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Sleep And Diabetes Type 2

Sleep Tied To Type 2 Diabetes Risk In Children, Says Study

Sleep Tied To Type 2 Diabetes Risk In Children, Says Study

Sleep tied to Type 2 diabetes risk in children, says study Children who get more sleep are at lower risk for developing Type 2 diabetes.PHOTO: FREEIMAGES WASHINGTON (BERNAMA) - Children who get more sleep are at lower risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study published on Tuesday (Aug 15) in a USjournal, China's Xinhua news agency reported. For adults, getting too much or not enough sleep both have been linked with adiposity - the amount of body fat in humans - and Type 2 diabetes. In children, more sleep has been tied to lower levels of obesity, but research about Type 2 diabetes risk factors has been scarce, according to The Journal of Pediatrics. To explore possible connections, researchers analysed the body measurements, blood sample results and questionnaire data from 4,525 children of multi-ethnic descent, aged nine to 10, in England. They found that children who slept longer had lower body weight and lower levels of fat mass. Sleep duration was "also inversely related to insulin, insulin resistance and blood glucose", they said. "These findings suggest increasing sleep duration could offer a simple approach to reducing levels of body fat and Type 2 diabetes risk from early life," Professor Christopher Owen, who led the research at St George's, University of London, said in a statement. "Potential benefits associated with increased sleep in childhood may have implications for health in adulthood," Prof Owen said. The researchers did not find an association between sleep duration and cardiovascular risk factors, including blood lipids and blood pressure. This lack suggests "that sleep duration does not alter other cardiovascular risks in early life, other than by increased obesity and metabolic risks which, if sustained or accentuated, take the Continue reading >>

Diabetes – Is It Causing Your Sleep Problems?

Diabetes – Is It Causing Your Sleep Problems?

Diabetes – Is it causing your sleep problems? Adequate sleep and quality sleep are critically important for good health. You can be eating healthy food and exercising regularly, but if you don’t sleep well you are at high risk of developing health problems. For diabetics, good sleep is even more important. If you do not sleep well, your blood sugar tends to rise. Lack of sleep is known to worsen insulin resistance. That means it causes insulin to be less effective in your body. If insulin doesn’t work as well, it has poor control over your blood sugar, and it is likely to rise. Unfortunately, having diabetes can create its own set of sleeping troubles. For various reasons, diabetics are often more prone to insomnia. Sometimes sleeping problems are what prompts an undiagnosed diabetic to visit their GP in the first place. A blood test for glucose then leads to a diagnosis of diabetes. Here are some common sleep problems in diabetics and ways to overcome them: Sleep apnea This is one of the most prevalent problems in type 2 diabetics who are overweight. Sleep apnea is an extremely common cause of waking up feeling unrefreshed, and being tired all day. It is quite a common cause of motor vehicle accidents as people may fall asleep at the wheel. People who get sleep anpea are more likely to carry excess weight on their upper body – torso and neck area. When adipose tissue (fat) encroaches the upper respiratory tract and throat, it impedes the flow of air, particularly when a person is laying down. Sleep apnea is also more common in people who drink alcohol (particularly in the evening) and people with a blocked nose or sinuses. Sleep apnea significantly raises the risk of high blood pressure and dementia. If you are overweight and suffering with significant fatigue, Continue reading >>

Sleep For Diabetes

Sleep For Diabetes

According to recent research, sleep is as important for health as diet and exercise. Lack of sleep raises blood sugars and insulin resistance. With enough sleep, our bodies can heal and repair. Without sleep, they get sicker. Poets have celebrated the importance of sleep for centuries. Shakespeare called it the “Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course, Chief nourisher in life’s feast.” Now science is catching up. We’re finding that life is tough, and to function, our bodies and minds need rest. Sleep gives our brains time to learn. According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, people remember a day or a lesson better if they have a good night’s sleep. Sleep gives our bodies time to repair. Our immune systems can work better when our muscles, brains, and digestive system aren’t competing with them for resources. So if your blood vessels or your heart or kidneys need healing (which is the case for many of us), you need to sleep. Sleep deprivation is associated with raised levels of the stress hormone cortisol. Cortisol triggers insulin resistance. Sleep deprivation also lowers levels of the “I’m OK” hormone leptin, which controls appetite. It raises levels of the “eat more” hormone ghrelin. So less sleep leads to more eating and probable weight gain. Sleep gives us a break from endless mental stress. From a spiritual point of view, sleep may be like meditation — it’s a time when our minds can be free of the world’s stresses and our own craziness. Then we can see life and our place in it better. Studies show that people who get enough sleep can concentrate and focus longer and more effectively. They tend to be more creative and better problem solvers. With Type 2 diabetes, lack of sleep is a strong predictor for getting Continue reading >>

