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Somali Diabetes Education Materials

Research On Diabetes And Somali Families | Children's Minnesota

Research On Diabetes And Somali Families | Children's Minnesota

Collaborative research project at the University of Minnesota and Childrens Minnesota, to improve diabetes knowledge among Minnesota-Somali children and their families Minneapolis, Minnesota September 9, 2015 Researchers from the University of Minnesota and Childrens Minnesota are teaming up to develop new diabetes educational materials for Minnesota-Somali children and their families. Weve noticed that the Somali children were treating have worse type 1 diabetes control than their non-Somali counterparts. We believe that a potential contributing factor stems from a lack of culturally relevant education materials, said Muna Sunni, MBBCh , assistant professor of pediatric endocrinology in the University of Minnesota Medical School and physician at the University of Minnesota Masonic Childrens Hospital. Sunni and Jennifer Kyllo, M.D. , an endocrinologist at Childrens Minnesota, will develop new educational materials to address this issue through funding provided by the first Child Health Collaborative Grant Award , a $200,000 two-year grant funded by the University of Minnesotas Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) , the University of Minnesota Department of Pediatrics, and Childrens Minnesota. For years Childrens Minnesota and the University of Minnesota have been helping kids control diabetes and live a healthier life, saidRob Payne, M.D., medical director for research at Childrens Minnesota. But, in working with our community, we learned that there was room for improvement. This generous grant will help reduce the life-altering consequences of childhood diabetes. The researchers will work with parents of Somali children with type 1 diabetes to identify cultural gaps and barriers affecting care, such as mealtime customs, religious practices and food pref Continue reading >>

Diabetes Patient Education Materials

Diabetes Patient Education Materials

Ethnic Foods and Blood Sugar: Guides for Patients Cambodian Foods That Affect Blood Sugar: A Guide for Cambodian Patients This presentation is intended to be used by clinicians during discussion with patients about carbohydrates and blood glucose. It is culturally tailored to reflect foods commonly consumed by Cambodian Americans. Authored by Julianne Williams. For more information about how it was developed, click here, and select 'view documentation'. The narrated file may take a few moments to load. Scroll-over video for table of contents. How Foods Affect Blood Sugar: A Guide for Ethiopian and Eritrean Patients with Diabetes This presentation is intended to be used by clinicians during discussion with patients about carbohydrates and blood glucose. It is culturally tailored to reflect foods commonly consumed by Ethiopian and Eritrean Americans and includes photos of foods, meal comparisons, portion sizes, and some information about managing diabetes during periods of fasting. Authored by Mei Yook Woo. For more information about how it was developed, click here, and select 'view documentation'. How Foods Affect Blood Sugar: A Guide for Iraqi and Syrian Patients with Diabetes This education is intended to be used by clinicians during discussion with patients about carbohydrates and blood glucose. It is tailored to reflect foods commonly consumed by Iraqi and Syrian Americans and includes photos of foods, meal comparisons, portion sizes, and some information about managing diabetes during periods of fasting. Authored by Toi Sennhauser. For more information about how it was developed, click here, and select 'view documentation'. How Foods Affect Blood Sugar: A Guide for Latino Patients with Diabetes This bilingual presentation is intended to be used by clinicians during Continue reading >>

Consumer Health Information In Many Languages Resources

Consumer Health Information In Many Languages Resources

Consumer Health Information in Many Languages Resources A collaboration of the NNLM Consumer Outreach Librarians Resources with Items in Multiple Languages Cancer Resources: Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish and Others. Cultural Competency Resources and Patient Education Materials for: Amharic, Cambodian, Chinese, Eritrean, Ethiopian, Oromo, Somali, Spanish, Tigrean, Vietnamese and others. Multilingual information for health professionals, refugees and asylees (in print, audio and video formats). Use the drop-down box to choose a language - Chinese Simplified and Traditional, French, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Somali, Spanish, Ukrainian, Hindi, Vietnamese, and Arabic From Australia, this database contains links to government, hospital, community health center and other agency online multilingual resources in numerous languages. Provides audio, written and multimedia versions of resources in English, Spanish, Vietnamese, Arabic, Somali, Bosnian, Russian, Hmong, and Khmer. From Australia, this website provides HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C information in the following languages: Amharic, Arabic, Bosnian, Burmese, Chinese, Croatian, English, Indonesian, Italian, Khmer, Portuguese, Serbian, Somali, Spanish, Tagalog, Thai, Turkish, and Vietnamese. Immunization Action Coalition -- Print Materials in Other Languages Vaccine Information Sheets, produced by the Center for Disease Control, are available in over 30 languages. Breastfeeding information in 12 languages. Mass General Hospital's Point to Talk Booklets Continue reading >>

