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Smoking And Diabetes A Deadly Combination

Smoking And Diabetes Please Stop Smoking | Diabetic Connect

Smoking And Diabetes Please Stop Smoking | Diabetic Connect

I told my new doctor to tell his diabetic patients who smoke my story. This is part of my health problems. I smoked for 22 years, for 10 years I kept trying to quit but had the nagging draw to go back to smoking. I could not stop and thought I would never stop. I finally tried Chantix two years ago and it worked. I didn't have any cravings in the end and I was able to say I am done and have not gone back in two years. What happened the week after I quit smoking completly was a nightmare. The circulation slowly came back to my legs and feet and each night it got worse, the burn, prikly, stabing pain all over my feet. The lotion I put on wasn't working anymore, my levels were good, nothing was working to stop the pain. After one week I finally went to (my old doctor of 10 years) he gave me a 1mg tablet that did nothing. I went to (my old encronologist) he gave me a 10 mg tablet and that did nothing. Finally the 10 year doctor sent me to a nerologist. I went up to 2800mg of gabapentin within two weeks. They tested my feet and legs and my skin is numb from my feet to the middle of both legs. They had to stop the testing because the pain was too much when they tested. And I had taken a pain pill before hand. My nerves in my feet are still dying so the pain is always there. My two old doctors never tested my feet until I walked in with all the pain. Your doctor should be taking a instument and touching your feet while you look away to see if you can feel it. I had symptoms for 10 years (put it in my log book) and my doctor kept saying that there was a cure for this if it got worse. I am not sure what cure but I haven't seen any and the doctor never said what this is. Diabetic neropathy can stop your life and what you want to do fast. My life has stopped at 45 because I am at Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes

Smoking And Diabetes

What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a group of diseases in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Most of the food a person eats is turned into glucose (a kind of sugar) for the body’s cells to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin that helps glucose get into the body’s cells. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or can't use the insulin very well. Less glucose gets into the cells and instead builds up in the blood.1 There are different types of diabetes. Type 2 is the most common in adults and accounts for more than 90% of all diabetes cases. Fewer people have type 1 diabetes, which most often develops in children, adolescents, or young adults.2 How Is Smoking Related to Diabetes? We now know that smoking causes type 2 diabetes. In fact, smokers are 30–40% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than nonsmokers. And people with diabetes who smoke are more likely than nonsmokers to have trouble with insulin dosing and with controlling their disease.3 The more cigarettes you smoke, the higher your risk for type 2 diabetes.3 No matter what type of diabetes you have, smoking makes your diabetes harder to control. If you have diabetes and you smoke, you are more likely to have serious health problems from diabetes. Smokers with diabetes have higher risks for serious complications, including:4 Heart and kidney disease Poor blood flow in the legs and feet that can lead to infections, ulcers, and possible amputation (removal of a body part by surgery, such as toes or feet) Retinopathy (an eye disease that can cause blindness) Peripheral neuropathy (damaged nerves to the arms and legs that causes numbness, pain, weakness, and poor coordination) If you are a smoker with diabetes, quitting Continue reading >>

Tobacco And Diabetes: A Deadly Combination

Tobacco And Diabetes: A Deadly Combination

It has become increasingly clear that cardiovascular disease begins in childhood, with atherosclerotic plaques beginning as early as 8 years of age in high-risk individuals. Some of the risk factors for early heart disease are not modifiable (eg, family history and presence of diabetes), yet others are able to be modulated by factors such as smoking, exercise, and good nutrition. Our ability to identify risk-taking behaviors that increase the risk of early heart disease and to effectively change these behaviors has proven problematic. Continue reading >>

Smoking & Diabetes: A Deadly Combination!

Smoking & Diabetes: A Deadly Combination!

