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Snacks For Diabetes

15 Diabetes Friendly Snacks For Noshing

15 Diabetes Friendly Snacks For Noshing

Home Diet and Nutrition News & Advice 15 Diabetes Friendly Snacks For Noshing By: Catherine Roberts on Monday, April 9th Many of us take the often mindless ease of snacking for granted. If you have type I or type II diabetes, the American Diabetes Association claims that planning is vital for managing your blood glucose and avoiding unnecessary weight gain. Here are some healthy snacks for diabetics that will help energize and satisfy hunger while controlling your diabetes symptoms When it comes to enjoying fresh, seasonal fruits while managing your type II diabetes symptoms, WebMD.com says fruit can help satisfy a sweet tooth naturally while providing plenty of satiating fiber. However, the source also reminds us that fruit contains carbohydrates so diabetics need to be mindful of serving sizes, and pair their favorite fruit with some lean protein (i.e., nuts, cottage cheese, or Greek yogurt). A Canadian study has found an increased risk for diabetes among breast cancer survivors over 55 years of agecompared to women who have never had breast cancer. Diabetes, often called the silent killer. It strikes almost 24 million people across the U.S. If you have Type I or Type II diabetes, you're well aware that careand management of your chronic disease is a daily task. A type 2 diabetes diagnoses can be stressful as is, however, when you start to contemplate what you can and cant eat, it can be very overwhelming. Diabetes. It's a word everyone has heard, whether they have it or someone they know has it. The holiday season is a very tempting time of your to fill your mouth with empty carbohydrates and sweets, which can be unhealthy especially if you have diabetes. Diseases are no respecter of person, and celebrities certainly aren't immune to contracting, or developing disea Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

Yes, you can snack if you have diabetes When your stomach starts to rumble, you need a snack that can curb your hunger without blowing your blood sugar. Just like meals, snacks should be a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Aim for one that consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on your meal plan and medication). Here are five that typically get a seal of approval from diabetes educators and nutritionists. Whole-grain crackers, grapes, and cottage cheese Nutrient-rich whole grains like cracked wheat, whole wheat, rye, and quinoa can lower blood sugar and cholesterol. The cottage cheese adds protein to stabilize blood sugar, curb hunger pangs, and provide calcium for strong bones. Buy your favorite whole-grain crackers, and make sure that the first ingredient is whole-wheat flour or another whole grain, such as rye. (Even if the ingredient list says "wheat flour," it is not a whole-grain food unless it specifies "whole-wheat flour.") Arrange on a small plate 2 crackers, 1/4 cup nonfat cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Serving size: 2 crackers, 1/4 cup cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Nutritional information—Calories: 138, Total Carbohydrate: 21.2 g (7%), Dietary Fiber: 1.5 g (6%), Sugars 11.9 g Homemade popcorn Popcorn is high in fiber, and when made from scratch is an all-natural food without additives and artificial flavorings. Pour 1 tablespoon of mild-flavored oil such as canola into a heavy-bottomed medium-large pot. Cover the bottom of the pot with 1/2 cup of popcorn kernels spread in a thin layer. (If the kernels are too crowded, not all of them will pop.) Cover the pot and heat on medium, shaking the pot every minute or so until all of the kernels have popped. Take care not to cook too long, which could Continue reading >>

17 Easy, Low Sugar Snacks For Diabetics (perfect For Picky Eaters)

17 Easy, Low Sugar Snacks For Diabetics (perfect For Picky Eaters)

When you have diabetes, finding healthy low-carb snacks can be a real challenge. Which is really too bad, because snacks can be an important part of our overall nutrition, keeping us going between meals. And when it comes to healthy snacks, it’s important to get a good mix of fiber, protein, and carbohydrates without loading up on added sugar. But too many snacks that claim to be “healthy” are actually high in sugar, trans fats, sodium, and calories. And as you’ve probably noticed, plenty of granola bars, energy bars, cereals, juices, and chips are marketed as healthy, but contain a bunch of added ingredients and chemicals that make them anything but. Also, many of the “healthy snacks” that are available at the grocery store are especially bad snack ideas for diabetics because they can skyrocket your blood sugar – plus they leave you feeling hungry again an hour later. According to the American Diabetes Association, healthy snacks for diabetics should include about 10 to 20 grams of carbohydrates, which helps keep blood sugar levels steady throughout the day. If you’re planning to exercise, they recommend bumping it up to about 30 grams of carbohydrates just before working out (1). Looking for some healthy snack ideas for diabetics that are easy to make and delicious? Check out this list, which provides plenty of options. Quick and Easy Snacks for Diabetics 1. Smoky & Spicy Nut, Sesame, and Coconut “Bacon” Bar Nuts This recipe features a variety of nuts and seeds with a smoky twist that’s sure to satisfy. Bursting with plenty of protein, fiber, and healthy fats, this recipe is packed with flavor and will definitely keep you feeling full until your next meal. Find the recipe here: Oh She Glows 2. Banana & Berry Hemp Seed Pudding Creamy, refreshing, Continue reading >>

