diabetestalk.net

Snack Ideas Gestational Diabetes

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

While most women need to be careful about their diets, others have to be especially careful not to develop gestational diabetes. I’m on the crusade to fight diabetes in all of us, but I’m especially concerned about women with gestational diabetes because their babies are automatically at risk for developing diabetes related issues down the line. And we don’t want that! So let’s discuss a plan to keep moms as healthy as possible during this magical time known as pregnancy. How Did I Get Gestational Diabetes? Insulin is the hormone responsible for getting sugar out of the blood and inside the cells. Our bodies can typically regulate the amount of insulin it needs to produce to get sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells. But during gestational diabetes, the hormones in the placenta that help the baby develop properly also block insulin from working in mommy’s body – causing insulin resistance. So instead of getting moved into the cells, all this sugar becomes stuck outside the cells, creating high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Babies? Diabetic women who become pregnant are at higher risk of developing birth defects. But since gestational diabetes only affects the baby after it’s been formed, but is still growing, the risk becomes macrosomia, or “fat” baby. During gestational diabetes, mom’s pancreas has to work harder to produce more insulin to get rid of all the sugar in the blood that the cells are not absorbing. The placenta doesn’t absorb insulin, but it does let sugar pass through. This extra sugar goes right to the baby. When the baby develops high blood sugar levels, the baby’s pancreas starts to produce additional insulin to eliminate all the extra sugar in the blood, just like mom’s do Continue reading >>

Snacks Ideas - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Snacks Ideas - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

I just met with the dietician yesterday and she said I could try 30-45g carbs for each meal and 15g for snacks. I'm having the hardest time with snacks. I feel like everything I want is more than that or barely anything to eat. What do you all do? For my after breakfast before lunch snack I have 1 light yogurt 1 cup of blackberries and a string cheese. Sometimes I even have fiber bars they are sweet so it is kind of like having a yummy desert without the guilt. Celery and PB is another one of my favorite snacks as well. I just found out that I have gestational diabetes n I'm 10 weeks pregnant and I was going crazy trying to think of health snacks to have, so thank you for giving me ideas I feel a little more calm about it I always pair my snack with a protein, cheese stick or nuts, it's hard having only 15g, you could do fruit or crackers. But I definitely reccomend adding a protein to keep you full until your next meal! Cashew clusters with almonds and pumpkin seeds (Costco) I've been doing that too thanks to this board. But from the sheet I got from my dietician 1 Apple is 30g so I can only do half an apple. Actually, I'm a little confused because that sheet says 1 tbsp of a nut butter would be 1 serving of protein but the packages I have say 2 tbsps = 7g protein. I've been going by the packages since I assume they're more accurate. Fage flip cups have been my go to! I hate that sour Greek yogurt taste and this is more like a mild sour cream, then u mix the fruit with it! High protein, lower on the carbs without being made from artificial ingredients. Yeah, plain Greek yogurt is like eating sour cream (which I hate). Yuck! I found some vanilla Oikos kind today that has a lot more proteins to carbs and no artificial sweeteners so I'm hoping that'll work for me and I c Continue reading >>

Between-meal Snacks

Between-meal Snacks

People with diabetes on certain types of tablets or insulin may require one snack between each meal and for supper. However, most people aiming to control their body weight are advised not to have snacks between meals. For specific advice, discuss this with your doctor, dietitian or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. There are lots of healthy choices that can be used as snack foods. Select fruit that is in season (e.g. an apple, a banana, a peach, a pear, 3 apricots, 1/2 a cup of grapes, and 1 cup of strawberries or a slice of rockmelon or watermelon). Other suggestions are listed below: Fruits Fresh or tinned fruit (e.g. 1 peach, 3 apricots, 1 pear, 2 mandarins, grapes, 1/2 a mango, 3 plums, 1 banana, 1 orange, 1 circle of pineapple) Frozen fruit Frozen fruit juice cubes 1 serve of dried fruit Salads & Vegetables Vegetable sticks (e.g. celery, carrot, capsicum, snow peas) with 1 tbsp low fat dip. Celery boats filled with 2 tbsp of cottage cheese and tomato Nuts 30 grams of mixed or unsalted nuts Breads 1 slice of raisin toast or multigrain bread Dairy Products 1 tub of low-fat yoghurt 1 cup of low-fat custard Cereal 1/2 cup of high fibre breakfast cereal Drinks 1 cup or 250 mls of any low fat flavoured milk or soy milk or fruit smoothie 1 café latté Cakes 1 small pikelet or wholemeal crumpet with 1 tsp of jam 1 small fruit or plain scone with 1 tsp of jam Savoury Treats 30 grams of salt reduced pretzels Rice cakes or wheat biscuits topped with cottage cheese, tomato and chives 1 cup of plain popcorn Savoury Bread 1/2 English muffin with tomato slices and 1 slice of reduced-fat cheese. 2 toasted pita bread triangles with 1 tbsp low fat tomato salsa dip. 1 small low fat savoury muffin e.g. reduced fat cheese and tomato Others 2 small sushi rolls (avoid using soy sauce) 1 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

