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Sleep Apnea And Diabetes Connection

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

According to National Sleep Foundation, 63% of American population do not get enough daily sleep. Do you also know that most people who suffer from diabetes often have poor sleeping habits? This includes irregular sleeping schedule, difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep. And although little has been mentioned about caregivers and parents of diabetes patients, they are more likely to acquire poor sleeping habits and have a higher tendency to suffer from sleeping problems and consequently develop Type 2 diabetes themselves. So if you have diabetes or are currently caring for someone who has diabetes, this article will educate you more about how sleeping disorders can affect your health and how you can get better sleep. This article will cover the following topics: Relationship Between Sleep and Diabetes Your health and sleep go hand in hand. When you do not sleep enough, your body does not get the needed time to repair. As a result, you tend to be unfocused and irritable, and you suddenly have the urge to eat. If this scenario sounds too familiar to you, maybe you should rethink about the relationship between sleep and your diabetes. The Missing Link — Hormones Sleep plays a crucial role in restoring our body cells. Under healthy conditions, after eating, the pancreas secretes insulin to signal fat cells and muscles to absorb the glucose from food to be used for energy creation and prevents the body from using fat as energy source. This chain of reaction causes the blood glucose levels to resume normal. And to prevent the individual from feeling hungry, the body produces the hormone leptin to depresses the appetite. However, when it comes to diabetes individuals, the muscle and fat cells fails to respond to insulin. This causes a high glucose level in the bloodst Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Sleep Apnea & Diabetes

The Connection Between Sleep Apnea & Diabetes

The Connection Between Sleep Apnea & Diabetes American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Daniel Einhorn, MD, FACP, FACE, has indicated to Physicians Weekly that he has or has had no financial interests to report. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Daniel Einhorn, MD, FACP, FACE, has indicated to Physicians Weekly that he has or has had no financial interests to report. Asking patients questions about their sleep and treating sleep apnea may improve diabetes control while offering the added benefit of enhancing quality of life. In clinical research, sleep disordered breathing conditions like obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been associated with insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. OSA is typically characterized by loud snoring and pauses in breathing while sleeping. Excess weight is often considered the cause of OSA because fat deposits around the upper airways obstruct breathing. Obesity has been identified as a significant risk factor for OSA as well as diabetes, but studies suggest that obesity status is not the only determinant. Also, diabetes itself is a major risk factor and complication of OSA. In addition to causing poor sleep quality and daytime sleepiness, OSA has other important clinical consequences, including an increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Despite the significant burden that OSA and other sleep disorders has on patients, these health problems are not well recognized by clinicians. OSA is commonly found in people with type 2 diabetes, but clinicians need to ask their patients about daytime drowsiness, snoring, and impaired sleep symptoms in order to identify the problem, says Daniel Einhorn, MD, FACP, FACE. He notes that the link between OSA and type 2 diabetes has important clinical, epidem Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

The Relationship Between Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

November is National Diabetes Month. Who knew that diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) could be related? People who have both do, and are probably the most compliant with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy because they know its benefit to both conditions. Consider this: Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic. Meanwhile, sleep-disordered breathing often remains undiagnosed and, therefore, untreated. A correlation between both conditions is notsurprising, as today's research confirms. Which Came First: OSA or Diabetes? Researchers have known about this relationship for more than two decades. A key study led by Rees in 1981 reported the high incidence of sleep breathing disorders in diabetics. Many studies since then have shown independent associations between sleep apnea, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Today, insulin resistance is a well-known risk factor for diabetes. But can one cause the other?It's complicated. Having diabetes could cause sleep breathing problems. Having OSA can lead to diabetes. Many diabetics are also obese, and obesity itself can lead to OSA. On the other hand, a person may not be diabetic at all, or live in a pre-diabetic state, and they may not even be obese. Should that person develop OSA, they are more likely to also develop diabetes if they don't treat their OSA. What Statistics Show According to Dr. Osama Hamdy, director at the Inpatient Diabetes Program at Boston's Joslin Diabetes Center, OSA affects about half of all diabetics. A 2014 study in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine shows that for nondiabetics, 1 in 3 patients with severe OSA will also develop diabetes. Other studies show that when the severity of OSA increases, insulin resistance and glucose intolerance increase as well. Continue reading >>

Considering The Relationship Between Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Apnea

Considering The Relationship Between Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Apnea