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

Between-meal Snacks

Between-meal Snacks

People with diabetes on certain types of tablets or insulin may require one snack between each meal and for supper. However, most people aiming to control their body weight are advised not to have snacks between meals. For specific advice, discuss this with your doctor, dietitian or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. There are lots of healthy choices that can be used as snack foods. Select fruit that is in season (e.g. an apple, a banana, a peach, a pear, 3 apricots, 1/2 a cup of grapes, and 1 cup of strawberries or a slice of rockmelon or watermelon). Other suggestions are listed below: Fruits Fresh or tinned fruit (e.g. 1 peach, 3 apricots, 1 pear, 2 mandarins, grapes, 1/2 a mango, 3 plums, 1 banana, 1 orange, 1 circle of pineapple) Frozen fruit Frozen fruit juice cubes 1 serve of dried fruit Salads & Vegetables Vegetable sticks (e.g. celery, carrot, capsicum, snow peas) with 1 tbsp low fat dip. Celery boats filled with 2 tbsp of cottage cheese and tomato Nuts 30 grams of mixed or unsalted nuts Breads 1 slice of raisin toast or multigrain bread Dairy Products 1 tub of low-fat yoghurt 1 cup of low-fat custard Cereal 1/2 cup of high fibre breakfast cereal Drinks 1 cup or 250 mls of any low fat flavoured milk or soy milk or fruit smoothie 1 café latté Cakes 1 small pikelet or wholemeal crumpet with 1 tsp of jam 1 small fruit or plain scone with 1 tsp of jam Savoury Treats 30 grams of salt reduced pretzels Rice cakes or wheat biscuits topped with cottage cheese, tomato and chives 1 cup of plain popcorn Savoury Bread 1/2 English muffin with tomato slices and 1 slice of reduced-fat cheese. 2 toasted pita bread triangles with 1 tbsp low fat tomato salsa dip. 1 small low fat savoury muffin e.g. reduced fat cheese and tomato Others 2 small sushi rolls (avoid using soy sauce) 1 Continue reading >>

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

Lori Kenyon is a certified nutritional consultant, personal trainer, and co-founder of Ritual Cleanse. She was diagnosed early on in her life with a disorder that prevented her from consuming animal protein and has since had to adapt her diet to compensate. Kenyon advises clients to consume snacks which contain no more than 20 grams of carbohydrates and 140 milligrams of sodium per serving, in accordance with American Diabetes Association guidelines. Stella Metsovas is a certified clinical nutritionist who specializes in food science and human nutrition, with more than 23 years of experience in the field. She is a strong believer in the Paleo-Mediterranean diet and runs a private practice in Los Angeles. Angela Shelf Medearis is the author of The Kitchen Diva's Diabetic Cookbook and has been featured frequently on The Dr. Oz Show as a guest chef, where she is known simply as The Kitchen Diva. She offers some great general snacking advice from her cookbook: Portion sizes are key. Keeping the glycemic load down (a measurement of how much food spikes blood glucose levels) means cutting down on portion sizes, since the measurement accounts for the number of grams of carbohydrates per serving of a food item, which of course will increase with portion sizes. Eating huge portions of even healthy snacks can quickly turn them unhealthy. Snacks between meals can help you reduce portion sizes at main meals and also keep blood sugar levels more stable throughout the day. This can keep you feeling energized and in a good mood as you go about your day. To help control portion sizes, Medearis suggests using small plates, consuming plenty of water while snacking or during meals, and limiting snacks to 100-calorie portions, when feasible, and otherwise just avoiding the habit of eating Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Snacking Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Snacking Mistakes To Avoid