Pulmonary Function And Sleep Breathing: Two New Targets For Type 2 Diabetes Care

Pulmonary Function And Sleep Breathing: Two New Targets For Type 2 Diabetes Care

Pulmonary Function and Sleep Breathing: Two New Targets for Type 2 Diabetes Care Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Hospital Universitari Arnau de Vilanova, Institut de Recerca Biomdica de Lleida, Universitat de Lleida, Spain Centro de Investigacin Biomdica en Red de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metablicas Asociadas, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain Correspondence and Reprint Requests: Rafael Sim, MD, PhD, Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Hospital Universitari Vall dHebron, Diabetes and Metabolism Research Unit, VHIR, Passeig de la Vall dHebron 119-129, 08035 Barcelona, Spain. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: Centro de Investigacin Biomdica en Red de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metablicas Asociadas, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Hospital Universitari Vall dHebron, Diabetes and Metabolism Research Unit, Vall dHebron Institut de Recerca, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, Spain Search for other works by this author on: Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine Department of Human Physiology and Sleep Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef afrik University, Slovak Republic Search for other works by this author on: Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Search for other works by this author on: Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Hospital Universitari Arnau de Vilanova, Institut de Recerca Biomdica de Lleida, Universitat de Lleida, Spain Search for other works by this author on: Respiratory Department, Hospital Universitari Arnau de Vilanova-Santa Mara, Institut de Recerca Biomdica de Lleida, Universitat de Lleida, Spain Continue reading >>

Lack Of Sleep Has Genetic Link With Type 2 Diabetes

Lack Of Sleep Has Genetic Link With Type 2 Diabetes

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea Linked To Type 2 Diabetes

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Linked To Type 2 Diabetes

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Linked To Type 2 Diabetes Join the fight against diabetes on Facebook Two recent studies have now been published showing that Obstructive Sleep Apnea increases the sufferers chances of developing type 2 diabetes. But what does a sleep disorder have to do with diabetes? For anyone who is not familiar with Obstructive Sleep Apnea, it is a disorder which a persons upper airway is obstructed during sleep. This can be due to many different reasons but the most common reason for Obstructive Sleep Apnea is obesity . The upper airway is obstructed or closes during sleep which causes the person to wake up hundreds of times during the night. They only wake up enough to start breathing again but this sleep pattern leaves the person unrested every day. So it must be the obesity that links sleep apnea to type 2 diabetes, right? Wrong. Researchers have now found that when a patients airway is obstructed their body triggers its fight or flight response. This response produces high levels of cortisol. Cortisol at high levels leads to insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. The study performed at Yale School of Medicine found that people diagnosed with Obstructive Sleep Apnea were up to 2.5 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. The study also showed that the more severe the sleep apnea the greater the risk was for developing diabetes. Some of the symptoms of Sleep Apnea include loud snoring and daytime sleepiness. It is very, very important that anyone with either of these symptoms consult their physician. Their are non surgical treatments available for sleep apnea. One such treatment involves wearing a mask over the nose while sleeping which forces air into the airway while sleeping. This treatment is known as CPAP continuous positive airway pressur Continue reading >>

Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Daytime Sleepiness, And Type 2 Diabetes

Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Daytime Sleepiness, And Type 2 Diabetes

