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Snacks For Diabetics And Heart Patients

What To Eat With Heart Disease And Diabetes

What To Eat With Heart Disease And Diabetes

Q: I recently had open-heart surgery. My type 2 diabetes caused my heart disease. In the hospital, I was told to concentrate on eating to control my diabetes and my heart problems. With diabetes and heart disease, what can I eat? A: It's good to know your diabetes meal plan also benefits your heart. General nutrition recommendations for diabetes management include controlling portion sizes, limiting consumption of saturated and trans fats and cholesterol, and setting reasonable goals for your total amount of carbohydrates. These smart eating steps can help you achieve a more healthful body weight, as well as help control blood glucose and cholesterol levels -- all good for heart health. You may not have retained all of the information you were given at the hospital. The effect of pain medications and being overwhelmed with postoperative recovery often limits what a person can remember during this time. For this reason, seek an outpatient consultation with a dietitian who is also a certified diabetes educator. The dietitian can help you come up with a meal plan that fits your preferences and lifestyle. You may be pleasantly surprised that you can still enjoy most of your favorite foods in moderation. Virginia Zamudio Lange, a member of Diabetic Living's editorial advisory board, is a founding partner of Alamo Diabetes Team, LLP in San Antonio. Continue reading >>

6 Unexpected Heart-healthy Snacks

6 Unexpected Heart-healthy Snacks

My husband was first told he had high cholesterol at 30 and since then hes become acutely conscious of his heart healthparticularly which foods are heart-healthy. I thought for sure when I pulled together a list of surprising foods that promote heart health , hed look at me and say, Duh! Instead he surprised me by raising his eyebrows and smiling (probably because he could now add more foods to his good for your heart list). Find 10 recipes for brownies and more heart-healthy comfort foods here . Here are 6 on-the-go snacks that can, surprisingly, help your heart. Fortunately these foods are common items that we often have in our refrigerator and pantry. Popcorn: Popcorn delivers polyphenolsantioxidants linked to improving heart health. Gram for gram, popcorn boasts three times more polyphenols than kidney beans (the highest vegetable polyphenol source) and four times more than cranberries (the best fruit source), according to recent research out of the University of Scranton. Get a yummy, super-easy recipe for Cheesy Popcorn here . Whats more, popcorn is a whole grainand people who eat plenty of whole grains tend to be leaner and have a lower risk of heart disease than those who dont. Dark Chocolate: Researchers have discovered that eating moderate amounts of flavanol-rich dark chocolate has a blood-thinning effect, which can benefit cardiovascular health, and it may also boost the immune system by reducing inflammation. Some research also suggests cocoa may help lower blood pressure. Find a recipe for heart-healthy French Silk Pie and more chocolate recipes here . It appears that a compound in cocoa, called epicatechin, boosts nitric oxide, a substance that has been shown to be crucial to healthy blood vessels. (Plentiful levels of nitric oxide help keep blood pressu Continue reading >>

Heart-healthy Foods To Include In Your Diabetes Diet

Heart-healthy Foods To Include In Your Diabetes Diet

Heart-Healthy Foods to Include in Your Diabetes Diet Eating well is an important part of living with diabetes and including heart-healthy foods can help further boost your health. Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Although diabetes is known for affecting your blood sugar, the condition actually affects your whole body including your heart. In fact, people with diabetes are almost twice as likely to die from a heart attack or stroke as people who dont have diabetes, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. High blood sugars damage nerves and blood vessels throughout the body, says Megan Porter, RD, CDE , a dietitian and certified diabetes educator in Portland, Oregon. When these become damaged, they are unable to perform their normal functions. This can lead to heart-related problems such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and heart disease . The good news is that because diabetes and heart health are so closely linked, there are many steps you can take to help improve both health conditions. In addition to monitoring your diabetes, taking any prescribed medications for diabetes and heart issues, and getting regular exercise, eating a healthy diet can help you manage your diabetes and your heart health. A Well-Balanced Diet for Diabetes and Heart Health While theres no specific diet for people with diabetes, an overall balanced diet similar to the Mediterranean diet can help you keep your blood sugar within a healthy range. In fact, in a study published in 2013 in the New England Journal of Medicine , researchers found that when people at high risk for heart disease including some with diabetes followed a Mediterranean diet, their risk of stroke or cardiova Continue reading >>

What Foods Should I Eat For Heart Healthy Diet?

What Foods Should I Eat For Heart Healthy Diet?

To reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, have an egg with mushrooms for breakfast, and snack on pecans. What foods may elicit better health? Mushrooms, eggs, pecans, and plant sterols (found in plants, but more commonly found as a margarine spread).1-4 But first some perspective: "It's important to keep in mind if you want to improve your diet to substitute rather than add," says Alice Lichtenstein, DSc, Gershoff Professor of Nutrition Science and Policy and director and senior scientist at the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at Tufts University in Boston. She was not involved in the studies but reviewed them for EndocrineWeb. What Can We Learn from These Food Studies? Eggs Are Actually Good for our Heart and Overall Health Reinforced by the results of this study,1 and supported by a growing body of evidence,5,6 eggs not only do not boost blood cholesterol as has been thought for decades, rather eating eggs seems to improve blood glucose as well as lead to increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL, the type of cholesterol known to clog arteries), and increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL, the blood cholesterol that protects against cardiovascular disease.) One large egg a day actually appears to reduce the risk of diabetes without driving up your serum cholesterol,1 says Shirin Pourafshar, PhD, a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellow in nephrology at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. She randomly assigned 42 adults, ages 40 to 75 years, who had either prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, to eat one large egg a day or an equivalent amount of egg substitute for 12 weeks. Blood samples were analyzed for changes in levels of blood cholesterol and blood glucose.1At the end of the three months, the group eating eggs had a 4.4% reduction in blood glu Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Foods You Eat

Diabetes And The Foods You Eat

The foods you eat are made of 3 basic nutrients: carbohydrates, fat, and protein. All of these nutrients provide calories (energy) that allow your body cells to function properly. Why do I need a meal plan? A balanced meal plan is important for everyone. If you have diabetes, eating properly balanced meals and snacks is even more important. Food is an important tool that you can use to control diabetes and stay healthy. Carbohydrate counting adds variety to your meals and still allows you to control your blood glucose. Ask a registered dietitian how carbohydrate counting can be incorporated into your lifestyle. Eating a balanced meal plan can help you: Control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Control blood pressure. Maintain a healthy weight or reduce your weight, if you are overweight. Prevent low blood glucose reactions. Reduce the risk of health problems caused by diabetes. How do I get a meal plan? To plan the amount of foods that you eat, you should meet with a registered dietitian who will help you develop a meal plan that is right for you. This plan will be based on your individual health goals. Do I have to count every bite? No. But you will need to be aware of what and how much you are eating and the right portions of foods. The number one goal of the meal plan is to control blood glucose levels with an even distribution of carbohydrates at meals and snacks. Here are some basic guidelines: Follow the meal plan set with your dietitian. Eat a variety of foods every day to get all the nutrients you need. Eat only the amount of food in your meal plan. Eat about the same amount of food each day. Be aware of portion sizes. Do not skip meals. Eat meals and snacks at regular times every day. Distribute meals 4 to 5 hours apart, with snacks in between. If you are taking a Continue reading >>

Eating For A Healthy Heart, Diabetes Prevention, And A Healthy Weight

Eating For A Healthy Heart, Diabetes Prevention, And A Healthy Weight

Daily Recommendations The percentages, called Daily Values, do not provide accurate information for children. They are the percentage met of these nutrients but are based on higher calorie diets. Concentrate on calories, fat, sodium, fiber, and cholesterol. Nutrient Recommended Amount Total Fat < 50 grams Saturated Fat < 12 grams Trans Fat Minimize as much as possible Sodium < 2000 milligrams Fiber 25-30 grams Cholesterol < 200 milligrams The Basics Enjoy your food but eat smaller portions Increase vegetables and fruits – no limits on fruits and vegetables Eliminate sugar-sweetened beverages. This includes regular soda, juice (even 100% fruit juice), and chocolate, strawberry, or flavored milk It is ok and good for kids to get hungry between meals Do not keep junk food in the home Dietary changes should include the entire family No single food provides all of the nutrients we need, so it is important to eat a wide variety of foods Fruits and Vegetables Eating fruits and vegetables each day is important for long-term health since they contain nutrients that most other food groups don’t have. These nutrients, including antioxidants and phytonutrients, fight against diabetes and heart disease every day. If there is a shortage of these nutrients in the body due to a poor intake of fruits and vegetables, then the body won’t be equipped to fight against these chronic diseases that are threatening the body, even at a young age. Aim for 5 or more servings every day! Shop Smart: Buy fresh fruits and vegetables that are in season Go to your local Farmers Market Canned and frozen vegetables and fruits can be less expensive and just as healthy. Look for options that have “no added salt” Prepare and freeze vegetable soups/stews in advance Use frozen produce or over-ripe pr Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Diet | American Heart Association