Considering the Relationship Between Type 2 Diabetes and Sleep Apnea Sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes are serious conditions that can potentially cause life-threatening complications. Learning about the relationship between the two can help sufferers of the conditions to successfully manage them. Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep disorder that causes sufferers to experience breathing interruptions throughout the night, which can cause symptoms such as loud snoring and sudden wakefulness. OSA can also cause serious health complications, including a higher risk of heart disease and heart-related problems, as well as type 2 diabetes. Although the disorder can affect anyone, those who are overweight or have a family history of sleep apnea, have a higher chance of developing OSA. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the body elevates blood glucose (sugar) levels. The body fails to use insulin properly or becomes resistant to the effects of it. Initially, the pancreas produces extra insulin to stabilize the levels, but in the long-term, it can’t produce enough insulin to maintain them. Having one or more risk factors — such as being overweight, being inactive or having a family history of diabetes — can increase the chance of contracting the disease. Relationship Between Sleep Apnea and Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes affects roughly 25.6 million people in the U.S. who are 20 years old and over, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and between 90 to 95 percent of these cases are type 2 diabetes. Around seven in 10 adults with type 2 diabetes also suffer from obstructive sleep apnea. In fact, the prevalence of sleep apnea can be as high as 72 percent in those with diabetes. When OSA is poorly managed, it makes Continue reading >>

Sleep Apnea In Kids: A Total Nightmare

Sleep Apnea In Kids: A Total Nightmare

Once linked primarily to overweight older men with Type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea can affect kids with diabetes, too. If your child snores, is a restless sleeper, or is sleepy during the daytime, talk to your doctor or diabetes care team about getting your child a sleep test. If your child with diabetes sleeps restlessly or snores at night, it may be a good idea to have him or her checked for sleep apnea. It can make a difference in their health, as poor sleep quality is directly linked to elevated blood glucose levels and many other complications. If left undiagnosed, sleep apnea can have a wide-ranging impact on diabetic kids, including problems with good glucose control, a tendency to put on weight or a general failure to thrive. A 2012 University of Arizona study of 50 children with Type 1 diabetes found a direct connection between less restful sleep and daytime fluctuations in blood glucose levels among those studied. Those with sleep apnea also had much higher blood sugar levels overall, the study concluded. Dr. Michelle Perfect, the lead investigator, believes theres a strong connection between blood sugar fluctuations and sleep quality. Writing in the academic journal Sleep, Dr. Perfect observed that despite adhering to recommendations for good diabetic health, many youth with type 1 diabetes have difficulty maintaining control of their blood sugarsWe found that it could be due to abnormalities in sleep, such as daytime sleepiness, lighter sleep and sleep apnea. All of these make it more difficult to have good blood sugar control. Unfortunately, an estimated 80% to 90% of sleep apnea cases arent diagnosed. Thats too bad because, unlike diabetes, sleep apnea can be cured, or at least controlled, quite effectively once diagnosed. Sleep, particularly dee Continue reading >>

The Diabetes-sleep Apnea Link

The Diabetes-sleep Apnea Link

By Marianne Wait Maybe your bedmate has noticed that you snore loudly and stop breathing for seconds or even minutes at a time, and then start again with a loud snort or gasp. Or perhaps you’re inexplicably tired during the day despite getting a solid seven or eight hours of sleep. If this sounds like you, you may have sleep apnea. What is Sleep Apnea? People with sleep apnea stop breathing or have periods of very shallow breathing while sleeping, usually multiple times a night. It’s no wonder they wake up exhausted. The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea, in which the airway collapses or becomes blocked during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnea is more common in people who are overweight, but it can affect anyone. Central sleep apnea is less common. It occurs if the area of the brain that controls breathing fails to send the right signals to the breathing muscles. Symptoms of Sleep Apnea Most people who have sleep apnea don’t know they have it. Other signs and symptoms include morning headaches, dry mouth, or a sore throat; difficulty concentrating; irritability or depression; and waking up often to urinate. If your doctor suspects sleep apnea, he or she may refer you to a sleep specialist. That expert may prescribe a sleep study, either at home using portable monitors or in a sleep lab, to help make the diagnosis. How Diabetes and Sleep Apnea are Connected People with type 2 diabetes are at much higher than average risk for sleep apnea—and in a vicious cycle, having untreated sleep apnea can raise blood glucose levels. On the positive side, if you have type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea, treating your sleep apnea may help you manage your blood sugar levels and could even improve your insulin sensitivity, according to the American Academy of Sl Continue reading >>