SAGE Video Streaming video collections SAGE Knowledge The ultimate social sciences library SAGE Research Methods The ultimate methods library SAGE Stats Data on Demand CQ Library American political resources About Privacy Policy Terms of Use Contact Us Help Health Sciences Life Sciences Materials Science & Engineering Social Sciences & Humanities Journals A-Z Authors Editors Reviewers Librarians Researchers Societies Advertising Reprints Content Sponsorships Permissions ISSN: 0145-7217 Online ISSN: 1554-6063 Continue reading >>

The Link Between Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

The Link Between Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

The American Diabetes Association estimates that nearly 30 million Americans live with diabetes. Even more concerning, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. The condition can be caused by an autoimmune problem, where the body attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin to keep blood sugar levels in check. This is known as type 1 diabetes. Or, the condition can be type 2 diabetes which arises from insulin resistance–where the body doesn’t respond to insulin and blood sugar remains at abnormal levels. Type 2 diabetes is more common and is not an autoimmune disease but rather a “lifestyle disease” once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes. There is no cure for type 2 diabetes, but it can be managed and prevented. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, high blood pressure and heart disease, but recent research has pinpointed another condition that is linked as well: sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is more than just an issue with sleep quality. Sleep apnea is the interruption of breathing, typically caused when tissue in the back of the throat collapses into the airway, blocking the breath, and is associated with a host of health issues. Experts have grown certain that the disorder increases cardiovascular (heart) risk, for example. There’s also mounting evidence that sleep apnea may contribute to problems like insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes. “If you have hypertension (high blood pressure), you’re more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea; and if you have sleep apnea, you are more likely to have hypertension,”says Said Mostafavi, M.D., the Chief Medical Officer for Advanced Sleep Medicine Services, Inc. and a sleep specialist. “In the same way, if you have diabetes, you’re mor Continue reading >>

The Sleep-diabetes Connection

The Sleep-diabetes Connection

Whenever diabetes patients enter Lynn Maarouf’s office with out-of-control blood sugar levels, she immediately asks them how they are sleeping at night. All too often, the answer is the same: not well. “Any time your blood sugar is really high, your kidneys try to get rid of it by urinating,” says Maarouf, RD, the diabetes education director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. “So you are probably getting up and going to bathroom all night long -- and not sleeping well.” Diabetes and sleep problems often go hand in hand. Diabetes can cause sleep loss, and there’s evidence that not sleeping well can increase your risk of developing diabetes. Maarouf says high blood sugar is a red flag for sleep problems among people with diabetes for another reason. “People who are tired will eat more because they want to get energy from somewhere,” she says. “That can mean consuming sugar or other foods that can spike blood sugar levels.” “I really push people to eat properly throughout the day and get their blood sugars under control so they sleep better at night,” Maarouf says. “If you get your blood sugar under control, you will get a good night sleep and wake up feeling fabulous with lots of energy.” “There is some evidence that sleep deprivation could lead to pre-diabetic state,” says Mark Mahowald, MD, director of the Minnesota Regional Sleep Disorders Center in Hennepin County. According to Mahowald, the body's reaction to sleep loss can resemble insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes. Insulin’s job is to help the body use glucose for energy. In insulin resistance, cells fail to use the hormone efficiently, resulting in high blood sugar. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough in Continue reading >>

Insufficient Sleep Raises Type 2 Diabetes Risk In Children

Insufficient Sleep Raises Type 2 Diabetes Risk In Children

Insufficient sleep raises type 2 diabetes risk in children Could as little as 1 hour of sleep influence children's risk of developing type 2 diabetes? A new study suggests so. New research investigates the link between sleep duration and risk markers for type 2 diabetes in children. In the United States, 1 in 3 people are estimated to develop type 2 diabetes at one point in their lifetime. The disease affects men and women of all ages, but according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 5,000 young people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes every year. Researchers from St. George's, University of London in the United Kingdom set out to examine the potential link between sleep duration and type 2 diabetes risk in children. The team was led by St. George's professor Christopher G. Owen, and the findings were published in the journal Pediatrics. As the authors of the new research explain, the possible associations between the length of sleep and the risk markers for type 2 diabetes have not been sufficiently studied. Studying sleep duration and diabetes risk Prof. Owen and colleagues examined 4,525 multiethnic children aged between 9 and 10 years, all of whom were living in the U.K. They took the children's body measurements, including height, weight, blood pressure , and bioimpedance - a measure of how well the body resists electric current, which gives insights into body composition. The researchers took blood samples and tested the children's predisposition to type 2 diabetes using a plasma glucose test . The scientists also tested the children's levels of lipids, insulin , and the hemoglobin HbA1c, among others. Insulin is the hormone that regulates blood sugar. An imbalance in the body's lipids - or body fat - is thought to Continue reading >>

