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Sleep Apnea And Type 1 Diabetes

Sleep Apnea: A Hidden Enemy In Diabetes

Sleep Apnea: A Hidden Enemy In Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you may also have obstructive sleep apnea, or OSA. In fact, up to 80% of people with Type 2 diabetes have some form of OSA. After working with sleep doctors for many years, I knew a lot about OSA. But when I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, the whole subject took on greater importance. Why do I call OSA a hidden enemy? Because it is easy to have the condition for years without being aware of it. Like diabetes, it can sneak up on you. One connection to diabetes is that OSA may worsen insulin resistance. Sleep doctors have seen proof: When OSA is treated, their patients’ blood sugar levels improve. What is apnea? If others say you snore, stop breathing, and gasp for air or choke while sleeping, you may have OSA. It is caused by a relaxed throat and tongue that close up your airway, making you unable to breathe. If your tongue is large or if you have fat deposits in the airway or around your neck and abdomen, sleep apnea can be severe. This is why OSA is so common among obese people. Not being able to breathe for seconds and even minutes puts a strain on your heart. As noted above, it also increases insulin resistance. So you may have high blood pressure and high blood sugar that do not respond to medication as they should. Doctors now understand that lack of deep sleep makes diabetes worse, adding to your body’s stress. OSA contributes to this by forcing you out of deep sleep over and over, sometimes hundreds of times a night as you struggle to breathe. OSA is called a silent killer because it makes you sleepy during the day, which leads to accidents while driving or at work. Also, people with OSA can die in their sleep due to sudden heart attacks, possibly from low oxygen levels or the stress of frequent awakenings. Do you have it? Although o Continue reading >>

Sleep Apnea In Kids: A Total Nightmare

Sleep Apnea In Kids: A Total Nightmare

Once linked primarily to overweight older men with Type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea can affect kids with diabetes, too. If your child snores, is a restless sleeper, or is sleepy during the daytime, talk to your doctor or diabetes care team about getting your child a sleep test. If your child with diabetes sleeps restlessly or snores at night, it may be a good idea to have him or her checked for sleep apnea. It can make a difference in their health, as poor sleep quality is directly linked to elevated blood glucose levels and many other complications. If left undiagnosed, sleep apnea can have a wide-ranging impact on diabetic kids, including problems with good glucose control, a tendency to put on weight or a general failure to thrive. A 2012 University of Arizona study of 50 children with Type 1 diabetes found a direct connection between less restful sleep and daytime fluctuations in blood glucose levels among those studied. Those with sleep apnea also had much higher blood sugar levels overall, the study concluded. Dr. Michelle Perfect, the lead investigator, believes theres a strong connection between blood sugar fluctuations and sleep quality. Writing in the academic journal Sleep, Dr. Perfect observed that despite adhering to recommendations for good diabetic health, many youth with type 1 diabetes have difficulty maintaining control of their blood sugarsWe found that it could be due to abnormalities in sleep, such as daytime sleepiness, lighter sleep and sleep apnea. All of these make it more difficult to have good blood sugar control. Unfortunately, an estimated 80% to 90% of sleep apnea cases arent diagnosed. Thats too bad because, unlike diabetes, sleep apnea can be cured, or at least controlled, quite effectively once diagnosed. Sleep, particularly dee Continue reading >>

Sleep Characteristics In Type 1 Diabetes And Associations With Glycemic Control: Systematic Review And Meta-analysis - Sciencedirect

Sleep Characteristics In Type 1 Diabetes And Associations With Glycemic Control: Systematic Review And Meta-analysis - Sciencedirect

Sleep characteristics in type 1 diabetes and associations with glycemic control: systematic review and meta-analysis Author links open overlay panel SirimonReutrakula Adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) reported poorer sleep quality based on questionnaire scores than adults without T1D. Adults with T1D and poor sleep quality or sleeping 6 hours had poorer glycemic control. Children with T1D had shorter measured sleep duration than children without T1D. The estimated prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adults with T1D was 51.9%. Adults with T1D and moderate-to-severe OSA tended to have poorer glycemic control. The association between inadequate sleep and type 2 diabetes has garnered much attention, but little is known about sleep and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Our objectives were to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing sleep in persons with and without T1D, and to explore relationships between sleep and glycemic control in T1D. Studies were identified from Medline and Scopus. Studies reporting measures of sleep in T1D patients and controls, and/or associations between sleep and glycemic control, were selected. A total of 22 studies were eligible for the meta-analysis. Children with T1D had shorter sleep duration (mean difference [MD] = 26.4 minutes; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 35.4, 17.7) than controls. Adults with T1D reported poorer sleep quality (MD in standardized sleep quality score = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.33, 0.70), with higher scores reflecting worse sleep quality) than controls, but there was no difference in self-reported sleep duration. Adults with TID who reported sleeping >6 hours had lower hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels than those sleeping 6 hours (MD = 0.24%; 95% CI = 0.47, 0.02), and participants reporting good sleep quality had lower Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sleep Apnea: How Sleep Affects Blood Glucose And Diabetes