10 Savvy Snacks For The Gestational Diabetes Diet

10 Savvy Snacks For The Gestational Diabetes Diet

If you’ve got gestational diabetes, you can still get the nutrients you and Baby need and keep your blood glucose levels under control. Enjoy these 10 healthy, diabetic-friendly snacks during pregnancy. 1. Nachos Who says diabetic snacks mean zero taste? These zesty nachos are tantalizing to the taste buds, provide approximately 29 grams of carbohydrates, and are a good way to work in a little calcium and a serving of vegetables into your prenatal diet. Here’s how to make them: Layer 10 corn tortilla chips—just over 1 ounce in weight—on a baking sheet and top with 1/4 cup of grated cheddar cheese and 1/4 cup of chopped green pepper (or use hot peppers, if preferred). Bake for 10 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit, or until cheese is melted and bubbly. Remove from oven and transfer to plate. Top with 1/4 cup of tomato salsa and a tablespoon dollop of low-fat Greek-style yogurt. Health Tip: Because flavored tortilla chips tend to contain lots of sodium and, even worse for moms with gestational diabetes, added sugar, stick to plain corn tortilla chips. 2. Cheese and Crackers Perfect for a healthy, carb-controlled snack break at home or work—and easy enough to pack up for eating on the go—change up your choice of fruit and cheese to keep this snack classic fresh and exciting. These options are paired with a cup of low-fat milk for added calcium and just enough carbohydrates to reach 30 grams: 10 whole grain baked “thin snack crackers” (approx. 8 g of carbs); 1 ounce of cheddar cheese, sliced; 1/2 medium apple, sliced (10 g) and 1 cup of low-fat milk (12 g) 4 pieces of whole grain melba toast (15 g of carbs); 1 tablespoon reduced-fat cream cheese (1 g); 1/4 cup sliced strawberries (3 g) and 1 cup of low-fat milk (12 g) 5 round whole grain crackers (10 g of car Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Meal Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Meal Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Meal IdeasPhoto Credit: ginew/iStock/Getty Images Teresa Cantilli has been working as a Registered Dietitian for 18 years. She is a Certified Diabetes Educator and an ACE Certified Personal Trainer. She earned her Master's Degree in Clinical Nutrition from the New York Institute of Technology. Her work has appeared in The New Standard Newsletter for the NSLIJHS, where she has been working for 10 years, and the book "Migraine Expressions." Gestational diabetes (GDM) is a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. This disorder, characterized by elevated blood sugar levels, is usually diagnosed between 24 and 28 weeks gestation. The cornerstones of managing GDM include regular physical activity and a nutritious, well balanced diet that controls the amount of carbohydrates at meals and snacks. While its essential for women with GDM to meet with a dietitian to receive a meal plan that takes individual calorie and nutrient needs into account, sample menu ideas can provide ideas to get started before this dietitian visit. A healthy diet is an important part of any pregnancy. For women with GDM, a nutritious, balanced diet promotes adequate weight gain and optimal fetal growth -- and also helps manage blood sugar levels. Because carbohydrate foods such as breads, grains, fruit, milk, starchy vegetables and desserts impact blood sugar the most, women with GDM need to ensure they are spreading these foods throughout the day, and limiting added sugars, desserts, and other sweets. Also, women with GDM are encouraged to eat every 2 to 3 hours -- typically 3 meals and 3 snacks daily -- to control blood sugars and provide necessary nourishment. Carbohydrate-containing foods are converted to glucose or sugar in the body, and insulin is necessary to remove e Continue reading >>