The Diabetic Diet | American Heart Association

If youre a person with diabetes, you may juggle a lot of concerns. Eating a healthy diet is a big part of the balancing act. Unmanaged diabetes can increase your risk of developing heart disease . Diabetic patients are also at risk for blindness, amputation and kidney failure. Find out more about why treating diabetes matters . It's critical that people with diabetes pay attention to their heart health, said registered dietitian Kathy McManus, director of nutrition at Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston. They should combine a healthy complex carbohydrate with some protein and a littlebit of healthy fat for meals and snacks. They should also avoid trans fats and limit saturated fats. Know your fats . When grocery shopping, plan ahead for the week and always bring a list and a full stomach. Stay on the perimeter of the store, and stock up on seasonal produce thats on sale, McManus said. Not everything has to be fresh.Plain, frozen vegetables and fruits can beeasy and convenient substitutes. Look for whole-grain, high-fiber foods and limit your time on the aisles where there are boxed foods that may not be healthy. Take a close look at serving size and salt and sugar content. We all need to be sensitive to the added sodium and added sugar in packaged, processed, take-out foods and the Salty Six , McManus said. Avoid products with too much sugar and look for its other names in the ingredient list such assucrose, honey and high fructose corn syrup. Be wary of buy-one get-one free deals, because if theyre not healthy, youre getting more than you bargained for. Ready for dinner? Your best bet is to start with a small plate. Fill half of it with vegetables such as roasted squash, grilled asparagus or a salad. For the next quarter, consider a healthy carb like a small, plain Continue reading >>

20 Heart Healthy Snacks For Any Occasion

20 Heart Healthy Snacks For Any Occasion

Most of us get hungry between meals, and it can be very easy to make an otherwise 'healthy' diet 'unhealthy' by simply making a few poor choices in the snack department. Snacking between meals isn't necessary a bad thing, in fact healthy snacking can help prevent binge eating later in the day, and can be a valuable source of nutrients in your diet - but only if you're making the right choices The best snack options would be foods that offer a complex carbohydrate and a source of protein to keep you feeling sustained throughout the day. To keep your heart healthy choose snacks that are high in fiber to help lower cholesterol levels, and try to go for foods that contain mostly monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats, rather than saturated or trans fats. Fresh fruits or vegetables should be your snack of choice most of the time, as these will provide you with the nutrients and antioxidants you need to help fight heart disease. Many people use 100-calorie snack packs, such as crackers, cookies, or potato chips. While these are convenient items, and are a great way to control calories and portion size, they are not your best choice if you're trying to eat a heart healthy diet. Here are 20 heart healthy snack suggestions for you to try: #1 Small handful of unsalted nuts, such as almonds, hazelnuts or Brazil nuts. #2 Rye crisp bread with cottage cheese, sliced cucumber and a pinch of garam masala. #3 Small serve of tuna mixed with natural yoghurt and herbs, spread onto celery sticks. #4 Multigrain crackers topped with cheddar cheese and sliced green grapes. #5 Small serving of natural yoghurt mixed with pumpkin, sesame, and sunflower seeds, and a pinch of cinnamon for extra flavour. #6 Apple slices, spread with peanut butter and a sprinkling of raisins. #7 Wholegrain crisp br Continue reading >>

Cardiac And Diabetic Meal Plans

Cardiac And Diabetic Meal Plans

If you have diabetes, you are twice as likely to have a heart attack or stroke than someone who does not, according to the American Diabetes Association. Eating right not only helps you manage your blood sugar but also helps lower cholesterol and blood pressure. A cardiac and diabetic diet encourages you to eat more fresh, whole foods and less saturated fat and sodium. Consult a doctor before making any dietary changes. Video of the Day A cardiac and diabetic meal plan incorporates the diet basics for both diabetes and heart health. That means continuing to control your carb intake by eating the same amount of carbs at each meal as determined by your dietitian or doctor to manage blood sugar. If you don't know your meal carb needs, the ADA suggests starting at 45 to 60 grams. In addition, to improve heart health, eat more nutrient-rich foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, poultry, fish and nuts, while limiting foods high in calories and sodium that offer very little nutrition, such as soda, cake and fast food. Limit sodium to less than 2,300 milligrams a day, or 1,500 milligrams if you have high blood pressure. What to Eat for Breakfast Make whole grains a priority at breakfast. Whole grains, as well as fruits and vegetables, are a good source of fiber, and getting more fiber in your diet helps with blood sugar control and lowers your risk of heart disease. A heart-healthy diabetic breakfast might include 1/2 cup of cooked oatmeal topped with a small banana and served with a 6-ounce container of sugar-free yogurt. Or try a toasted whole-wheat English muffin topped with 2 teaspoons of peanut butter and an apple. Keeping It Heart-Healthy at Lunch The American Heart Association recommends you eat at least two servings of fish a week. The omega-3 f Continue reading >>

