diabetestalk.net

Sleep Aids For Diabetics

Melatonin, Sleep, And Type 2 Diabetes

Melatonin, Sleep, And Type 2 Diabetes

My constant search for a better understanding of the Type 2 diabetes that entered my life fifteen years ago keeps bringing me back to problems with sleep. It raises the question: Why is there such a strong link between poor sleep and Type 2? Part of the sleep connection may lie in melatonin. As it turns out, melatonin has a lot in common with insulin. Both are hormones, though melatonin is produced by your pineal gland in the brain, while insulin is made in your pancreas (and also to some degree in the brain). Problems with either hormone are associated with diabetes. Test show that melatonin is often low in people with the metabolic syndrome, which is a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes. The latest research has deepened evidence of a relationship between melatonin and regulation of insulin production in the pancreas. Researchers began investigating when studies showed that nurses who worked the night shift had a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome and Type 2 diabetes. Other shift workers were also found to have the same problem. The researchers found that messing up the circadian rhythm, which makes us want to sleep in the dark and be awake during the day, lowers our levels of melatonin and serotonin. By studying rats, they found that this rhythm is tied up with insulin production, too. In young people without diabetes, melatonin levels are higher at night while insulin levels are low, and during the day melatonin is lower while insulin is higher. It is all part of our natural circadian rhythm. But as we age, the melatonin levels lower. One result is that older people do not sleep as well. What this sounds like to me is that melatonin affects sleep, which affects insulin, which in turn affects melatonin. It is a cycle I would love to know how to break. Why should you Continue reading >>

Eat What You Love With Diabetes

Eat What You Love With Diabetes

What can diabetics eat? Why are carbohydrates an integral part of every healthy diet? They impact blood sugars, or glucose, more than fats and protein. So, diabetics who count their carbs at each meal and snack have good success keeping their blood glucose in a healthy range. When you're diagnosed with diabetes and meet with a registered dietitian (RD) or certified diabetes educator (CDE), you're usually given a carbohydrate prescription for each meal. This prescription will work with the medicine or insulin you're taking to help keep your blood sugar normal. What is a carbohydrate serving size? 15g of carbohydrates = 1 carbohydrate serving To determine your serving size, check the nutrition facts label for the number of carbohydrate grams (g). If the total carbohydrate count is equal to 15g, then check the top of the food label for the serving size for one serving. If the carbohydrate total is more than 15g, then divide the total by 15. For example, a food with 30g of carbs contains 2 carb servings, because 30 divided by 15 = 2. If the carbohydrate total is less than 15g, then multiply the serving size so that your serving will have 15g carbs. List of foods with 1 carb serving The food list below shows the approximate size of 1 carbohydrate serving. Because products vary, check the nutrition facts information to get an accurate carbohydrate count. Apple = 1 small (4 oz.) Bagel = 1/4 large (1 oz.) Banana = 1 small (4 oz.) Beans, Pinto = 1/2 cup Beans, Kidney = 1/2 cup Bread = 1 oz. slice Cake = 2" square (unfrosted) Cereal = 3/4 cup or 1 oz. (ready-to-eat) Cereal = 1/2 cup (cooked) Cookies = 2 small Corn = 1/2 cup Crackers = 6 (Saltines) Fruit, Canned = 1/2 cup (unsweetened) Hamburger Bun = 1/2 bun Ice Cream = 1/2 cup (light) Jam or Jelly = 1 tablespoon Milk = 1 cup Ora Continue reading >>

Sleep Interrupted? The Blood Sugar And Sleep Connection

Sleep Interrupted? The Blood Sugar And Sleep Connection

In my last newsletter, I wrote about how most people with sleep trouble think they have too much energy and simply can’t settle down. I also discussed that one of the main causes of insomnia is actually a deep level of exhaustion. Odd as it may seem, the body needs energy to calm or sedate itself for sleep. Without energy, we stay awake, “wired and tired.” The second most common cause of insomnia is a silent blood sugar issue that affects one third of Americans. The worst part is, a shocking 90% of people are unaware of this problem until it is too late! (1) Could you or someone you know be suffering from blood-sugar-related insomnia? Keep reading to learn the facts about this troubling, little-known sleep issue. First Comes Stress, Then Come Cravings Sleep disorders affect an estimated 50-70 million Americans and, as I discussed in my last newsletter, much of this is caused by stress and exhaustion. When under stress, the adrenals go shopping for energy. Their favorite stop is the pancreas, where stress generates insatiable cravings for sweets to create the energy the adrenals can no longer provide. Before you know it, Americans are waking up to a sugar-laced cup of coffee or two. In an attempt to pick the healthy choice, we might sip green tea to keep us going through the morning. Lunch might be a salad and a diet soda. Then, as the blood sugar starts plummeting, bringing on the all-too-well-known afternoon crash, dark chocolate is passed around the office as if you had called room service. By the end of the workday, either a workout, latte or a nap is the only thing getting us home without falling asleep. The Band-aid Cure To remedy this, some of us have adopted a diet that was originally formulated for folks with severe hypoglycemia”the “six small meals a Continue reading >>