Snacking can help or hinder your glycemic control…. You are the force behind which occurs. Whether we are addressing snacking between meals or evening and bedtime snacks, some familiar mistakes are described below with some helpful tips to conquer those slip-ups. 1. Too Many Carbs Ask anyone what their favorite snacks are…. They are nearly all high carbohydrate foods. Crackers, pretzels, chips, cookies…. All go-to snacks for kids and adults alike. Carbohydrate content of snacks is typically recommended at 15-30 grams. Just one cup of the thin pretzel sticks contains 36 grams of carbohydrate. An 8-ounce container of lowfat strawberry yogurt contains 43 grams of carbohydrate. Only 15 Triscuit-type crackers contains 45 grams of carbohydrate. It is easy to eat more than you need. Tip: Read labels carefully for serving size and total carbohydrate. 2. Not Enough Carbs On the flip side, many people with diabetes go overboard and avoid carbohydrate at snack time. In reality, you need some carbohydrate continuously through the day for energy. Some common low-carbohydrate snacks: 1 ounce of cheese (contains zero carbohydrate), carrot and celery sticks with ranch dressing (about 8 grams of carbohydrate), or ¼ cup of roasted almonds (7 grams of carbohydrate). Remember that typical recommendations are for 15-30 grams of carbohydrate in a snack. Tip: Don’t be afraid to include some carbs in your snack, just be informed about how much you are eating. 3. Caught Without a Plan You are driving the kids to and from extracurricular activities, or you have a crazy day at work, or you are on a business trip…. Hectic schedules can certainly interfere with your eating plan. The best laid plans may get side tracked. But, having a plan in place in the beginning is the key to success. Continue reading >>

28 Guilt-free Healthy Snacks For Diabetics

28 Guilt-free Healthy Snacks For Diabetics

28 Guilt-Free Healthy Snacks For Diabetics 28 Guilt-Free Healthy Snacks For Diabetics Healthy snacks for diabetics dont have to be boring and flavorless. In fact, the American Diabetes Association says its a myth that diabetics have to eat restrictive diets filled only with highly specialized foods. Diabetics, like everyone else, just need to eat healthy foods low in fat, salt, and sugar. To manage blood sugar levels, diabetics do need to be careful when it comes to carbohydrates, including starches and sugars. Thats why weve curated a list of nutrient-rich recipes that keep refined sugars and unhealthy carbohydrates to a minimum. Anyone, including non-diabetics, can use this list to achieve a vibrant and healthy snacking life. Protein-rich and super lean, albacore tuna makes the perfect centerpiece for this healthy diabetic-friendly snack from Diabetes Self-Management . Nonfat greek yogurt, Kalamata olives, red onions, lemon juice, fresh cucumber, and garlic salt top off the ingredients that go into making this snack so flavorful and satisfying, youll want to eat it every day. Tip: Munch on these tuna cups to stop sushi cravings without eating any sticky, refined white rice. Via Nutrition Stripped: Sweet Potato Toast Five Ways Even if youre avoiding sugary refined bread, you can still enjoy all the incredible gourmet toasts everyone is buzzing about. This recipe from Nutrition Stripped is deceptively simple. Who knew you could pop sweet potato slices into a toaster to achieve a crispy breadless toast that is primed for toppings? When the sweet potato slices are crisped to perfection, top them with avocado, tahini, almond butter, mustard, or anything else you like. Via Emilie Eats: Easy Baked Vegan Doritos Feeling deprived can make eating healthy challenging for diabet Continue reading >>

Best Snacks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Best Snacks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes can lead to a wide range of symptoms including high blood pressure, circulation issues, kidney damage, blindness, and skin problems. But the right diet can help manage these symptoms. Healthful snacks for people with diabetes can keep blood sugar in check. They may also help reduce the severity of diabetes symptoms such as high blood pressure. Eating right can feel daunting, particularly at first, but people with diabetes can continue enjoying a wide range of snacks. Foods high in protein High-protein foods include nuts, legumes, animal products such as eggs and cheese, and alternatives to meat such as tofu and mushrooms. Healthful snacks for people with diabetes that are satisfying and rich in protein include: roasted chickpeas apples or celery with almond butter almonds, walnuts, or pistachios trail mix, particularly if it doesn't contain sweetened ingredients hard-boiled eggs plain yogurt, particularly Greek yogurt low-sodium cottage cheese mixed with fresh fruit diced avocado and cherry tomatoes snap peas or other raw veggies with hummus Several of these options can work well as both sweet and savory snacks. Honey-roasted chickpeas provide a good balance of sweet and savory. Nuts can be paired with slices of cheese or dried fruit. Adding nuts or fruit can also make yogurt sweeter or more savory. For the turkey roll-ups, people can use thinly sliced turkey or lettuce to replace the pita. Adding hummus and vegetables makes for a hearty snack. High-fiber snacks Vegetables, legumes, and nuts are excellent sources of fiber. Whole grains, oats, and some fruits are as well. People with diabetes can try some of these high-fiber snacks: smoothies blended with high-fiber, non-starchy vegetables sprouted, whole-grain breads whole-grain or bean pastas oatmeal, mixed wi Continue reading >>