Collaborative Research Project To Improve Diabetes Knowledge Among Minnesota-somali Children And Their Families

Collaborative Research Project To Improve Diabetes Knowledge Among Minnesota-somali Children And Their Families

Collaborative research project to improve diabetes knowledge among Minnesota-Somali children and their families Collaborative research project to improve diabetes knowledge among Minnesota-Somali children and their families Researchers from the University of Minnesota and Childrens Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota are teaming up to develop new diabetes educational materialsfor Minnesota-Somali children and their families. Weve noticed that the Somali children were treating have worse type 1 diabetes control than their non-Somali counterparts. We believe that a potential contributing factor stems from a lack of culturally relevant education materials, said Muna Sunni, MBBCh , assistant professor of pediatric endocrinology in the University of Minnesota Medical School and physician at the University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital. Sunni and Jennifer Kyllo, M.D. , an endocrinologist at Childrens Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, will develop new educational materials to address this issue through funding provided by the first Child Health Collaborative Grant Award , a $200,000 two-year grant funded by the University of Minnesotas Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) , the University of Minnesota Department of Pediatrics, and Childrens Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota. For years Childrens Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and the University of Minnesota have been helping kids control diabetes and live a healthier life, said Rob Payne, M.D. , medical director for research at Childrens Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota. But, in working with our community, we learned that there was room for improvement. This generous grant will help reduce the life-altering consequences of childhood diabetes. The researchers will work with parents of Somali ch Continue reading >>

Resources For Aanhpis

Resources For Aanhpis

Control Your Portions (Korean) provides unique way to remembering food portions. Two Reasons I Find Time to Prevent Diabetes: My Future and Theirs Tip Sheet is available in 15 different languages. Order or download from NDEP to learn how to prevent diabetes. 4 Steps to Managing your Diabetes For Life is available in 15 different languages.Order or download from NDEPto learn more about how to live with diabetes. Association of Asian and Pacific Community Health Organizations (AAPCHO) The BALANCE Program (Building Awareness Locally and Nationally through Community Empowerment) provides technical assistance to increase awareness of diabetes in Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. Joslin Diabetes Center's Asian Americans Diabetes Initiative Joslin Diabetes Center's Asian American Diabetes Initiative Web site offers interactive tools dedicated to improving diabetes awareness and management for Asian Americans. The American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin Asian Indian Guide to Health, Nutrition and Diabetes provides nutrition information for Asian Indians, compiled by dietitians Seattle and King County REACH Coalition Diabetes Meal Planning and Healthy Recipes provides tools available in Cambodian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Samoan, Somali, Tagalog and Vietnamese. SPIRAL (Selected Patient Information Resources in Asian Languages) offersdetailed health information in Chinese, Hmong, Khmer, Korean, Laotian, Thai and Vietnamese. The National Library of Medicine has more information about diabetes, health and well-being of Asian Americans in the United States. Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Somali Community