The Sleep Apnea-diabetes Connection

The Sleep Apnea-diabetes Connection

David Mendosa / @davidmendosa , Patient Expert People who have diabetes and those who have sleep apnea have several things in common. Theres no cure for either condition, but both can be controlled. The connection is even closer. About 40 percent of all men who have type 2 diabetes also have sleep apnea, according to research that Daniel Einhorn, the director of the Sharp Diabetes Treatment and Research Center in San Diego, and three associates presented at the 65th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association in poster 2415 . They found that the proportion went up to 61 percent among men older than 65. Another similarity is that a lot of people with both conditions dont know that they have it. The U.S. government has told us for years that one-third of all Americans with diabetes havent been diagnosed yet. Thats a lot, but its even higher with sleep apnea. Fully 93 percent of women and 82 percent of men with moderate to severe sleep apnea havent been diagnosed, according to a study in the journal Sleep . The consequences of uncontrolled diabetes and of sleep apnea can also be much more severe than most people might guess. How important can it be to have "a little sugar" in the blood and too little sleep? Those of us who have diabetes know how important it is to keep our blood glucose levels in check. But few of us recognize the importance of sleep apnea symptoms. The immediate result of untreated sleep apnea is constant fatigue. It can also lead to poor concentration, depression, and lack of energy. Unless treated, it reduces our insulin sensitivity, according to research by German scientists. The consequences of untreated sleep apnea can also include high blood pressure, heart attacks, strokes, and accidents while driving and at work, the National Institu Continue reading >>

The Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Apnea Connection

The Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Apnea Connection

People with type 2 diabetes are at risk for sleep apnea, a disorder that's marked by pauses in breathing during sleep. If you have type 2 diabetes, there’s another condition that you should be aware of: sleep apnea, a disorder in which people experience pauses in their breathing throughout the night, possibly for one minute or more. In fact, according to a study published in 2013 in Family Medicine, people with type 2 diabetes can have a nearly 50-50 chance of being diagnosed with this sleep disorder. That’s a problem, since sleep apnea can worsen diabetes symptoms and lead to problems like high blood pressure, heart disease, or even stroke, says David Marrero, PhD, president of healthcare and education at the American Diabetes Association and director of the Diabetes Translational Research Center at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis. “Untreated sleep apnea is associated with increases in glucose and poor quality of life stemming from chronic fatigue,” says Dr. Marrero. “It’s also associated with cardiovascular disease, which is why it’s so important for people to get their sleep apnea diagnosed and treated.” Sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes often coexist because of shared risk factors like obesity. According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, the more severe the untreated sleep apnea in a person with type 2 diabetes, the poorer their levels of glucose control. Read on to learn more about sleep apnea and how you can treat it effectively. Sleep Apnea: It's More Than Just Snoring Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder that’s characterized by pauses in breathing. These episodes, called apneas, can wake the sleeper as he or she gasps for air, which can lead to poor sleep and chronic tiredness. The most common type of sleep apnea is Continue reading >>

Obstructive Sleep Apnea And Type 2 Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Obstructive Sleep Apnea And Type 2 Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Type 2 Diabetes: Is There a Link? 1Respiratory Division, Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada 2Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Edited by: Sigrid Veasey, University of Pennsylvania, USA Reviewed by: Vsevolod Polotsky, Johns Hopkins University, USA; Sigrid Veasey, University of Pennsylvania, USA *Correspondence: Sushmita Pamidi, Respiratory Division, McGill University Health Centre, Room L4.05, 687 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A1A1. e-mail: [email protected] This article was submitted to Frontiers in Sleep and Chronobiology, a specialty of Frontiers in Neurology. Received 2012 Jun 16; Accepted 2012 Jul 24. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and subject to any copyright notices concerning any third-party graphics etc. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic illness that is increasing in epidemic proportions worldwide. Major factors contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes include obesity and poor lifestyle habits (e.g., excess dietary intake and limited physical activity). Despite the proven efficacy of lifestyle interventions and the use of multiple pharmacological agents, the economic and public health burden of type 2 diabetes remains substantial. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a treatable sleep disorder that is pervasive among overweight and obese adults, who represent about two thirds of the U.S. population today. An ever-growing number of studies have shown that OSA is associated with insulin resistance, glucose intolerance Continue reading >>