13 Snacks For Type Ii Diabetics

13 Snacks For Type Ii Diabetics

Do you or a loved one have type II diabetes? If so, finding healthy snacks can be difficult, especially when trying to control blood sugar. Most snacks are packed with carbs and will send insulin levels through the roof. Not good. The key is creating delicious snacks that won’t cause blood sugar spikes, taste good, and will fill you up. That’s exactly what we did in this short list. P.S. If you’re into healthy eating tools, check out our awesome Healthy Salad Dressing Recipes Magnet and Gluten-Free and Dairy Free Conversion Magnets at the end of this article! . 13 Snacks for Type II Diabetics Popcorn made in Coconut Oil Air popped popcorn made with coconut oil is one of the best healthy snacks for diabetics. It’s high in fiber and can easily be made in about 5 minutes on the stove. Sprinkle a little sea salt on top, and enjoy! Albacore Tuna It depends on your personal taste buds, but for those who like tuna, it makes a truly great snack. The high amounts of protein will also help curb cravings, and the omega-3 fatty acids help to level blood sugar. Make sure the tuna is albacore, and get the organic brand if it’s in the budget. Baby Carrots Simple, easy, and basic is sometimes the best. The beta-carotene, fiber, and antioxidants will help to level blood sugar and keep you feeling full. 8-12 carrots is a good amount and is less than 25 grams total of carbohydrates. Hummus with Raw Veggies This is another delicious snack diabetics can enjoy without any guilt. Hummus is high in fiber and healthy fats and low in carbs. Take around 1/3 of a cup of hummus and dip with bell peppers, carrots, cucumber, celery, or broccoli. Nuts Nuts like almonds, cashews, and pecans make for a great healthy snack. They are full of high quality fats, have virtually 0 carbs, and contain Continue reading >>

40 Low Carb Snacks For Diabetics

40 Low Carb Snacks For Diabetics

Here at DMP we're all about helping type 2 diabetics (and prediabetics) eat a healthy low carb diet. But when it comes to low carb snacks, it can be a bit tricky if you're new to eating low carb. Or it may just be the case that you just need some inspiration for something new. Either way, today you're in for a wonderful journey into the world of low carb snacks! In fact, we've lined up 40 tasty numbers and best of all, they're friendly for you to eat. Enjoy! #1: Cucumber rolls These appetizers look like something you’d find on a fancy hors d’oeuvres plate at a party, but they’re actually super easy to make, and they clock in at only 4 grams of carbohydrates per serving. The avocado inside is a great source of healthy monounsaturated fats, and the crunchy cucumber will give you a big dose of vitamin K. #2: Veggie slices We know, veggies might sound boring, but there are so many different delicious ways to serve your favorite vegetables sliced raw! Try serving them alongside some delicious hummus, or drizzling them with a light olive oil and balsamic vinegar dressing. Carb count will vary depending on which veggies you use, but here’s a list of low carb vegetables that you can eat all day long if you like. #3: Herb nut crusted chicken nuggets These are about a million times healthier than your typical McNugget, and way more delicious! Protein packed chicken breast is coated with a mixture of almonds and macadamia nuts. One serving will give you a measly 3 grams of carbs and a great amount of fiber, along with healthy nut fats. #4: Hard-boiled egg with cheese Wrap a hard-boiled egg with a slice of your favorite cheddar or mozzarella for a delicious, protein heavy snack. Eggs are a rich source of vitamin B12, vitamin D, iron, and other essential B vitamins. The best Continue reading >>