Diabetes And Sleep Apnea: How Sleep Affects Blood Glucose And Diabetes

Treat Apnea to Control Diabetes? Sleep apnea can affect diabetes control in many ways. Struggling for air may put your body into fight-or-flight mode, releasing stress hormones that can raise blood glucose levels. If you're tired, you won't want to take that walk around the block after lunch. While you're at work, you might keep snacking to stay awake. But can treating sleep apnea lead to better blood glucose control? Arvind Cavale, M.D., an endocrinologist in Feasterville, Pennsylvania, refers about 60 percent of his patients with type 2 diabetes for sleep studies. Cavale says treating sleep apnea reduces insulin resistance, improves alertness and motivation, and leads to more stable blood glucose levels. "We use correction of sleep apnea as a tool in controlling diabetes," he says. Does This Sound Like You? This is not a happy scenario: You're soooo tired. As soon as your head hits the pillow, you're asleep. But a little while later, someone nudges you awake. You go back to sleep. Just as you get into a deep sleep, you're nudged again. Sleep ... nudge ... sleep ... nudge. All night long. The next day, you might wake up with a headache, snap at your family over breakfast, have trouble concentrating at work. Irritability. Car accidents. Depression. High blood pressure. All because of those nightmarish nudges throughout the night. If you have obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA), you're getting those nudges. It's your body fighting for air. And sleep apnea may be one explanation for difficulty in controlling blood glucose and blood pressure levels. With OSA, something partly or completely blocks your airway when you're asleep. It could be your tongue. It could be the soft tissues in the back of your throat relaxing too much. Snoring is a sign that air is being forced p Continue reading >>

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

According to National Sleep Foundation, 63% of American population do not get enough daily sleep. Do you also know that most people who suffer from diabetes often have poor sleeping habits? This includes irregular sleeping schedule, difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep. And although little has been mentioned about caregivers and parents of diabetes patients, they are more likely to acquire poor sleeping habits and have a higher tendency to suffer from sleeping problems and consequently develop Type 2 diabetes themselves. So if you have diabetes or are currently caring for someone who has diabetes, this article will educate you more about how sleeping disorders can affect your health and how you can get better sleep. This article will cover the following topics: Relationship Between Sleep and Diabetes Your health and sleep go hand in hand. When you do not sleep enough, your body does not get the needed time to repair. As a result, you tend to be unfocused and irritable, and you suddenly have the urge to eat. If this scenario sounds too familiar to you, maybe you should rethink about the relationship between sleep and your diabetes. The Missing Link — Hormones Sleep plays a crucial role in restoring our body cells. Under healthy conditions, after eating, the pancreas secretes insulin to signal fat cells and muscles to absorb the glucose from food to be used for energy creation and prevents the body from using fat as energy source. This chain of reaction causes the blood glucose levels to resume normal. And to prevent the individual from feeling hungry, the body produces the hormone leptin to depresses the appetite. However, when it comes to diabetes individuals, the muscle and fat cells fails to respond to insulin. This causes a high glucose level in the bloodst Continue reading >>

How Can Type 1 Diabetes Affect Sleep?

How Can Type 1 Diabetes Affect Sleep?

We all know the miserable after-effects of a poor night’s sleep. Unfortunately, that dreary, frazzled, anxious state can be a more common reality for for someone with Type 1 diabetes. Doctors at the Sleep Disorders Program at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center estimate that 40-50% of people with diabetes complain of poor sleep. And getting a good night’s rest can help in blood glucose management as well as overall health. So what should you watch out for if you have Type 1? And how can you better your odds of a good night’s rest? Here are the most common sleeping disorders that you may be faced with and some basic advice on how to maintain healthy sleep hygiene. Sleep Apnea A person with sleep apnea stops and starts breathing repeatedly while asleep, preventing them from achieving deeper states of sleep. Warning signs of sleep apnea include: daytime drowsiness excessive nighttime snoring There are two kinds of sleep apnea – Obstructive sleep apnea – occurs when the upper airway or throat region narrows, oxygen levels decrease, and eventually the brain triggers a response to wake the person up (at least enough to take a full breath and reopen the airway). Central sleep apnea – occurs when brain signals to the muscles that control breathing are confused. Both types of sleep apnea prevent a person from getting the kind of deep, restful sleep needed to wake up feeling refreshed. While scientific research has long highlighted a correlation between Type 2 diabetes and obesity and an increased risk for obstructive sleep apnea, sleep apnea occurrences is also high in those with Type 1 diabetes. Some studies have found obstructive sleep apnea in as many as 30% of adults with Type 1 diabetes. And the majority of those tested maintained a healthy, normal weig Continue reading >>