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes as a Food Lover Whether food is your comfort, your hobby, or your profession, gestational diabetes is tough. Here's what you can eat. [Photograph: Shutterstock ] In the first few months of my pregnancy, friends often asked me how I was dealing with life without wine, beer, and cocktails; without buttery pieces of toro at my beloved neighborhood sushi bar; without the various other foods most people avoid when they're carrying a baby. Early on, none of those things mattered much to me; I was too sick to crave much more than mac and cheese. Coffee and wine started to taste oddly bitter and flat to me, but it didn't seem that awful to wait 40 weeks to get back to enjoying them. My local bar always managed to serve me some creative alcohol-free concoction. (Pineapple juice and savory Cel-ray? Highly recommended.) I took advantage of California's citrus season, buying pounds of floral Oro Blanco grapefruits and tangerines for making fresh juice. Fruit never tasted better: I sent my husband on wild goose chases for out-of-season mangoes, and celebrated the early arrival of local strawberries by eating a pint every day. And I had ice cream: pints of salted caramel at home, cones of Bi-Rite's insanely rich buffalo-milk soft serve during walks around the park. In challenging moments in those first few months, Max reminded me that "at least it's an excuse to eat all the ice cream you could desire." (I never did convince him to ship me some homemade pints of this crazy chocolate number from New York.) But in mid-March I found myself undergoing a hazing ritual pretty much all pregnant women experience: you show up at the hospital with an empty stomach, get your blood drawn, and then chug a bottle of extra-strong Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Healthy Snacks

Gestational Diabetes Healthy Snacks

I have just been told I have gestational diabetes and am on diet control. Was wondering if any mum have some healthy snack ideas that I can use. I find that the most difficult is when I just want a little snack. So hard to find ones I can have. I make a smoothie in the arvo, I have lunch then a make up a fruit smoothie and that hits the spot. Chantel Veggie sticks & dips. Cheese & crackers. Cottage cheese, tomato on crackers. Fruit & yoghurt as a dip. Have things cut up in the fridge ready to go. Danielle I ate corn thins, snack right fruit slice biscuits, for me brand yogurt, le rice yogurt, light cheese, drink of low fat milk. Having protein when you have carbs is good too, I had hard boiled eggs and tuna (but I think tuna is limited to once a week). If youre out a hamburger from Maccas is ok as a snack (but not a cheeseburger) and a KFC fillets box meal counts as a main meal but thats not including the drink. Good luck. Salleigh Almonds, tomato and avocado cruskits, plenty of fruit, veggie sticks and hommus. Good luck! Katiee If youre after some chocolate, the dieticians told me that nestle soleil diet snack packs are ok. They have yellow packaging. I only eat the choc mouse one but there is crme Brule and others too. If I didnt gag eating yoghurt, I would eat that instead. But cant stand it. Veggie sticks etc probably best. Alyse Sesame snacks, nuts, strawberries, for me yoghurt, baked beans. Nathalie I lived on protein. I ate so much BBQ chicken it wasnt funny. Also those for me yogurts. And apples. Its hard. Get the calorie king app if you have an iPhone. It was my savior. Also light saladas with Vegemite. Jackie 2 vita weets with low fat cheese and slice tomato with cracked pepper or diet/natural yogurt with a piece of fruit or 1/4 cup raw unsalted nuts or 20g 7 Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. It usually arises in the second half of pregnancy and goes away as soon as the baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated, you may experience complications. The first step in treating gestational diabetes is to modify your diet to help keep your blood sugar level in the normal range, while still eating a healthy diet. Most women with well-controlled blood sugar deliver healthy babies without any complications. One way of keeping your blood sugar levels in normal range is by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and turn into blood glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose in the blood is necessary because it is the fuel for your body and nourishment your baby receives from you. However, it's important that glucose levels stay within target. Carbohydrates in Food Carbohydrates are found in the following foods: Milk and yogurt Fruits and juices Rice, grains, cereals and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash Sweets and desserts, such as sugar, honey, syrups, pastries, cookies, soda and candy also typically have large amounts of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called grams. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels and learning the exchange lists. The two most important pieces of information on food labels for a carbohydrate-controlled diet is the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in each serving. Dietary Recommendations It is important to be meet with a registered dietitian to have your diet assessed. The dietitian will calcula Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Survival Tips + Meal And Snack Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Survival Tips + Meal And Snack Ideas