A clinical researcher leveraging the power of science to change the world. Smoking & Diabetes: A Deadly Combination! Smoking is bad for everyone and even worse especially if you have diabetes. It can harm nearly every organ of your body. Smoking is proven to be an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Cigarette is also named as cancer stick because it can cause cancer almost anywhere in your body. Attention smokers! It is now a proven fact that you are at higher risk of developing diabetes. Both high blood glucose levels and smoking damage the walls of the arteries which supply blood and oxygen to heart. The blockage can cause a heart attack! Together the deadly combination of high blood sugar and smoking dramatically speeds up the long term complications of diabetes including: Retinopathy- an eye disease that can cause blindness Neuropathy- damaged nerves to arms and legs Ulcers and infections- that makes your diabetes even harder to control People often think that there are some safe forms of tobacco in the market like hookah, cigar etc. but this isnt true! There is no safe way to smoke! Replacing your cigarette with a cigar or hookah wont help you avoid health hazards.They are equally injurious to your health. Remember: Tobacco hurts and kills people! Quit Smoking! If you dont smoke, never make a plan to start and if you do smoke, challenge yourself to quit smoking. Take it like a major project and be confident, focused and motivated. Tell your close friends and family for motivation. Write down your reasons to quitting and see it everyday. Throw away your cigarettes, matches, lighters and ashtrays. Quitting all at once works for some people while for others gradually cutting down the number of cigarettes per day works Continue reading >>

Why Smoking Is Especially Bad If You Have Diabetes

Why Smoking Is Especially Bad If You Have Diabetes

Smoking is a health hazard for anyone, but for people with diabetes or a high risk of developing the disease, lighting up can contribute to serious health complications. Researchers have long known that diabetes patients who smoke have higher blood sugar levels, making their disease more difficult to control and putting them at greater danger of developing complications such as blindness, nerve damage, kidney failure and heart problems. Now a new study offers the most definitive evidence why: the nicotine in cigarettes. Xiao-Chuan Liu, a professor of chemistry at the California State Polytechnic University, presented results from his study of blood samples from smokers at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition. He found that nicotine, when added to human blood samples, raised levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by as much as 34%. Liu expects a similar effect occurs with diabetic smokers, whom he hopes to test in a follow up study. Hemoglobin A1c — a combination of hemoglobin (which ferries oxygen) and glucose — is a standard indicator of blood sugar content in the body. Doctors always knew smoking can make diabetes worse, but, Liu says, “now we know why. It’s the nicotine. This study also implies that if you are a smoker, and not diabetic, that your chances of developing diabetes is higher.” The higher A1c levels rise in the blood, he says, the more likely it is that other protein complexes, which build up in various tissues of the body, from the eyes, heart and blood vessels, can form, leading to blockages in circulation and other complications. But perhaps more importantly, the results also suggest that nicotine replacement products such as patches and nicotine-containing electronic cigarettes, aren’t a safe option for diabetes patients Continue reading >>

Cnw | Smoking And Diabetes: A Deadly Combination

Cnw | Smoking And Diabetes: A Deadly Combination

Smoking and diabetes: A deadly combination Canadians living with diabetes have the most to gain by quitting /CNW/ - The Canadian Diabetes Association encourages all Canadians living with diabetes who smoke to take action to quit smoking in the next seven days, during National Non-Smoking Week. "There's never a better time to quit than right now," said , who has lived with type 2 diabetes for 10 years and celebrated 2 years smoke-free this January after smoking for more than 35 years. "I know it's hard to quit, but it is possible. And with all the treatments and support available today, it's easier than ever to quit." Canadians living with diabetes who smoke are three times more likely to have a heart attack than people with diabetes who don't smoke.(1) The chemicals in cigarette smoke attack blood vessels, accelerating atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and impairing the blood's ability to carry oxygen to the tissues. The deadly combination of high blood glucose and smoking dramatically increase damage to the blood vessels that feed the heart, brain, eyes, kidneys and peripheral nerves, speeding up the long-term complications of diabetes. "I recommend talking to someone who understands the ramifications of smoking and the various treatments available," Shipley encourages. "In addition to the patch and medications, one helpful step for me was to change my usual patterns - for example, instead of starting my morning with a coffee and cigarette, I went for a walk in my neighbourhood." For more information, tips and resources to help you quit, visit diabetes.ca. Across the country, the Canadian Diabetes Association is leading the fight against diabetes by helping people with diabetes live healthy lives while we work to find a cure. We are supported in our efforts Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Drinking And Smoking: A Dangerous Combination