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Common In Type 1 Diabetes

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Common In Type 1 Diabetes

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Common in Type 1 Diabetes BOSTON Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common in people with type 1 diabetes and is associated with abnormal glycemia and microvascular complications but not body mass index (BMI), a new study finds. The data were presented June 7, 2015 here at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2015 Scientific Sessions by Laurent Meyer, MD, an endocrinologist at Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, France. The link between type 1 diabetes and OSA has been reported in three previous small trials, but this study of 90 adults with type 1 diabetes is the largest such trial to date and the first to use both continuous glucose monitoring and sleep studies to investigate the relationship between OSA and both hypo- and hyperglycemic variation, Dr Meyer explained. In the study, OSA was particularly common among those with long disease duration and was associated with higher rates of diabetes complications, including retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy. "The main message for clinicians is to think of OSA in type 1 patients with a long duration of diabetes. With the design of our study we can't say check at 10 or 15 years, but in my opinion if [a patient has] a duration of more than 20 years, it's important to check for OSA," Dr Meyer told Medscape Medical News in an interview. Sleep apnea is ordinarily associated with obesity, but the French patients in this study were not excessively overweight, with a mean BMI of 26 kg/m2, suggesting that the OSA may be due to other factors. "In our study the BMI was near normal.I think perhaps it's linked to cardiac autonomic neuropathy.Like other degenerative complications, it may be linked to an infiltration of soft tissue in the upper airways by glycated products. I think OSA must be considered a Continue reading >>

The Incidence Of Sleep Apnea In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

The Incidence Of Sleep Apnea In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Endocrine Abstracts (2016) 41 EP491 | DOI: 10.1530/endoabs.41.EP491 The incidence of sleep apnea in patients with type 1 diabetes Ina Darashkevich1, Tatiana Mokhort2, Lola Nikanava1 & Serhey Tishkovsky1 Author affiliations View ePoster Download ePoster 1Grodno State Medical University, Grodno, Belarus; 2Belarussian State Medical University, Minsk, Belarus. It is determined that sleep apnea itself can affect the level of HbA1c, thereby affecting the compensation of carbohydrate metabolism in type 2 diabetes. Objective: To determine the quantity and type of sleep apnea in diabetes type 1, depending on the level of HbA1c. Materials and methods: The study involved 50 people with type 1 diabetes without the presence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy or diseases of the pulmonary system and ENT with HbA1c levels of 6.2% vs 9.2%. Patients performed polysomnographic monitoring-SOMNOlab2 (PSG) Polysomnography(R&K), daily monitoring of blood glucose-CGMSGold by MedtronikMINIMED (USA). Conclusions: OA and CA at type 1 diabetes are found mainly in the REM phase, S1 and S2 stages of sleep. Compensated type 1 diabetes occurs in OA 2.25 times more likely to have a longer duration and which requires further analysis. It was determined that the CA occurs for decompensated patients 5.4 times more often than in the comparison group. This describes the violation of a central mechanism for the regulation of respiration. Sleep apnea for examined patients was not accompanied by a decrease in oxygen saturation, but the increase in AG bedtime and MGS reduce blood oxygen saturation. Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome In Type 1 Diabetic Patients Treated With Insulin Pump (at1home) (at1home)

Prevalence Of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome In Type 1 Diabetic Patients Treated With Insulin Pump (at1home) (at1home)