22 Heart Healthy Foods To Fuel Your Cardiac Diet

22 Heart Healthy Foods To Fuel Your Cardiac Diet

22 Heart Healthy Foods to Fuel Your Cardiac Diet 22 Heart Healthy Foods to Fuel Your Cardiac Diet A cardiac dieta.k.a. a heart healthy dietcoupled with regular exercise, can help boost your heart health for years to come. Cardiac diet is an unofficial term for a heart healthy diet. This is a plan to eat plenty of nutrient-rich foods fruits and veggies, whole grains, lean poultry and fish. And it also means avoiding saturated fats, trans fats, and excess sodium and sugar. Struggling to cook healthy? We'll help you prep. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter, ThePrep, for inspiration and support for all your meal plan struggles. Following a heart healthyor cardiacdiet would be recommended to someone who has high blood pressure, high cholesterol or any other history of heart disease, or to someone who has a family history of heart disease, explains Lauren Kelly , MS, RD, CDN and founder of Kelly Wellness in New York City. But even if you dont have a cardiovascular health concern, sticking to a cardiac diet is important, since it can reduce risk of heart disease in the future, says Alice H. Lichtenstein, DSc, Gershoff Professor of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. In fact, this is the way we all should be eating. By limiting junk foods and adding more nutritious ones, youll be fueling your body with what it needs to stay healthy and possibly improve your overall health. Following a cardiac diet can help you lose weight, lower your blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels, says Kelly. It can even boost your energy because of your healthier food choices. Results vary from person to person, explains Dr. Lichtenstein, since they depend on a variety of factors, including what you were eating before you went on a cardiac diet, your lifestyle choices (ex Continue reading >>

Healthy Snacks For Diabetics

Healthy Snacks For Diabetics

Choosing the correct snacks can help diabetics remain healthy and avoid any further health complications. For those with diabetes, keeping blood sugar levels at bay Choosing the correct snacks can help diabetics remain healthy and avoid any further health complications. For those with diabetes, keeping blood sugar levels at bay through a well-balanced diet is paramount to maintaining wellness and preventing further health complications. When blood sugar levels are increased due to excess fat and calories in ones diet, it can lead to serious conditions like hyperglycemia, heart disease, venostatis and nerve damage resulting in things such as diabetic ulcers. Snacks are a good way to keep blood sugar levels in check between meals, which may be especially necessary for those who have to go long periods without eating due to work. But its important for diabetics to choose the right snacks so glucose levels stay reasonable, and so they receive proper nourishment via vitamins and minerals as well. Here is a list of healthy foods that diabetics can snack on to stay healthy: These fruits are high in fiber and are a good source of heart healthy unsaturated fats. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, avocados can lower cholesterol and can reduce risks of developing heart disease, as mentioned in Diabetic Living Online. These fruits can be eaten raw with a pinch of salt and pepper or made into guacamole and eaten with low-calorie whole wheat tortilla chips or a fresh vegetable. Broccoli, carrots and red peppers with low-fat dip Vitamin A is bountiful inbroccoli, carrots and red peppers, which is important for eye, teeth and skin health. Broccoli provides folate and fiber while red peppers are rich in the antioxidant lycopene, which gives it and all red fruits and v Continue reading >>

