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Sleep Apnea And Blood Sugar

Diabetes And Sleep Apnea: Risks, Signs & Symptoms

Diabetes And Sleep Apnea: Risks, Signs & Symptoms

Diabetes and Sleep Apnea Ever hear of the saying “which came first, the chicken or the egg?” Well, sleep apnea and diabetes are like that. Do you find yourself tired during the day and reaching for that snack for some energy? Snacking leads to blood sugar spikes which can lead to Type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes and are carrying a few extra pounds, you have an increased risk of developing sleep apnea. It is estimated that 40 percent of people who have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have diabetes. In people who have diabetes, the prevalence of OSA may be up to 23 percent, and diabetics who have some form of sleep-disordered breathing may be as high as 58 percent. How It All Adds Up A large, 16-year trial conducted by the University of Toronto studied sleep apnea persons and their potential risk of developing diabetes. It was found that people with severe sleep apnea were found to have a 30 percent higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than people without OSA. Those with mild or moderate OSA had a 23 percent increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes compared to those without OSA. According to Dr. Ralph Pascualy, a sleep physician in Seattle, Washington, sleep apnea is a major contributor to the development of diabetes. Fifty percent of men with Type 2 diabetes have sleep apnea, compared to an estimated 4 percent of middle-aged men overall. Type 2 diabetes involves the processing of glucose. Our bodies use glucose as fuel to function properly. Glucose is a type of sugar, a component of many carbohydrates. The pancreas produces insulin which absorbs the glucose in the bloodstream. When the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to absorb the glucose in the blood or the body cells cannot respond to the glucose in the bloodstream, diabetes develops. Higher bloo Continue reading >>

Sleep Apnea And Type 2 Diabetes:

Sleep Apnea And Type 2 Diabetes:

The epidemic of diabetes in the United States is being fueled by multiple medical, social, and demographic forces. Among those forces is sleep apnea , which is now recognized as a major contributor to the development of diabetes. In sleep apnea, people stop breathing for periods of 10 seconds or more while theyre asleep, sometimes hundreds of times a night. These periods without breathing, known as apneas, both disrupt sleep and lower the level of oxygen in the blood. When breathing restarts after an apnea, it is generally with a loud gasp or snort. People with sleep apnea are more than twice as likely to have diabetes as those who dont. In addition, 50% of men with Type 2 diabetes have sleep apnea, compared to an estimated 4% of middle-aged men overall. Several recent studies have suggested that insulin sensitivitythe bodys ability to respond to insulindecreases as sleep apnea severity increases. A high body-mass index (BMI, a measure of body mass that takes both height and weight into consideration) is a risk factor for both sleep apnea and diabetes. A number of mechanisms are thought to be involved in the interaction between sleep apnea and diabetes, including the following: Stress response. Repeated arousals from sleep and interruptions in the delivery of oxygen to the bodys tissues caused by sleep apnea lead to the stress, or fight or flight, response. In the short term, the stress response causes increased heart rate and increased blood pressure. When it occurs repeatedly over time, it is a risk factor in the development of chronic high blood pressure, insulin resistance (one of the hallmarks of Type 2 diabetes), and cardiovascular disease. Increased cortisol levels. Sleep deprivation or fragmentation may increase blood levels of cortisol (a stress hormone), whic Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

November is National Diabetes Month and Alaska Sleep Clinic is dedicating this month’s blog posts to raising awareness for diabetic complications and how they correlate with sleep disorders and overall tiredness. SLEEP PROBLEMS AND SNORING MAY PREDICT DIABETES Studies have shown that individuals who consistently have a bad night's sleep are more likely to develop conditions linked to diabetes and heart disease. Loud snoring sleepers (many of whom may have sleep apnea), compared to quiet sleepers, double (2x) their risks of developing certain types of metabolic syndrome(s); including diabetes, obesity, and high blood pressure. This likelihood also increased dramatically to 80% in those who found it difficult to fall asleep and to 70% for those who woke up feeling not as refreshed. Blood Sugar and Sleep Problems Sleep can affect your blood sugar levels, and your blood glucose control can also affect your sleep. It’s a vicious cycle. As the amount of sleep decreases, blood sugar increases, escalating the issue. Lack of sleep has been shown to increase blood sugar levels and the risk of diabetic issues. Higher blood sugar means less long-lasting fat metabolism in the night and even less sleep. Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine found that people who slept less than 6 hours a night had more blood sugar complications compared to those who received 8 hours of sleep. HIGH BLOOD SUGAR - HYPERGLYCEMIA Sleepless and restless nights hurt more than your mood and energy; it is a form of chronic stress on the body. When there is added stress on your body this results in having higher blood sugar levels. When researchers restricted people with type-1 diabetes to just 4 hours of sleep, their sensitivity to insulin was reduced by 20% compared to that after a full nig Continue reading >>

