hyperglycaemia.

Abstract Morning hyperglycaemia in diabetic subjects may be caused by the dawn phenomenon, or the Somogyi effect, or poor glycaemic control. The dawn phenomenon occurs when endogenous insulin secretion decreases or when the effect of the exogenous insulin administered to the patient the day before disappears, together with a physiological increase in insulin-antagonistic hormones. The Somogyi effect is present in the case of excessive amounts of exogenous insulin. The dawn phenomenon is more common than the Somogyi effect. To diagnose these phenomena, it is useful to measure plasma glucose levels for several nights between 3 a.m. and 5 a.m. or use a continuous glucose monitoring system. Although their treatment differs, the best way of preventing both the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect is an optimal diabetes control with insulin therapy. Continue reading >>

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