Diabetes, Drinking And Smoking: A Dangerous Combination

In the Spotlight A healthy lifestyle can help control diabetes. For instance, regular physical activity and a good diet play a big role in managing the disease. But unhealthy habits, such as smoking and drinking too much alcohol, can make diabetes and its complications worse. Why? Let's take smoking first. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), people with diabetes who smoke are three times more likely to die of heart disease than those with diabetes who are nonsmokers. Both diabetes and smoking increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Smoking also increases the risk for all diabetes-related health problems, such as kidney disease, nerve damage and leg and foot infections. According to research published in 2007 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, smoking also may increase the risk for developing diabetes if you don't already have it. Diabetes and smoking are particularly relevant in the Veteran community. Nearly 25 percent of Veterans who receive health care through VA have diabetes and almost 20 percent smoke. Quit Smoking The best thing to do for your health, whether or not you have diabetes, is to quit smoking as soon as you can. Research shows most smokers want to quit. According to VA, 57 percent of Veterans who are current smokers reported that they tried to quit within the last year. The addictive nature of nicotine can make quitting a major challenge. If you want to quit, talk to your health care team. You can work with a health behavior coordinator or join a class with other Veterans who are trying to quit. VA also offers smoking cessation medicines. "If you are having trouble quitting, at least cut back," advised Dr. Sharon Watts, a Nurse Practitioner and Certified Diabetes Educator for VA. "Cutting back is better than noth Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes Is Your Worst Enemy. 6 Ways To Defeat It

Smoking And Diabetes Is Your Worst Enemy. 6 Ways To Defeat It

Browse: Home Smoking And Diabetes Is Your Worst Enemy. 6 Ways To Defeat It Smoking And Diabetes Is Your Worst Enemy. 6 Ways To Defeat It Smoking is obviously risky for health and a person who smokes might bring additional health related complications. One pretty example of such complications is diabetes. Today, one can easily identify close relationships between smoking and diabetes. Researchers have found clear evidence that ten out of ten diabetes patients, those are smokers, have very high blood glucose levels; and it is shaping the disease to a new complex height. Due of smoking a diabetes patient has to face additional abnormalities such as nerve damage, heart problems, blindness, dysfunction of kidney etc. A very recent study has already identified the sole criminal responsible for this- yes no surprise, it is typically the nicotine resides in cigarettes. A chemistry professor of California State University named Xiao Chuan Liu recently presented the outcome of his study from blood and urine samples of smoker diabetes patients at a seminar where ties between smoking and diabetes were evident. He has shown that the level of hemoglobin A1c (a mixture of hemoglobin and glucose, a smart indicator to measure blood sugar in human body) can be raised by approximately thirty four percent if the nicotine can mix-up with blood samples. Though doctors knew that smoking can turn diabetes worse, now they can become more precise to identify the real culprit, Liu added. This particular study implies, a healthy person having no current health abnormalities can also be affected through smoking which can lead him to a diabetes patient. Now we also know that if the A1c level increases in human blood it can eventually create blockages in heart. One more thing, avoiding conventional Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes: A Deadly Combination

Smoking And Diabetes: A Deadly Combination

Why is smoking so bad for people with diabetes? People with diabetes face an even greater risk from smoking: just like high blood glucose levels, the noxious chemicals in cigarette smoke attack blood vessels, accelerating atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and impairing the blood’s ability to carry oxygen to the tissues. Together, the deadly combination of high blood glucose and smoking dramatically increase damage to the blood vessels that feed the heart, brain, eyes, kidneys and peripheral nerves, speeding up the long-term complications of diabetes. People with diabetes are already at increased risk for heart disease; however, if they smoke, they face three times the risk for heart attack of a person with diabetes who does not smoke. Quitting smoking is one of the most important things individuals living with diabetes can do to help prevent or delay the onset of complications. Get as much information as you can from your doctor or pharmacist about options to help you quit, including medications that can increase your chances of success by three to four times. Similar to the day-to-day process of managing your diabetes through diet, exercise and regular blood glucose testing, managing to quit smoking is something that is best approached by incorporating it into your daily routine. Nicotine replacement therapy, whether in the form of a gum, patch or inhaler, to help ease withdrawal symptoms, is now available without a prescription in pharmacies.It is very safe, even for people with heart disease, pregnant women or teenagers, and it’s important when using it to know that you can use as much as is necessary to stem your particular cravings. Another prescription drug called Varenicline (Champix) acts by stimulating the receptors in the brain responsible for in Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes A Deadly Combination