Cpap Improves Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetics With Sleep Apnea

Cpap Improves Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetics With Sleep Apnea

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Lynn Celmer, 630-737-9700, ext. 9364, [email protected] DARIEN, IL – A new study from the Sleep, Metabolism and Health Center at the University of Chicago suggests that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy reduces glucose levels and improves morning glycemic control in type 2 diabetics who have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Results show that one week of optimal CPAP use lowered average 24-hour glucose levels and improved post-breakfast glucose response. The dawn phenomenon, an early-morning increase in blood sugar in people who have type 2 diabetes, also was reduced by 45 percent as a result of CPAP therapy. “Our study shows that CPAP treatment of sleep apnea across the entire night can improve glucose control and may in some patients have as much of an effect as an oral anti-diabetic medication,” said lead author Esra Tasali, MD, assistant professor of medicine, pulmonary and critical care medicine at the University of Chicago Department of Medicine. The research abstract was published recently in an online supplement of the journal SLEEP, and Tasali will present the findings Wednesday, June 5, in Baltimore, Md., at SLEEP 2013, the 27th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC. The study group comprised nine type 2 diabetics who received one week of CPAP therapy, spending each night in a sleep laboratory. Optimum CPAP adherence while sleeping for eight hours in bed was achieved by continuous supervision. Before and after the one-week treatment, subjects consumed standardized meals and provided blood samples at 15 to 30 minute intervals for 24 hours. None of the patients were on insulin. Tasali noted that there is a strong link between sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes, which is one of the most pr Continue reading >>

The Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Apnea Connection

The Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Apnea Connection

People with type 2 diabetes are at risk for sleep apnea, a disorder that's marked by pauses in breathing during sleep. If you have type 2 diabetes, there’s another condition that you should be aware of: sleep apnea, a disorder in which people experience pauses in their breathing throughout the night, possibly for one minute or more. In fact, according to a study published in 2013 in Family Medicine, people with type 2 diabetes can have a nearly 50-50 chance of being diagnosed with this sleep disorder. That’s a problem, since sleep apnea can worsen diabetes symptoms and lead to problems like high blood pressure, heart disease, or even stroke, says David Marrero, PhD, president of healthcare and education at the American Diabetes Association and director of the Diabetes Translational Research Center at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis. “Untreated sleep apnea is associated with increases in glucose and poor quality of life stemming from chronic fatigue,” says Dr. Marrero. “It’s also associated with cardiovascular disease, which is why it’s so important for people to get their sleep apnea diagnosed and treated.” Sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes often coexist because of shared risk factors like obesity. According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, the more severe the untreated sleep apnea in a person with type 2 diabetes, the poorer their levels of glucose control. Read on to learn more about sleep apnea and how you can treat it effectively. Sleep Apnea: It's More Than Just Snoring Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder that’s characterized by pauses in breathing. These episodes, called apneas, can wake the sleeper as he or she gasps for air, which can lead to poor sleep and chronic tiredness. The most common type of sleep apnea is Continue reading >>

The Link Between Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

The Link Between Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

The American Diabetes Association estimates that nearly 30 million Americans live with diabetes. Even more concerning, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. The condition can be caused by an autoimmune problem, where the body attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin to keep blood sugar levels in check. This is known as type 1 diabetes. Or, the condition can be type 2 diabetes which arises from insulin resistance–where the body doesn’t respond to insulin and blood sugar remains at abnormal levels. Type 2 diabetes is more common and is not an autoimmune disease but rather a “lifestyle disease” once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes. There is no cure for type 2 diabetes, but it can be managed and prevented. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, high blood pressure and heart disease, but recent research has pinpointed another condition that is linked as well: sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is more than just an issue with sleep quality. Sleep apnea is the interruption of breathing, typically caused when tissue in the back of the throat collapses into the airway, blocking the breath, and is associated with a host of health issues. Experts have grown certain that the disorder increases cardiovascular (heart) risk, for example. There’s also mounting evidence that sleep apnea may contribute to problems like insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes. “If you have hypertension (high blood pressure), you’re more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea; and if you have sleep apnea, you are more likely to have hypertension,”says Said Mostafavi, M.D., the Chief Medical Officer for Advanced Sleep Medicine Services, Inc. and a sleep specialist. “In the same way, if you have diabetes, you’re mor Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