This post contains affiliate links. This means that I make a small commission off of purchases made through my links at no extra charge to you. All opinions are my own. When I was pregnant with Bensen, my biggest struggle came when I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Some women cry when their regular clothes don't fit anymore, I cried when my carb intake became drastically limited and I realized just how many high carb foods I enjoy. I knew going into that pregnancy that I was at risk for GD because I was pre-diabetic, a little overweight and have a family history of Type II diabetes, but getting that confirmation that I indeed had it was rough for me. I'm here to tell you that I survived and that six weeks postpartum, I was healthier than I'd been when I first got pregnant! My diagnosis came the week of Valentine's Day, so my loving husband changed his plans for our celebration. Instead of going to our favorite pasta restaurant, stuffing ourselves silly, and then coming home to lounge on the couch in front of a movie, he planned and prepared a low carb dinner at home and then we went for a walk. It meant a lot to me because I knew how much time and effort he'd put into researching and preparing our meal, and also how much of a sacrifice it was for him to eat the same thing that I was eating and nothing more. He told me later that he was hungry within a couple of hours because the meal just wasn't filling enough for him. During those last two months of my pregnancy, I learned to love vegetables and eat foods that I never would have considered in the past. After a few weeks of testing my blood sugar levels before and after each meal, I learned what I needed to eat and do to keep them level throughout the day. Some days were better than others, but I was diligent a Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Recipes And Meal Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Recipes And Meal Ideas

Tetra Images/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images The food cravings and aversions of pregnancy often make meal planning and eating a bit more complicated, and gestational diabetes only adds to this complexity. When it comes to meal ideas and recipes, a woman with gestational diabetes needs tobe most mindful of carbohydrates, which is the nutrient that impacts blood sugars the most. Gestational diabetes refers to diabetes mellitus (also called "diabetes") that develops in women for the first time during pregnancy. Diabetes means that glucose (sugar) levels in a person's bloodstream are too high. Normally, the hormone insulin , which is produced by an organ called the pancreas, absorbs and uses glucose that comes from your food. During pregnancy, though, a woman's hormones make it difficult for her to use insulin (this is called insulin resistance). In other words, she has to use a lot more insulin, up to three times as much, to bring down glucose levels in the blood. In some pregnant women (around 9 percent, according to the American Diabetes Association) their body cannot make enough insulin to keep their glucose levels within the normal rangethis condition is called gestational diabetes. In order to control blood sugar, women with gestational diabetes need to follow a carbohydrate-controlled diet. Sometimes, if a diet is not enough to control blood glucose levels, a woman may need to also take insulin or an oral medication like metformin . When planning your meals (under the guidance of your healthcare team), there are a couple tidbits to keep in mind. One is that your sensitivity and reactivity to carbohydrates may increase as your pregnancy progresses. Also, pregnancy with diabetes can make big demands on time which can influence your ability to preparehome-made meals. Thi Continue reading >>

Snacks Archives Gestational Diabetes Uk

Snacks Archives Gestational Diabetes Uk

Gestational Diabetes Easter Happy Easter ladies, time to start planning your Gestational Diabetes Easter! To help you with Read More Gestational diabetes risk factors and future diagnosis of diabetes Gestational diabetes risk factors and future diagnosis of diabetes in both the mother and child We felt it Read More Happy Chinese New Year! Kung Hei Fat Choi! For 2018 Chinese New Year we are celebrating the year Read More Pancake Day or Shrove Tuesday Pancake Day is almost upon us (Tuesday 13th February 2018) and many ladies Read More Gestational diabetes Party food Gestational diabetes party food can be hard to try to figure out and Read More Gestational diabetes Christmas Survival Guide! Here's your ultimate survival guide to a gestational diabetes Christmas. Dedicated to all Read More Dreading Halloween with GD? Is the thought of Trick or Treating filling you with dread and turning into Read More Happy 3rd Birthday Gestational Diabetes UK Mums Facebook group! To celebrate 3 years since the launch of the Read More Happy Mother's Day! With Mother's Day coming up soon in the UK (Sunday 26th March), I thought it Read More Soup It's cold outside and you want something warm and filling. You know a salad just isn't going Read More Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Explanation of gestational diabetes & personal reflection of what to expect if you are diagnosed during your pregnancy. Not to worry, it’s can be managed! When you’re pregnant many people love to say “Now you can eat for two!” or “Your pregnant, this is the time you can eat what you want!” Unfortunately, these words of wisdom are not entirely accurate. Every mom-to-be dreads the glucose tolerance test, which involves ingesting a high concentration of glucose (a form of sugar) mixed with water to see if you have gestational diabetes. It’s a grueling test because you have to sit in a doctor’s office or clinic for a few hours while they take blood samples before and 2-3 times after you drink the solution. Before the test, you have to fast for 8 hours and this alone makes mamas pretty aggravated but then with the drink solution you have to deal with a sugar high! Waiting for the results, you cross your fingers and hope that the last 24-28 weeks you’ve had a balanced, healthy diet. I knew that I had increased my carbohydrate and sweet intake more than before I was pregnant, but I was hoping the test would still be negative. Unfortunately, when I got the call from my doctor who then said I had gestational diabetes, my first reaction was guilt. How could I have done this to my baby? Gestational Diabetes 101 I want to make sure I disclose this up front, I am not a doctor, I’m just sharing my experience with gestational diabetes. My daily pregnancy routine consisted of exercising five times a week and eating healthy on most days. However, I knew I could have eaten healthier in the last trimester, but I didn’t (those darn cravings and ravishing bouts of hunger!). As I learned more about gestational diabetes, I realized that our bodies change so much during p Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Snack Ideas