Smoking And Diabetes A Deadly Combination

Smoking and Diabetes a Deadly Combination Smoking is bad for everyone but it is worse for diabetic patients. Smoking and diabetes a deadly combination for anyone. Unsurprisingly, smoking can not only make your diabetes worse, but it can also lead a healthy person to become a diabetic patient !! Putting smoking and diabetes, a deadly combination together can put you at risk of facing additional abnormalities such as heart related problems, kidney dysfunction, nerve damage, blindness and more. Nicotine and Diabetes Nicotine residing in cigarettes is solely responsible for all these intimidations to your overall health. When nicotine mixes with blood, hemoglobin A1c is raised by approximately thirty-four percent. Hemoglobin A1c is a mixture of glucose and hemoglobin that is used as an indicator to measure blood sugar in the human blood. Smoking Damages Blood Vessels Poisonous chemicals like nicotine harden arteries to weaken the ability of blood to carry oxygen all through the body. All the blood vessels that feed oxygen to the heart, brain, kidneys and eyes are damaged with a deadly combination of high blood glucose and smoking. Just like high sugar levels, poisonous chemicals in smoke released while smoking cigarettes attack blood vessels. According to a study performed on the similar topic, diabetics who smoke have higher blood sugar levels compared to the ones who don’t smoke. Ten out of ten diabetes patients who smoke revealed very high blood glucose levels in the study. Smoking and Diabetes Treatment Heart attack, stroke, kidney damage and an increase in bad cholesterol are only some of the problems associated with smoking that make your diabetes treatment even more challenging. Diabetes-related complications that you were supposed to face at the later stages of yo Continue reading >>

Smoking & Diabetes: A Deadly Combination!

Smoking & Diabetes: A Deadly Combination!

Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn StumbleUpon Tumblr Pinterest Reddit VKontakte Odnoklassniki Pocket Smoking is bad for everyone and even worse especially if you have diabetes. It can harm nearly every organ of your body. Smoking is proven to be an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Cigarette is also named as cancer stick because it can cause cancer almost anywhere in yourbody. Attention smokers! It is now a proven fact that you are at higher risk of developing diabetes. Both high blood glucose levels and smoking damage the walls of the arteries which supply blood and oxygen to heart. The blockage can cause a heartattack! Together the deadly combination of high blood sugar and smoking dramatically speeds up the long term complications of diabetes including: Retinopathy- an eye disease that can cause blindness Neuropathy- damaged nerves to arms andlegs Ulcers and infections- that makes your diabetes even harder tocontrol People often think that there are some safe forms of tobacco in the market like hookah, cigar etc. but this isnt true! There is no safe way to smoke! Replacing your cigarette with a cigar or hookah wont help you avoid health hazards.They are equally injurious to your health. Remember: Tobacco hurts and kills people! QuitSmoking! If you dont smoke, never make a plan to start and if you do smoke, challenge yourself to quitsmoking. Take it like a major project and be confident, focused and motivated. Tell your close friends and family for motivation. Write down your reasons to quitting and see it everyday. Throw away your cigarettes, matches, lighters and ashtrays. Quitting all at once works for some people while for others gradually cutting down the number of cigarettes per day works. Use a nicotine patch Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Smoking: A Deadly Combination

Diabetes And Smoking: A Deadly Combination

Smoking is bad news. It is the leading cause of avoidable death in the United States, accounting for nearly half a million deaths each year. Smoking increases your risk of incurring a number of Diabetes complications. The Effects of Smoking Everyone knows smoking causes lung cancer, and more people die of lung cancer each year in the U.S. than any other type of cancer. But did you know that smoking can affect the health of your heart, kidneys, eyes, nerves, muscles and joints, and more? Those with Diabetes are three times more likely to die of cardiovascular disease, such as heart attack or stroke, but add in smoking and that risk multiplies. That's because smoking…. Decreases the amount of oxygen reaching tissues Increases cholesterol levels and the levels of some other fats in your blood Damages and constricts blood vessels Increases blood pressure Smoking increases your blood sugar levels and decreases your body's ability to use insulin, making it more difficult to control your Diabetes. When blood vessels are constricted, the amount of blood circulating in arteries and veins is limited. This can lead to peripheral vascular disease, which can worsen foot ulcers and contribute to leg and foot infections. In addition, smokers with Diabetes are at increased risk of developing nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy) and eye disease (diabetic retinopathy). But wait, the bad news doesn't end yet! In addition to lung cancer, smoking may also contribute to mouth, throat and bladder cancer. Those who smoke are more susceptible to colds and respiratory infections. Smoking increases muscle and joint pain. Smoking can cause impotence in men and miscarriage or stillbirth in pregnant women. Quit Smoking If you are a smoker, you know you should q Continue reading >>