The Relationship Between Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

November is National Diabetes Month. Who knew that diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) could be related? People who have both do, and are probably the most compliant with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy because they know its benefit to both conditions. Consider this: Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic. Meanwhile, sleep-disordered breathing often remains undiagnosed and, therefore, untreated. A correlation between both conditions is notsurprising, as today's research confirms. Which Came First: OSA or Diabetes? Researchers have known about this relationship for more than two decades. A key study led by Rees in 1981 reported the high incidence of sleep breathing disorders in diabetics. Many studies since then have shown independent associations between sleep apnea, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Today, insulin resistance is a well-known risk factor for diabetes. But can one cause the other?It's complicated. Having diabetes could cause sleep breathing problems. Having OSA can lead to diabetes. Many diabetics are also obese, and obesity itself can lead to OSA. On the other hand, a person may not be diabetic at all, or live in a pre-diabetic state, and they may not even be obese. Should that person develop OSA, they are more likely to also develop diabetes if they don't treat their OSA. What Statistics Show According to Dr. Osama Hamdy, director at the Inpatient Diabetes Program at Boston's Joslin Diabetes Center, OSA affects about half of all diabetics. A 2014 study in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine shows that for nondiabetics, 1 in 3 patients with severe OSA will also develop diabetes. Other studies show that when the severity of OSA increases, insulin resistance and glucose intolerance increase as well. Continue reading >>

Sleep Apnea: A Hidden Enemy In Diabetes

Sleep Apnea: A Hidden Enemy In Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you may also have obstructive sleep apnea, or OSA. In fact, up to 80% of people with Type 2 diabetes have some form of OSA. After working with sleep doctors for many years, I knew a lot about OSA. But when I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, the whole subject took on greater importance. Why do I call OSA a hidden enemy? Because it is easy to have the condition for years without being aware of it. Like diabetes, it can sneak up on you. One connection to diabetes is that OSA may worsen insulin resistance. Sleep doctors have seen proof: When OSA is treated, their patients’ blood sugar levels improve. What is apnea? If others say you snore, stop breathing, and gasp for air or choke while sleeping, you may have OSA. It is caused by a relaxed throat and tongue that close up your airway, making you unable to breathe. If your tongue is large or if you have fat deposits in the airway or around your neck and abdomen, sleep apnea can be severe. This is why OSA is so common among obese people. Not being able to breathe for seconds and even minutes puts a strain on your heart. As noted above, it also increases insulin resistance. So you may have high blood pressure and high blood sugar that do not respond to medication as they should. Doctors now understand that lack of deep sleep makes diabetes worse, adding to your body’s stress. OSA contributes to this by forcing you out of deep sleep over and over, sometimes hundreds of times a night as you struggle to breathe. OSA is called a silent killer because it makes you sleepy during the day, which leads to accidents while driving or at work. Also, people with OSA can die in their sleep due to sudden heart attacks, possibly from low oxygen levels or the stress of frequent awakenings. Do you have it? Although o Continue reading >>

Untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Could Worsen Heart Health And Blood Sugar Levels

Untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Could Worsen Heart Health And Blood Sugar Levels

Untreated obstructive sleep apnea could worsen heart health and blood sugar levels Untreated obstructive sleep apnea could worsen heart health and blood sugar levels Proper treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) could have benefits for the heart and blood sugar levels , according to new research. People with OSA, a condition more likely to be experienced by people with type 2 diabetes , often suffer interrupted breathing as a result of airways becoming blocked during sleep . Scientists now say that those who do not use CPAP machines, which help keep airways open, could experience declining heart health and blood sugar control. However, the research team from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, US, say they could not be sure whether their findings applied to people with milder sleep apnea . Lead author Dr Jonathan Jun said it has been for difficult for researchers to conclude whether obesity increases the risk of sleep apnea, or vice versa. That's why in this study they compared patients who were known to regularly use their CPAP machines, and assessed how this effective their health outcomes. A total of 31 people with moderate-to-severe OSA were recruited. They spent two nights in the laboratory, using their CPAP on only one of the nights. The researchers collected blood samples from the participants every 20 minutes while they slept. On the night without CPAP, the patients had low levels of oxygen in their blood, poor sleep and an increased heart rate . Their blood samples showed an increase in the stress hormone cortisol , and fatty acids, while increases were observed in blood pressure and arterial stiffness, indicating a risk of heart problems. "These were obese patients and patients with relatively severe sleep apnea. They also had other medical problems," Continue reading >>