The Link Between Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

The Link Between Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

The American Diabetes Association estimates that nearly 30 million Americans live with diabetes. Even more concerning, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. The condition can be caused by an autoimmune problem, where the body attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin to keep blood sugar levels in check. This is known as type 1 diabetes. Or, the condition can be type 2 diabetes which arises from insulin resistance–where the body doesn’t respond to insulin and blood sugar remains at abnormal levels. Type 2 diabetes is more common and is not an autoimmune disease but rather a “lifestyle disease” once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes. There is no cure for type 2 diabetes, but it can be managed and prevented. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, high blood pressure and heart disease, but recent research has pinpointed another condition that is linked as well: sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is more than just an issue with sleep quality. Sleep apnea is the interruption of breathing, typically caused when tissue in the back of the throat collapses into the airway, blocking the breath, and is associated with a host of health issues. Experts have grown certain that the disorder increases cardiovascular (heart) risk, for example. There’s also mounting evidence that sleep apnea may contribute to problems like insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes. “If you have hypertension (high blood pressure), you’re more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea; and if you have sleep apnea, you are more likely to have hypertension,”says Said Mostafavi, M.D., the Chief Medical Officer for Advanced Sleep Medicine Services, Inc. and a sleep specialist. “In the same way, if you have diabetes, you’re mor Continue reading >>

Sleep Apnea-diabetes Link Confirmed In Large Study

Sleep Apnea-diabetes Link Confirmed In Large Study

Sleep Apnea-Diabetes Link Confirmed in Large Study Severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase a person's risk of developing diabetes by 30% or more, according to an article published online June 6 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. Now that that link has been confirmed in a large trial with a long follow-up period, clinicians may be able to intervene and take diabetes prevention measures for patients with OSA who have not yet developed the disease, researchers write. Tetyana Kendzerska, MD, PhD, from the Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and colleagues analyzed provincial health data on 8678 adults without diabetes who underwent a diagnostic sleep study for suspected OSA between 1994 and 2010. The researchers followed the patients through May 2011. The study population had a median age of 48 years, and 62% of patients were men. Of the 8678 patients who underwent the sleep study, 1017 (11.7%) developed diabetes during a median of 67 months of follow-up, which translates to a cumulative incidence of 9.1% at 5 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.4% - 9.8%). Incidence came to 7.5% (95% CI, 6.3%-8.6%) for patients with mild OSA, 9.9% (95% CI, 8.3%-11.4%) for moderate OSA, and 14.9% (95% CI, 13.2%-16.6%) for severe OSA. The researchers analyzed all OSA-related variables, including total sleep time, amount of rapid eye movement sleep, total awakenings, oxygen saturation, and heart rate. They also adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, waist circumference, and self-reported tobacco and alcohol use. They developed an apnea-hypoxia index on the basis of the number of complete apneas and partial apneas (hypopneas). The apnea-hypoxia index ranged from less than 5 for no OSA dia Continue reading >>

What You Should Know: Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Apnea

What You Should Know: Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Apnea

What You Should Know: Type 2 Diabetes and Sleep Apnea Filed under: Uncategorized sleepdunwoodyteam @ 2:31 pm Its well-recognized in medical circles that obstructive sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes are connected. In fact, one study published in Family Medicine found that people with type 2 diabetes have a nearly 50 percent chance of also having the sleep disorder. But this connection is lesser known among the general public, it seems. Its a problem that is mirrored by the lack of awareness surrounding sleep apnea overall, as the American Sleep Apnea Association estimates that 80 percent of moderate to severe cases are undiagnosed. Today, our goal is to dispel some of that ambiguity. Well dive into the links between the two disorders and what symptoms to look out for if you or a loved one have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. How Diabetes and Sleep Apnea Are Connected The human body is a collection of interlocking systems, all working together and influencing each other every moment of every day. This is why, in many cases, an issue within one part of the body can lead to issues in another part. This fact is especially notable when it comes to obstructive sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes, as the two conditions share many common symptoms, such as: Shared comorbidities like cardiovascular disease Sleep apnea sufferers experience a cessation in breathing during the night, which causes a tremendous amount of stress to the body and makes the functions that control blood sugar levels far less effective. On the flip side, diabetics also have trouble sleeping due to high glucose levels at night, which means frequent trips to the bathroom and a lack of quality sleep. Additionally, poor lifestyle habits (like not getting enough exercise and excess dietary intake) are risk facto Continue reading >>