Nicotine And Blood Sugar A Dangerous Combo

Nicotine And Blood Sugar A Dangerous Combo

March 28, 2011 (Anaheim, Calif.) -- Nicotine appears to be the main culprit responsible for high blood sugar levels in smokers with diabetes, according to new research presented here at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society. Those constantly high blood sugar levels, in turn, increase the risk of serious diabetes complications such as heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, and nerve damage. ''If you have diabetes and if you are a smoker, you should be concerned about this," says Xiao-Chuan Liu, PhD, a researcher at California State Polytechnic University in Pomona, who spoke about his findings at a news conference Sunday. In his laboratory study, he exposed human blood samples to nicotine. The nicotine raised the level of hemoglobin A1c, a measure of blood sugar control. The higher the nicotine dose, the more the A1c level rose. For years, doctors have known that smokers who have diabetes tend to have poorer blood sugar control than nonsmokers with diabetes. However, until Liu's study, he says, no one could say for sure which of the more than 4,000 chemicals in cigarette smoke was responsible. About 26 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association, although 7 million of those are undiagnosed. Liu took red blood cells from people and treated them in the laboratory with glucose and nicotine at various concentrations. To measure the effects of the nicotine on the levels of blood sugar, he used the hemoglobin A1c blood test. This test measures the average blood sugar control for the previous three months or so. The higher the test results, the more uncontrolled the blood sugar is. Liu used doses of nicotine comparable to what would be found in the blood of smokers. The levels of nicotine he used in the lab would corresp Continue reading >>

How Important Is It For Me To Quit Smoking If I Have Diabetes? | Living With Diabetes - Sharecare

How Important Is It For Me To Quit Smoking If I Have Diabetes? | Living With Diabetes - Sharecare

How important is it for me to quit smoking if I have diabetes? Smoking is unhealthy for anyone, but smoking and diabetes is a truly deadly combination. Even if you didn't smoke, your risk of getting heart disease or having a stroke increases 24 times just because you have diabetes. Diabetes can cause blocked arteries, which leads to heart attacks and strokes. Smoking makes this even worse and the risk of serious heart problems when you have diabetes and smoke is about 10 times greater than for someone who doesn't have diabetes or smoke. You can't change the fact you have diabetes, but hard as it is, you can stop smoking. If you decide you are ready to stop smoking, there are many effective help programs available. Contact the American Lung Association in your area, or ask your physician or diabetes educator for help. They may refer you to a good stop-smoking program in your area. Nicotine patches and nicotine gum are also available from the drugstore, and they can help you deal with your nicotine addiction while you stop smoking. Continue reading >>

Smoking & Diabetes

Smoking & Diabetes

Smoking is bad for everyone. It increases your risk for lung cancer, heart attack and stroke. Each day, 100 Canadians die of a smoking-related illness.1 People with diabetes face an even greater risk from smoking: just like high blood glucose (sugar) levels, the poisonous chemicals in cigarette smoke attack blood vessels. This contributes to hardening of the arteries (or what is known as atherosclerosis) which impairs the blood’s ability to carry oxygen throughout the body. Together, the deadly combination of high blood glucose (sugar) and smoking dramatically increases damage to the blood vessels that feed the heart, brain, eyes, kidneys and peripheral nerves, speeding up the long-term complications of diabetes. How can I quit? The first critical step is to make the decision to quit. It may help to set a firm, short-term quit date. In the meantime, get as much information as you can from your doctor or pharmacist about options to help you quit, including medications that can increase your chances of success. Similar to the day-to-day process of managing your diabetes through diet, exercise and regular blood glucose (sugar) testing, managing to quit smoking is something that is best approached by incorporating it into your daily routine. Why is it so hard to quit? Simply put, nicotine is among the most addictive drugs. Smoking is not a habit or a lifestyle choice. It’s an addiction that over time, changes brain chemistry. Nicotine has its effect by attaching to certain receptors in the brain, and when you become a smoker these receptors increase in number. If not regularly stimulated with nicotine, the increased receptors begin to make a person feel very unpleasant, a phenomenon known as withdrawal. Both withdrawal and the craving it causes are tied to changes in br Continue reading >>

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