Untreated Sleep Apnea May Worsen Markers Of Heart Health And Diabetes

Untreated Sleep Apnea May Worsen Markers Of Heart Health And Diabetes

Properly treating a common sleep-related breathing disorder may have benefits for the heart and for blood sugar, a new study suggests. If people with obstructive sleep apnea don’t use machines at night to help keep the airway open, measures of their heart health and blood sugar worsen, researchers found. “One of the long-standing debates in our field” is whether sleep apnea causes heart issues and problems with blood sugar “or if they’re just associated,” said the study’s senior author, Jonathan Jun of Johns Hopkins University. In obstructive sleep apnea, the airway intermittently collapses or becomes blocked during sleep. The blocked airway causes pauses in breathing. Some people address this by using CPAP — continuous positive airway pressure — machines at night to keep the airway open. In the past, researchers have tried to directly link sleep apnea with heart health and blood sugar by comparing patients instructed to use CPAP devices with patients instructed to sleep without these machines. But one of the major issues with those studies is that people may not actually use the CPAP machine, Jun said by phone. For the new study, the researchers recruited 31 people with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea who were known to regularly use CPAP machines. The participants slept two nights in a lab, using their CPAP device on only one of the nights. The researchers obtained blood samples while participants slept. “We are looking at real-time changes,” Jun said. “We’re getting blood every 20 minutes.” As reported in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, on the night without CPAP, patients’ obstructive sleep apnea returned. On those nights, the participants had low levels of oxygen in their blood, poor sleep and an increase Continue reading >>

Sleep Apnea Linked To High Blood Sugar

Sleep Apnea Linked To High Blood Sugar

New research indicates that there may be a link between obstructive sleep apnea and high blood sugar. The study, which used data from the European Sleep Apnea Database (ESADA) found that sleep apnea is independently predictive of poor glycemic health regardless of the presence of other factors. The findings were recently published in the European Respiratory Journal. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep disorder that causes the person to stop breathing during sleep. These pauses in breathing are called apneas and they can last from several seconds to 10 minutes or more. Previous research has linked sleep apnea with serious health conditions including diabetes but it can be challenging to isolate the distinct relationship between sleep apnea and other conditions because of commonly co-existing health conditions like obesity that can contribute to the same health problems. The goal of this study was to isolate the relationship between sleep apnea and elevated blood sugar. The team used data from the ESADA to isolate 5,294 participants who had sleep apnea but who did not have diabetes. They looked at their sleep apnea symptoms and gauged the severity of the disorder. They also looked at the level of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in their blood. This shows the average blood sugar level over time. A higher level of HbA1c in the blood indicates problems with blood sugar management. People with diabetes often have higher HbA1c level than people who do not have the disease and increased levels indicate an increased risk for heart disease. Their findings indicate a relationship between the severity of a person’s sleep apnea and their HbA1c levels; the more severe the sleep apnea, the higher the HbA1c level. The same was true on the opposite end; those with the least seve Continue reading >>

Treating Obstructive Sleep Apnea Does Not Improve Blood Sugar

Treating Obstructive Sleep Apnea Does Not Improve Blood Sugar

Fifty percent of people with type 2 diabetes and up to 86% of those who are obese may have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) – breathing pauses during sleep that worsen insulin resistance and boost risk for high blood pressure and heart attacks. But in new research from Australia’s Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, the gold-standard treatment for OSA did not improve blood sugar. The study, published online February 29, 2016 by the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, tracked 298 women and men with fairly well-controlled type 2 diabetes and newly-diagnosed OSA. Half received CPAPs—continuous positive air pressure devices that gently blow air through a face mask to keep airways open during sleep. The other half did not. When researchers checked everyone’s A1c levels 3 months and 6 months later, they found no differences between the two groups. But CPAP users did get two benefits: Less daytime sleepiness and a 3.5-point drop in their diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number in a blood pressure reading, when the heart is resting between beats.) "Many studies have indicated that OSA may contribute towards the development and progression of type 2 diabetes," says lead study author Jonathan Shaw, MD, associate professor and head of population health at Melbourne's Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute. “Our study confirmed many of the established benefits of CPAP, so CPAP remains of value to people with diabetes. However, since we saw no benefit for glucose control, trying to improve glucose control is not a reason on its own to use CPAP or to screen for unrecognized OSA [in people with type 2].” A Tipping Point for Benefits? But another study in the same journal, published online February 24, did find better Continue reading >>

Considering The Relationship Between Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Apnea