Sleep Apnea Increases Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Sleep Apnea Increases Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Years of research have suggested that there is a connection between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Type 2 diabetes. Now, the largest study investigating the conditions to date has demonstrated a link between the severity of a person’s OSA and his risk of developing Type 2. OSA is a condition in which breathing stops for 10 seconds or more during sleep, sometimes hundreds of times a night. The disorder affects approximately 18 million people in the United States, and research has shown that the condition is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular death. To determine whether OSA increases the risk of developing diabetes, researchers from the University of Toronto looked at 8,678 adults with suspected OSA who underwent a sleep study between 1994 and 2010. The severity of each person’s sleep apnea was evaluated using a measurement known as the apnea-hypoapnea index (AHI), which indicates the number of times a person stops breathing or breathes irregularly each hour. Based on the results, the study subjects were placed into one of four OSA categories — none, mild, moderate, or severe — and were then followed through May 2011 to examine whether they went on to develop diabetes. Over the course of the follow-up period, 1,017 (11.7%) of the participants developed Type 2 diabetes. After adjusting for risk factors known to increase a person’s chances of developing the condition, including age, sex, body-mass index, neck circumference, smoking, and income status, people with severe OSA were found to have a 30% higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than people without OSA. Additionally, those with mild or moderate OSA were found to have a 23% increased risk of developing Type 2 compared to those without OSA. Additional risk factors for diabetes included e Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep

Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep

People who have diabetes often have poor sleep habits, including difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep. Some people with diabetes get too much sleep, while others have problems getting enough sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, 63% of American adults do not get enough sleep needed for good health, safety, and optimum performance. There are several causes of sleep problems for people with type 2 diabetes, including obstructive sleep apnea, pain or discomfort, restless legs syndrome, the need to go to the bathroom, and other problems associated with type 2 diabetes. Sleep apnea involves pauses in breathing during sleep. The periods of stopped breathing are called apneas, which are caused by an obstruction of the upper airway. Apneas may be interrupted by a brief arousal that does not awaken you completely -- you often do not even realize that your sleep was disturbed. Yet if your sleep was measured in a sleep laboratory, technicians would record changes in the brain waves that are characteristic of awakening. Sleep apnea results in low oxygen levels in the blood because the blockages prevent air from getting to the lungs. The low oxygen levels also affect brain and heart function. Up to two-thirds of the people who have sleep apnea are overweight. Sleep apnea alters our sleep cycle and stages of sleep. Some studies have linked altered sleep stages with a decrease in growth hormone, which plays a key role in body composition such as body fat, muscle, and abdominal fat. Researchers have found a possible link between sleep apnea and the development of diabetes and insulin resistance (the inability of the body to use insulin). Peripheral neuropathy, or damage to the nerves in the feet and legs, is another cause of sleep disruption. This nerve damage can c Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sleep Apnea: Risks, Signs & Symptoms

Diabetes And Sleep Apnea: Risks, Signs & Symptoms

Diabetes and Sleep Apnea Ever hear of the saying “which came first, the chicken or the egg?” Well, sleep apnea and diabetes are like that. Do you find yourself tired during the day and reaching for that snack for some energy? Snacking leads to blood sugar spikes which can lead to Type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes and are carrying a few extra pounds, you have an increased risk of developing sleep apnea. It is estimated that 40 percent of people who have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have diabetes. In people who have diabetes, the prevalence of OSA may be up to 23 percent, and diabetics who have some form of sleep-disordered breathing may be as high as 58 percent. How It All Adds Up A large, 16-year trial conducted by the University of Toronto studied sleep apnea persons and their potential risk of developing diabetes. It was found that people with severe sleep apnea were found to have a 30 percent higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than people without OSA. Those with mild or moderate OSA had a 23 percent increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes compared to those without OSA. According to Dr. Ralph Pascualy, a sleep physician in Seattle, Washington, sleep apnea is a major contributor to the development of diabetes. Fifty percent of men with Type 2 diabetes have sleep apnea, compared to an estimated 4 percent of middle-aged men overall. Type 2 diabetes involves the processing of glucose. Our bodies use glucose as fuel to function properly. Glucose is a type of sugar, a component of many carbohydrates. The pancreas produces insulin which absorbs the glucose in the bloodstream. When the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to absorb the glucose in the blood or the body cells cannot respond to the glucose in the bloodstream, diabetes develops. Higher bloo Continue reading >>

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