Best Snacks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Best Snacks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes can lead to a wide range of symptoms including high blood pressure, circulation issues, kidney damage, blindness, and skin problems. But the right diet can help manage these symptoms. Healthful snacks for people with diabetes can keep blood sugar in check. They may also help reduce the severity of diabetes symptoms such as high blood pressure. Eating right can feel daunting, particularly at first, but people with diabetes can continue enjoying a wide range of snacks. Foods high in protein High-protein foods include nuts, legumes, animal products such as eggs and cheese, and alternatives to meat such as tofu and mushrooms. Healthful snacks for people with diabetes that are satisfying and rich in protein include: roasted chickpeas apples or celery with almond butter almonds, walnuts, or pistachios trail mix, particularly if it doesn't contain sweetened ingredients hard-boiled eggs plain yogurt, particularly Greek yogurt low-sodium cottage cheese mixed with fresh fruit diced avocado and cherry tomatoes snap peas or other raw veggies with hummus Several of these options can work well as both sweet and savory snacks. Honey-roasted chickpeas provide a good balance of sweet and savory. Nuts can be paired with slices of cheese or dried fruit. Adding nuts or fruit can also make yogurt sweeter or more savory. For the turkey roll-ups, people can use thinly sliced turkey or lettuce to replace the pita. Adding hummus and vegetables makes for a hearty snack. High-fiber snacks Vegetables, legumes, and nuts are excellent sources of fiber. Whole grains, oats, and some fruits are as well. People with diabetes can try some of these high-fiber snacks: smoothies blended with high-fiber, non-starchy vegetables sprouted, whole-grain breads whole-grain or bean pastas oatmeal, mixed wi Continue reading >>

Heart-healthy Snacks

Heart-healthy Snacks

You know you're going to snack. We all do! So you might as well make that snack help your health. It's possible, and it can be delicious. "Reach for snacks that combine 2-3 food groups -- fruit, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats -- and are satisfying," says nutritionist Maryann Jacobsen, RD. You may be surprised by how many options you have. Try these items that are flavorful, satisfying, and easy to prepare. When you're in a rush, reach for seeds or nuts (preferably with no salt or oil), or fruit. If you have a minute or two, put these pairings together. Having a little bit of chocolate daily may lower your risk of stroke and heart attack . Dip a banana in melted dark chocolate , then let it harden in your refrigerator for a sweet, fiber-rich, potassium -loaded snack. Or try dark chocolate -covered almonds for something sweet, crunchy, and rich in protein and good-for-you fat. Just keep your chocolate habit modest, so the calories and sugar don't add up. These are mini-sandwiches you make with crackers. Put a little bit of peanut butter and banana on whole-grain crackers, or mustard and canned tuna, or any other mixture you like. Edamame is another name for soybeans. They're naturally low in sodium and a good source of protein. If you buy them in the pod, theyre quick and easy to steam or microwave. To thaw frozen edamame, run them under hot water. You can also buy them already shelled. Top them off with a squirt of lemon juice. Pair sliced apples with peanut butter or almond butter. Apples are loaded with fiber, and youll get a bonus by pairing them with a nut butter. Eating nuts is linked to lower odds of getting heart disease , says nutritionist and chef Katie Cavuto, RD. Dress up a cup of low-fat vanilla yogurt (choose one wit Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes Written by Brianna Elliott, RD on January 14, 2018 Choosing healthy snacks can be difficult when you have diabetes. The key is to choose snacks that are high in fiber, protein and healthy fats. These nutrients will help keep your blood sugar levels under control. Its also important to snack on nutrient-dense foods that promote overall health. This article discusses 21 excellent snacks to eat if you have diabetes. Hard-boiled eggs are a super healthy snack for people with diabetes. Their protein content really makes them shine. One large hard-boiled egg provides 6 grams of protein, which is helpful for diabetes because it keeps your blood sugar from rising too high after you eat ( 1 , 2 ). In one study, 65 people with type 2 diabetes ate two eggs daily for 12 weeks. By the end of the study, they experienced significant reductions in their fasting blood sugar levels. They also had lower hemoglobin A1c, which is a measure of long-term blood sugar control ( 3 ). Eggs are known to promote fullness, an important aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. This disease is associated with a greater likelihood of becoming overweight and developing heart disease ( 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ). You can enjoy a hard-boiled egg or two for a snack on their own, or garnish them with a healthy topping like guacamole. Yogurt with berries is an excellent diabetes-friendly snack for a variety of reasons. First, the antioxidants in berries may reduce inflammation and prevent damage to cells of the pancreas, the organ responsible for releasing hormones that lower blood sugar levels ( 8 , 9 ). Additionally, berries are a great source of fiber. For example, a 1-cup (148-gram) serving of blueberries provides 4 grams of fiber, which helps slow digestion and stabilize bl Continue reading >>

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