Poor Sleep And Diabetes: The Worse You Sleep, The Higher Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Poor Sleep And Diabetes: The Worse You Sleep, The Higher Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk

A new study published Thursday in Diabetologia reaffirms the importance of a good night’s sleep in order to stay healthy. Analyzing the medical histories of more than 100,000 female nurses, the study authors found those who reported frequently having trouble sleeping were 45 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes over the course of a decade than those who didn’t. For the unfortunate nurses who reported having sleep apnea, sleeping fewer than six hours, and often working the graveyard shift in addition to sleeping difficulty, that risk increased more than four-fold. Though poor sleepers were also more likely to have underlying health problems like hypertension or high BMI, these factors only partially explained the association between sleep troubles and diabetes. “Our findings highlight the importance of sleep disturbance in the development and prevention of type 2 diabetes,” the authors concluded. The authors utilized data from two of the longest-running observational studies in existence: The Nurses’ Health Study I and II, which began in 1976 and 1989 respectively. Every two years, NHS volunteers are mailed questionnaires about their “lifestyle practices and other exposures of interest, as well as the incidence of disease.” For the purposes of their study, the current authors solely focused on the 133,353 women who weren’t already diagnosed with preexisting conditions like cancer, heart disease and diabetes by the year 2000, answered questions about their sleeping habits, and remained in the NHS for up to an additional ten years. During that decade, 6,407 women in total self-reported a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, while 5.8 percent of NHS I women and 4.8 percent of NHS II women reported having difficulty falling or staying asleep all or most of Continue reading >>

Lack Of Sleep Tied To Higher Risk Of Diabetes In Kids

Lack Of Sleep Tied To Higher Risk Of Diabetes In Kids

Reuters Health - Children who don’t get enough sleep may be more likely to develop diabetes than kids who typically get enough shuteye, a UK study suggests. That’s because each additional hour of sleep children get at night is associated with a lower body weight, more lean muscle mass and less accumulation of sugars in the blood, researchers report in Pediatrics. Obesity and elevated blood sugar are risk factors for type 2 diabetes, which happens when the body can’t properly use or make enough of the hormone insulin to convert blood sugar into energy. “These findings suggest increasing sleep duration could offer a simple, cost-effective approach to reducing levels of body fat and type 2 diabetes risk early in life,” senior study author Christopher Owen of St. George’s, University of London, said by email. Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult-onset diabetes because it was so rare in children. But today, it’s a common childhood health problem, in large part because millions of kids worldwide are overweight or obese, don’t get enough exercise, and eat too many sugary and fatty foods. For the current study, researchers examined survey data on sleep habits and lab results from tests of risk factors for diabetes in 4,525 UK children age 9 or 10. On average, the kids slept 10.5 hours on school nights, although sleep duration ranged from 8 to 12 hours. Children who got less sleep in the study were more likely to have a risk factor for diabetes known as insulin resistance, when the body doesn’t respond normally to the hormone. Kids who slept less were also more likely to be extremely overweight or obese and have more body fat, the study also found. Kids 6 to 12 years old should get 9 to 12 hours of sleep a night, according to the American Academy of Pediatri Continue reading >>

Poor Sleep Can Increase Risk Of Heart Disease, Type 2 Diabetes, Stroke And More Here Is Why A Good Nights Rest Is Great For Your Health

Poor Sleep Can Increase Risk Of Heart Disease, Type 2 Diabetes, Stroke And More Here Is Why A Good Nights Rest Is Great For Your Health