How To Eat On The Go When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

How To Eat On The Go When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

Since you have type 2 diabetes, you’ve probably got your carb counting down at home and a good idea of what to eat to keep your blood sugar steady. Picking meals and snacks on the go may seem more random, but there are healthy options in every situation. You just have to know what to look for, wherever you are. At the Drive-Thru “The average fast-food meal can run as high as 1,000 calories -- over half of what you may need for the day -- and also run up your blood sugar,” says Toby Smithson, co-author of Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies. “Menu items described as ‘jumbo,’ ‘giant,’ or ‘deluxe’ probably indicate an item that’s as high in sugar and fat as it is in calories.” Your best bet: “A kids’ burger, no cheese, provides a reasonable meal with lower carbs, protein, and fat,” Smithson says. Skip the fries, and go for a side salad, baby carrots, or apple slices instead. In a Sandwich Shop When sandwiches are made to order, you’re able to choose the items you add on, like veggies, and what to leave off, such as fatty mayonnaise or high-sugar barbecue sauce. Plus, many delis offer a combo of half a sandwich with half a salad or a cup of soup, which can be a great way to keep carbs in check, Smithson says. Your best bet: Choose freshly sliced lean meats over deli meats, which tend to have more salt. Turkey and chicken are usually lower in fat and salt, so they’re good bets -- as long as you don’t have them in a heavy mayonnaise-based salad. Choose whole-grain breads and wraps, since they have more nutrients than white bread. But be aware: “That doesn’t always equate to higher fiber or lower carbohydrate,” Smithson says. Generally speaking, a 6-inch tortilla or half a sandwich bun offers 15 grams, or 1 serving, of car Continue reading >>

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes Written by Brianna Elliott, RD on January 14, 2018 Choosing healthy snacks can be difficult when you have diabetes. The key is to choose snacks that are high in fiber, protein and healthy fats. These nutrients will help keep your blood sugar levels under control. Its also important to snack on nutrient-dense foods that promote overall health. This article discusses 21 excellent snacks to eat if you have diabetes. Hard-boiled eggs are a super healthy snack for people with diabetes. Their protein content really makes them shine. One large hard-boiled egg provides 6 grams of protein, which is helpful for diabetes because it keeps your blood sugar from rising too high after you eat ( 1 , 2 ). In one study, 65 people with type 2 diabetes ate two eggs daily for 12 weeks. By the end of the study, they experienced significant reductions in their fasting blood sugar levels. They also had lower hemoglobin A1c, which is a measure of long-term blood sugar control ( 3 ). Eggs are known to promote fullness, an important aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. This disease is associated with a greater likelihood of becoming overweight and developing heart disease ( 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ). You can enjoy a hard-boiled egg or two for a snack on their own, or garnish them with a healthy topping like guacamole. Yogurt with berries is an excellent diabetes-friendly snack for a variety of reasons. First, the antioxidants in berries may reduce inflammation and prevent damage to cells of the pancreas, the organ responsible for releasing hormones that lower blood sugar levels ( 8 , 9 ). Additionally, berries are a great source of fiber. For example, a 1-cup (148-gram) serving of blueberries provides 4 grams of fiber, which helps slow digestion and stabilize bl Continue reading >>

High Protein Snacks For Diabetics

High Protein Snacks For Diabetics

If you have diabetes, your body does not metabolize carbohydrates properly, and you have high blood sugar levels. A carbohydrate-controlled diet can help you manage your blood sugar levels, and healthy, high-protein snacks can help you stick to such a meal plan. The American Diabetes Association suggests including a source of protein at each meal. Video of the Day An 8-ounce container of fat-free plain yogurt contains 13 grams of protein, or 26 percent of the daily value for an individual on a 2,000-calorie diet. Consuming more low-fat dairy products, such as yogurt, may help you manage your diabetes. Yogurt is a good source of calcium, which helps build and maintain strong bones. For a high-protein, low-carbohydrate snack, have plain, fat-free yogurt with cut vegetables, such as broccoli and cauliflower florets or snow peas. A 3-ounce serving of canned light tuna in water provides 16.5 grams of protein. Canned tuna and tuna in a pouch are ready-to-eat foods that you can store without refrigeration at home or work. Tuna provides omega-3 fatty acids, which can lower your risk for heart disease when you consume them regularly. This benefit is important for diabetics because diabetes is a risk factor for heart disease. Have tuna on a slice of whole-wheat bread with lettuce and tomatoes. Sliced turkey breast contains 4.7 grams of protein per ounce and only 28 calories. Take a few slices of turkey and spread them with part-skim ricotta cheese, which provides 14 grams of protein per 1/2-cup serving. Place avocado slices, which provide heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, on the cheese. Roll up each turkey breast slice around the cheese and avocado for your snack. Vary the snack by using fat-free cottage cheese or slices of low-fat Swiss cheese instead of ricotta. A 4-ounce ser Continue reading >>

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