Prevalence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Type 1 Diabetic Patients Treated With Insulin Pump (At1Home) Prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by oxymetry, confirmed by polysomnography [TimeFrame:2 years] Number of patients presenting an obstructive apnea syndrome Relationship between sleep apnea syndrome severity and micro/macro vascular complications of type 1 diabetes [TimeFrame:2 years] Number and type of micro and macro vascular complications will be analysed from medical history and new events will be collected at each visit and validated by endocrinologist Relationship between sleep apnea syndrome severity and type 1 diabetes control [TimeFrame:2 years] Results from regularly prescribed HbA1c analysis will be collected Compliance of the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) after 3 months of use in patients with type 1 diabetes treated for severe SAS. [TimeFrame:2 years] Objective compliance to the CPAP treatment is daily recorded into the device and will be provided by home care provider Incidence of new cardiovascular events and changes in microangiopathic complications of diabetes patients depending on the presence of sleep apnea syndrome and to the adherence to CPAP treatment in case of sleep apnea syndrome treated [TimeFrame:2 years] New events will be collected by asking the patients, after 1 year and 2 years Continue reading >>

Sleeping With Type 1 Diabetes: Osa And Other Sleep Issues Linked

Sleeping With Type 1 Diabetes: Osa And Other Sleep Issues Linked

A couple weeks ago we discussed how sugar/glucose levels can affect your sleeping and how they correlate with sleep disorders and overall tiredness. Sleep can affect your blood sugar levels, and your blood glucose control can also affect your sleep. It’s a vicious cycle. High blood sugar levels make it less comfortable for you to sleep by feelings of warmness, irritability and unsettledness. Low Blood sugar levels cause a variety of problems within your central nervous system which can include nightmares, confusion, sleepwalking and restlessness. In our Educational Series for National Diabetes Month we are going to briefly discuss the relationship between Type 1 diabetes, OSA, and other common sleep disturbances. Diabetes Types Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Symptoms usually start in childhood or young adulthood. People often seek medical help, because they are seriously ill from sudden symptoms of high blood sugar. The person may not have symptoms before diagnosis. Usually the disease is discovered in adulthood, but an increasing number of children are being diagnosed with the disease. Those who are obese or have a higher BMI are more at risk. Episodes of low blood sugar level (hypoglycemia) are common. There are no episodes of low blood sugar level, unless the person is taking insulin or certain diabetes medicines. It cannot be prevented. It can be prevented or delayed with a healthy lifestyle, including maintaining a healthy weight, eating sensibly, and exercising regularly. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common form of sleep apnea. Apnea literally translates as "cessation of breathing" which means that during sleep your breathing stops periodically during the night for a few seconds. These lapses in breathing can occur for up to Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sleep Apnea: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Sleep Apnea: What You Need To Know

Do you snore ? Do you feel fatigued every day? Do you wake up frequently throughout the night? It may be that the shallow breathing or breaks in breathing caused by sleep apnea are the reason. If you have diabetes, it is critical to manage your sleep apnea in order to manage your diabetes. Some 18 million Americans are diagnosed with sleep apnea, but millions more have it and dont know it. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy If you have diabetes, sleep apnea can make it almost impossible for you to manage your diabetes. This is because sleep apnea causes a pause in your breathing while you sleep and increases carbon dioxide in your blood, which leads to: Insulin resistance so that the body doesnt use insulin effectively. This causes more sugar in the blood stream leading to high blood sugars A higher incidence of heart problems or cardiovascular disease Inadequate rest or sleep can also lead to lack of motivation to exercise or plan meals. This often leads to irritability, which can affect relationships with family, friends and coworkers. Sleepiness also can cause people to forget to take their medications and lead to further diabetes complications. Sleep apnea may be genetically linked and it is most commonly found in those who are overweight or obese, people who smoke and are over the age of 40. There are different types of sleep apnea, one of which is obstructed sleep apnea (or OSA), which is when breathing is interrupted by a physical block to airflow. With OSA, snoring is common. The National Institutes of Health report that 12 million Americans have OSA, and for people with type 2 diabetes it is a common condition to have. R Continue reading >>

Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

Tweet Sleep Apnoea, also called sleep apnea, is a common breathing disorder that affects many people whilst they sleep, could be an early warning that diabetes development is underway. Numerous medical studies have linked obstructive sleep apnoea with greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. According to experts, side effects directly related to sleep apnoea could influence the metabolism of people as they sleep. The condition is surprisingly common, to the extent that sleep apnoea has been termed: ‘the silent epidemic’. Sleep apnoea affects as many as one-tenth of middle-aged men, and manifests itself as an interruption of breathing during the hours of sleep. The correlation between sleep and diabetes is well-proven, with interruptions to deep sleep a key part of diabetes risk. Obesity makes both diabetes and sleep apnoea more likely. Why does sleep apnea damage the body and lead to greater risk of diabetes? Sleep apnoea is thought to be dangerous because it affects the concentration of oxygen within the bloodstream. It also plays havoc with sleep patterns, and can lead to daytime fatigue in more serious cases. The actual mechanism that causes sleep apnoea to influence oxygen If I have sleep apnea, am I a diabetic? Not necessarily, but having sleep apnoea does mean an increased risk of developing diabetes. Is OSAS the same as sleep apnea? OSAS stands for Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome. What are the symptoms of Sleep Apnea? Sleep Apnoea occurs when an obstruction gets in the way of air entering the lungs. These short periods of stopping breathing are generally limited to a less than 10 seconds, and can occur often during the night. Generally, the brain works the sleeping person up when apnoea occurs, often with a snore or snort. How serious is Sleep Apnea? Exp Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Sleep