Poor sleep can increase risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, stroke and more here is why a good nights rest is great for your health The better we sleep at night, the more focused and productive we are POOR sleep can can increase risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, stroke and more. Barry Smith, head at Great Yarmouth High School, Norfolk, has told parents to get teen kids in bed by 9pm. But its not just youngsters who need kip. Here CHRISTINA EARLE reveals why you should turn in early. It's not just kids that need to get to sleep early but adults too A good sleep routine leaves the heart happy. An American Academy of Sleep Medicine study revealed those who get by on less than six hours per night raise their risk of heart disease. Those who snooze more than six hours a night are less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. If you get less kip than this, your risk of the condition rises by 15 per cent, a US study at Harvard University found. Six hours of sleep a night can ward of the risks of Type 2 diabetes Getting too little sleep makes us crave carbs, according to a study by US researchers. It showed we scoff up to 50 per cent more after a poor nights rest, which means you are more likely to put on weight. Too little shut-eye causes a loss of brain tissue and function. Research at Uppsala University, in Sweden, discovered just one nights poor sleep can have an adverse effect on the brain. Getting enough sleep also boosts your immune system Getting at least 7.5 hours sleep a night can help you live longer. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine found that if you get just six hours, your chance of dying prematurely goes up four times. THERE are five stages of sleep which alternate, in various orders, in four to five cycles through the night. You need them all for good Continue reading >>

Less Sleep Tied To Diabetes Risk In Children

Less Sleep Tied To Diabetes Risk In Children

Children who sleep less may be at increased risk for Type 2 diabetes, researchers report. Earlier studies found a link between shorter sleep and diabetes in adults, but the connection has been little studied in children. British researchers studied 4,525 9- and 10-year olds from varying ethnic backgrounds. On average, their parents reported they slept 10 hours a night, with 95 percent sleeping between eight and 12 hours. The study, in Pediatrics, found that the less sleep, the more likely the children were to have higher body mass indexes, higher insulin resistance and higher glucose readings. All three are risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. Over all, increasing weekday sleep duration by an hour was associated with a 0.2 lower B.M.I. and a 3 percent reduction in insulin resistance. The reasons for the link remain unclear, but the researchers suggest that poor sleep may affect appetite regulation, leading to overeating and obesity. This observational study could not establish cause and effect. Still, the senior author, Christopher G. Owen, a professor of epidemiology at St. George’s University of London, said that for children, the more sleep the better — there is no threshold. “Increasing sleep is a very simple, low-cost intervention,” he said. “We should be doing our utmost to make sure that children sleep for an adequate amount of time.” Continue reading >>

Sleep And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus- Clinical Implications.

Sleep And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus- Clinical Implications.

1. J Assoc Physicians India. 2012 Oct;60:42-7. Sleep and type 2 diabetes mellitus- clinical implications. (1)Ambika Clinic, A/224, Kasturi Plaza, Manpada Road, Dombivli (East), Thane - 421 201, Maharashtra. Sleep is essential for life. Body systems require sleep of good quantity andquality for their proper functioning. Glucose metabolism can be affectedadversely by several sleep disorders. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is one of themost important disorder identified in the last 50 years which has systemiceffects including glucose metabolism. Aging process also has its effects onglucose metabolism. There is a close relation between sleep, aging and metabolic syndrome. OSA and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (Type 2 DM) share several features in common. There is mounting evidence to show a close association between sleepdeprivation, sleep disordered breathing-OSA, excessive sleepiness, insomnia,restless legs syndrome and Type 2 DM. The role of sleep deprivation, particularlyREM sleep deprivation, in the genesis of obesity needs to be recognized. Theclose association of OSA with insulin resistance demands the recognition of OSAin fatty liver and polycystic ovary syndrome. Treatment of OSA by continuouspositive airway pressure has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity. It isimportant for primary care physicians to have a high degree of suspicion of anunderlying sleep disorder in patients with diabetes. Management of sleep disorderis highly rewarding. Continue reading >>

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