Gestational Diabetes - Snack Ideas

Can anyone help? I have just been diagnosed with GD and have, for the last few days, been managing my blood sugar levels well by adjusting my diet. I am, however, struggling mid-morning, late afternoon and sometimes late evening when I am feeling hungry. I would like some snack ideas that won't impact too much on my blood sugar. I don't mind having to make the odd thing but I would also love ideas of 'ready to eat' stuff (eg is a banana ok?). I think you have to be careful with banana, but you can def have apples, pears, berries and things. So much conflicting advice out there though, maybe try something then check your levels. I'm trying to do the low GI diet to keep it at bay as had GD last time, but it's really difficult and miserable and I'm obsessed with food. Don't know whether to wait until it it properly diagnosed, then do the diet thing. I assumed you get lots of guidance and support from a dietian. Am I wrong? I used to eat apples and cheese together, cutting the apple and the cheese up into squares so that it lasted ages. My GD used to get better as the day progressed, so every now and again I'd have some kettle chips. I found that anything with less than (I think) 15g of carbs converting into sugars was OK, 10g better. So scones and hot cross buns, weirdly, were OK and I used to snack on hot cross buns a lot! On the bright side, following such a rigid diet during my pregnancy (I was diagnosed at 16 weeks) meant that I was actually lighter a week after giving birth than I was when I got pregnant. I also found it helpful to build some exercise into my day, so I used to do Davina's pregnancy exercise DVD if I wanted a little treat. Exercising after a little snack helps lower blood sugar, and it made me feel good! Breakfast was always tough as my GD was worse t Continue reading >>

How To Snack Right With Gestational Diabetes

How To Snack Right With Gestational Diabetes

Written by Natasha Leader, Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator Snacks are a really important part of the gestational diabetes (GDM) diet for several reasons. Simply put, eating regularly will generally help keep your glucose levels tracking smoother. And including a snack between your meals also makes it less likely that you’ll get super hungry. Have you noticed that once you’re hungry it’s much harder to try to control your food intake? The key to a successful GDM diet is ensuring that you’re having a consistent amount of carbs. Snacks are also a good time to fit in your fruit and dairy requirements that you may no longer be able to eat together with your main meal. And often small and frequent intake also helps with other common problems in pregnancy such as nausea and heartburn/reflux. If you’re working or at home with little kids or just aren’t used to including mid-meal snacks, it’s often hard to adjust to this. So planning and preparation is the key! When you’re out and about you’ll probably find it challenging to find something that is both the right amount of carbs and not too high in fat, but also nutritious. So it pays to have a selection of suitable options on hand and variety will help too. I’ve put together this extensive list of suggestions. Your dietitian can help you work out whether you should eat some of these in combination to ensure you’re eating the recommended amounts both in terms of carbohydrate amount but also overall food group and nutrient amounts. Please note, the majority of these products are Australian. Dairy 1 carb snacks (where 1 carbohydrate serve = 15 grams of total carbohydrate) (Always check the product’s nutritional panel for exact info) Cup of low fat/soy milk (if you’d like s Continue reading >>

More in diabetes