Type 1 Diabetes And Sleep

IN BRIEF In people with type 1 diabetes, sleep may be disrupted as a result of both behavioral and physiological aspects of diabetes and its management. This sleep disruption may negatively affect disease progression and development of complications. This review highlights key research findings regarding sleep in people with type 1 diabetes. Recent research has increasingly identified sleep as a key process for the maintenance of good cardiovascular and metabolic health. Disturbed sleep patterns (i.e., restriction, deprivation, and fragmentation) in healthy young adults produce alterations in both metabolism and cardiovascular disease risk markers. Sleep restriction refers to reduced amount of total sleep (i.e., sleeping 5 hours instead of 8 hours); sleep deprivation refers to total sleep loss or prevention of sleep; and sleep fragmentation refers to sleep periods that are broken up by multiple awakenings throughout the night. Conditions that accompany type 1 diabetes (e.g., hyperglycemia, glucose variability, and hypoglycemia) may result in sleep disruption. Sleep disruption in people with type 1 diabetes may negatively affect disease progression and the development of complications. Thus, the purpose of this review is to summarize the relevant recent research on sleep in people with type 1 diabetes. Sleep Quality and Sleep Architecture (Structure of Sleep) Children (1) and adults (2) with type 1 diabetes subjectively report poorer sleep quality than healthy control subjects. Objective measures based on polysomnography (PSG) demonstrate that children with type 1 diabetes spend more time in stage 2 (lighter) sleep and less time in stage 3 (deep) sleep compared to healthy children (3). Young adults with type 1 diabetes also exhibit more stage 2 sleep and tend to have les Continue reading >>

The Link Between Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

The Link Between Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

The American Diabetes Association estimates that nearly 30 million Americans live with diabetes. Even more concerning, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. The condition can be caused by an autoimmune problem, where the body attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin to keep blood sugar levels in check. This is known as type 1 diabetes. Or, the condition can be type 2 diabetes which arises from insulin resistance–where the body doesn’t respond to insulin and blood sugar remains at abnormal levels. Type 2 diabetes is more common and is not an autoimmune disease but rather a “lifestyle disease” once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes. There is no cure for type 2 diabetes, but it can be managed and prevented. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, high blood pressure and heart disease, but recent research has pinpointed another condition that is linked as well: sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is more than just an issue with sleep quality. Sleep apnea is the interruption of breathing, typically caused when tissue in the back of the throat collapses into the airway, blocking the breath, and is associated with a host of health issues. Experts have grown certain that the disorder increases cardiovascular (heart) risk, for example. There’s also mounting evidence that sleep apnea may contribute to problems like insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes. “If you have hypertension (high blood pressure), you’re more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea; and if you have sleep apnea, you are more likely to have hypertension,”says Said Mostafavi, M.D., the Chief Medical Officer for Advanced Sleep Medicine Services, Inc. and a sleep specialist. “In the same way, if you have diabetes, you’re mor Continue reading >>

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Common In Type 1 Diabetes

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Common In Type 1 Diabetes

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Common in Type 1 Diabetes According to a Medscape news report, a new study finds that obstructive sleep apnea is common in individuals with type 1 diabetes and is linked toabnormal glycemia and microvascular complications. The link between type 1 diabetes and OSA has been reported in three previous small trials, but this study of 90 adults with type 1 diabetes is the largest such trial to date and the first to use both continuous glucose monitoring and sleep studies to investigate the relationship between OSA and both hypo- and hyperglycemic variation, Dr Meyer explained. In the study, OSA was particularly common among those with long disease duration and was associated with higher rates of diabetes complications, including retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy. The main message for clinicians is to think of OSA in type 1 patients with a long duration of diabetes. With the design of our study we cant say check at 10 or 15 years, but in my opinion if [a patient has] a duration of more than 20 years, its important to check for OSA, Dr Meyer toldMedscape Medical Newsin an interview. Continue reading >>

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