Considering The Relationship Between Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Apnea

Considering the Relationship Between Type 2 Diabetes and Sleep Apnea Sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes are serious conditions that can potentially cause life-threatening complications. Learning about the relationship between the two can help sufferers of the conditions to successfully manage them. Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep disorder that causes sufferers to experience breathing interruptions throughout the night, which can cause symptoms such as loud snoring and sudden wakefulness. OSA can also cause serious health complications, including a higher risk of heart disease and heart-related problems, as well as type 2 diabetes. Although the disorder can affect anyone, those who are overweight or have a family history of sleep apnea, have a higher chance of developing OSA. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the body elevates blood glucose (sugar) levels. The body fails to use insulin properly or becomes resistant to the effects of it. Initially, the pancreas produces extra insulin to stabilize the levels, but in the long-term, it can’t produce enough insulin to maintain them. Having one or more risk factors — such as being overweight, being inactive or having a family history of diabetes — can increase the chance of contracting the disease. Relationship Between Sleep Apnea and Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes affects roughly 25.6 million people in the U.S. who are 20 years old and over, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and between 90 to 95 percent of these cases are type 2 diabetes. Around seven in 10 adults with type 2 diabetes also suffer from obstructive sleep apnea. In fact, the prevalence of sleep apnea can be as high as 72 percent in those with diabetes. When OSA is poorly managed, it makes Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health In The News: Treating Sleep Apnea Benefits Blood Sugar & Heart Health

Diabetes Health In The News: Treating Sleep Apnea Benefits Blood Sugar & Heart Health

A study done on obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) shows that treating the disorder can benefit blood sugar levels and heart health. Dr. Jonathan Jun and his team from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore conducted the study, which shows that those who do not regularly use a CPAP machine to assist with breathing may be more at risk of diabetes and heart issues. There were 31 participants in this study, all of whom had at least moderate OSA, used a CPAP machine regularly, and were categorized as obese. This was a change from previous studies in which some participants may not have used a CPAP machine during the study. Researchers had participants sleep for two nights in a lab. During one night, they used a CPAP machine, while they did not the second night. Blood samples were obtained regularly throughout the night, providing real-time data. During the night patients did not use the CPAP, the amount of oxygen in the blood was lower and the levels of sugar, fatty acids, and cortisol were elevated. These results advance the theory that OSA and other conditions may influence diabetes and heart diseases rather than simple obesity. These findings were published in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism on June 8, 2017. I think that it’s safe to say that none of us were happy when we first found out that we had diabetes. The words “you’re a diabetic” or “you have diabetes” can sound like a death sentence and while we … Dear Nadia, Is marijuana used to lower high blood sugar? if so, does this mean I have to refrain from the munchies to get the benefits? Leah Dear Leah: The new Marijuana industry is still at its infancy in terms … Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sleep Apnea: How Sleep Affects Blood Glucose And Diabetes

Diabetes And Sleep Apnea: How Sleep Affects Blood Glucose And Diabetes

Treat Apnea to Control Diabetes? Sleep apnea can affect diabetes control in many ways. Struggling for air may put your body into fight-or-flight mode, releasing stress hormones that can raise blood glucose levels. If you're tired, you won't want to take that walk around the block after lunch. While you're at work, you might keep snacking to stay awake. But can treating sleep apnea lead to better blood glucose control? Arvind Cavale, M.D., an endocrinologist in Feasterville, Pennsylvania, refers about 60 percent of his patients with type 2 diabetes for sleep studies. Cavale says treating sleep apnea reduces insulin resistance, improves alertness and motivation, and leads to more stable blood glucose levels. "We use correction of sleep apnea as a tool in controlling diabetes," he says. Does This Sound Like You? This is not a happy scenario: You're soooo tired. As soon as your head hits the pillow, you're asleep. But a little while later, someone nudges you awake. You go back to sleep. Just as you get into a deep sleep, you're nudged again. Sleep ... nudge ... sleep ... nudge. All night long. The next day, you might wake up with a headache, snap at your family over breakfast, have trouble concentrating at work. Irritability. Car accidents. Depression. High blood pressure. All because of those nightmarish nudges throughout the night. If you have obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA), you're getting those nudges. It's your body fighting for air. And sleep apnea may be one explanation for difficulty in controlling blood glucose and blood pressure levels. With OSA, something partly or completely blocks your airway when you're asleep. It could be your tongue. It could be the soft tissues in the back of your throat relaxing too much. Snoring is a sign that air is being forced p Continue reading >>

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