Diabetes In The Somali Community

home Children's health Research Diabetes in the Somali community Type 1 diabetes affects kids of allethnicities, but appears to be moreprevalent in Somali children. MunaSunni, M.B.B.C.h., U pediatrics facultymember, is teaming up with JenniferKyllo, M.D., fromChildrens Hospitalsand Clinics of Minnesota to createeducational materials for Somali youthwith diabetes, thanks to Masonicsupport. In one example, because counting carbohydrates is a necessary skill for diabetes management,Sunni and Kyllo are creating a picture-based dietary resourceto help Somali familiesestimatethe carbohydrates in commonly-consumed Somali foods.By using images, this tool bypasses any literacy or linguistic barriers that might exist andserves as a relevant and practical resource. Although the short-term goal for these toolsis toeducate Somalis in Minnesota about diabetes, this work could eventually benefitSomalis nationally and even internationally. Currently, Sunni and Kyllo are gathering input from local Somali families to inform thedevelopment of their resources. Ultimately, their program will include: Collaborations with parents of Somali children with diabetes to identify barriersthat affect care and design methods that bridge linguistic and cultural gaps indiabetes education. Educational materials in Somali, including videos, to benefit affected familiesregardless of their literacy status. Group discussions that enable affected families to share experiences and advicewith one another. For local media coverage of this study, click here . Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Literacy Among Somali Patients With Diabetes Mellitus In A Us Primary Care Setting

Diabetes Health Literacy Among Somali Patients With Diabetes Mellitus In A Us Primary Care Setting

Diabetes Health Literacy Among Somali Patients With Diabetes Mellitus in a US Primary Care Setting Jane W. Njeru , MB, ChB, Misbil F. Hagi Salaad , RN, Habibo Haji , RN, Stephen S. Cha , MPH, and Mark L. Wieland , MD, MPH Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine (Drs Njeru and Wieland, Department of Nursing (Ms Hagi Salaad and Ms Haji), and Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics (Mr Cha), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Corresponding Author: Jane W. Njeru, MB, ChB, Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 [email protected] ). Phone: 507-284-5161; Fax: 507- 284-5073 The prevalence of diabetes mellitus among immigrants and refugees to the United States is initially lower than that of the general population, but with increasing duration of residence, prevalence rises dramatically ( 1 , 2 ). Persons from Somalia constitute one of the largest proportions of African-born US immigrants for the past 2 decades. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus among Somali immigrants is not known, but a study of 72 Somali psychiatric patients showed an increased prevalence of diabetes (24%) among this group compared with non-Somali controls ( 3 ). Among Somali immigrants with diabetes, measures of disease control are suboptimal when compared with non-Somali patients, suggesting an increased risk of complications ( 4 , 5 ). Reasons for these findings have not been explored, but in the general population, correlates of diabetes management include socioeconomic position, adherence to clinic visits, ethnicity, and diabetes literacy ( 6 - 9 ). Diabetes literacy is defined as the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropria Continue reading >>

Culturally Relevant Tools Needed To Improve Diabetes Care In Immigrant Communities

Culturally Relevant Tools Needed To Improve Diabetes Care In Immigrant Communities

Culturally relevant tools needed to improve diabetes care in immigrant communities In this issue, Susan Weiner, MS, RDN, CDE, CDN, talks with Carol Brunzell, RDN, LD, CDE, about developing a picture-based carbohydrate-counting resource for people with type 1 diabetes in a Somali community in the United States. Brunzell is an expert on providing specialized medical nutrition therapy to adult and pediatric patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, cystic fibrosis- related diabetes, diabetes in pregnancy and diabetes with celiac disease and other comorbidities. She has traveled with her pediatric diabetes endocrine team to East Africa for the past several years teaching diabetes management to health care professionals and working with children with type 1 diabetes in clinics. Brunzell: I work with both children and adults with type 1 diabetes as a dietitian and diabetes educator. In the pediatric side of my job, I work with a team of endocrinologists and nurse diabetes educators. Over the years, we have seen increasing numbers of Somali pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes as the immigrant population has grown. Minnesota has approximately 38,500 Somali residents and is home to the largest Somali population in the United States. In one study, type 1 diabetes prevalence was estimated at about 1 in 400 Somali children and adolescents. Similarly, in Finland, which is also home to a large Somali immigrant population, investigators found that the incidence of type 1 diabetes in Somali children is similar to that of the general pediatric population in Finland. Control of diabetes has been noted to be poorer in Somali youths compared to non-Somali youths with type 1 diabetes attending the same clinics. Our University of Minnesota Health pediatric diabetes team embarked on this Continue reading >>

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