Metformin And Sleep Disorders

Metformin And Sleep Disorders

Go to: Abstract Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug. Deterioration of sleep is an important unwanted side effect of metformin. Here, the authors review and present the details on metformin and sleep problem. Keywords: Metformin, sleep disorders, side effect Go to: Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disorder. Millions of patients have to use anti-diabetic drugs. A widely used oral anti-diabetic drug is metformin (C4H11N5 · HCl). Under fasting conditions, about 50 % bioavailability of metformin has been observed.[1] After ingestion, metformin is slowly absorbed and reaches its peak level in blood in 1-3 hours, and its elimination half-life is about 1.5-6 hours.[1] The main route of metformin elimination is tubular secretion.[1] Metformin use results in decreased hepatic glucose production and decreased intestinal absorption of glucose.[1] In addition, metformin can help improve insulin sensitivity via increasing peripheral glucose uptake and utilization.[1] Similar to other drugs, adverse effects of metformin are reported. These can result in poor compliance of the diabetic patient,[1] causing an irregular intake of the drug.[1] Apart from the well known ill effects of hypoglycemia and diarrhea, other unwanted effects of metformin have also been observed. The effect of metformin on sleep is interesting. Here, the authors review and present the details on metformin and sleep problem. Go to: METFORMIN – INDUCED INSOMNIA Metformin – induced insomnia is widely mentioned in old and obese diabetic patients who have been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus recently and prescribed with metformin. The development of insomnia can be seen within a few days after starting metformin. This is an interesting unwanted effect that is not quoted in other antidiabetic drugs Continue reading >>

Sleeping Pills And Natural Sleep Aids: Prescription And Over-the-counter Products

Sleeping Pills And Natural Sleep Aids: Prescription And Over-the-counter Products

Prescription and Over-the-Counter Products Its the middle of the night, and youre staring at the ceiling, thinking about work, or bills, or the kids. Sleep just wont come, so you reach for a sleeping pill. But did you know that sleep medications are rarely meant for more than short-term use? They can cause dependence and tolerance, and the benefits dont always outweigh the risks. Learn what you need to know about the side effects and safety concerns of common sleep medicationsas well as effective insomnia treatments that dont come in pill form. Are sleeping pills or sleep aids right for you? When youre desperate to get some rest, its tempting to head for the medicine cabinet for relief. And you may get it in the moment. But if you regularly have trouble sleeping, thats a red flag that somethings wrong. It could be something as simple as too much caffeine or viewing electronic screens late at night. Or it may be a symptom of an underlying medical or psychological problem. But whatever it is, it wont be cured with sleeping pills. At best, sleeping pills are a temporary band aid. At worst, theyre an addictive crutch that can make insomnia worse in the long run. That doesnt mean that medication should never be used, but its important to weigh the benefits against the risks. In general, sleeping pills and sleep aids are most effective when used sparingly for short-term situations, such as traveling across time zones or recovering from a medical procedure. If sleeping pills are used over the long term, they are best used only on an infrequent, as needed basis to avoid dependence and tolerance. All prescription sleeping pills have side effects, which vary depending on the specific drug, the dosage, and how long the drug lasts in your system. Common side effects include prolon Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Troubles

Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Troubles

Sleep is important for everyone, but it’s especially important when your body experiences changing blood sugar levels and other symptoms of type 2 diabetes. “Sleep deprivation causes changes in the effectiveness of the body's control of appetite, which can lead to weight gain, higher blood sugar, and increased resistance to insulin,” says Richard Castriotta, MD, director of the division of pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Although sleep is very important when you have type 2 diabetes, you may find you can’t sleep when you need it most. One explanation for the problem seems to be the connection between diabetes and sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a condition that’s characterized by periods of halted breathing while you’re asleep, which wakes you up repeatedly throughout the night, leaving you fatigued and not well rested in the morning. Both type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea are health concerns that are linked to obesity, so experts have long recognized a connection between the two. However, only recently has it been realized how closely these conditions are tied to one another. “There’s much more interrelation between the two conditions than we thought,” says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, a physician in the Cleveland Clinic’s department of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism. “In fact, one may actually contribute to causing the other, and vice versa. Recent studies have shown that sleep apnea actually increases insulin resistance, hunger, and other type 2 diabetes symptoms,” Dr. Hatipoglu says. “Other studies have shown that treating sleep apnea also improves the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.” Other Sleep Issues You Might Face Another problem that disrupts sleep is frequent urinatio Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Insomnia – The Connection

Diabetes And Insomnia – The Connection

According to The Academy of Sleep Medicine “almost 1/3 of American adults complain they can’t fall asleep, stay asleep or wake up too early in the morning unable to fall back asleep”. These 3 main types of insomnia usually have different causes. The first type is getting to sleep and causes include unresolved stress, anxiety, “a mind with racing thoughts that can’t shut down”, eating a big meal prior to bedtime, exercising vigorously shortly before bed and being exposed to blue or white light(electronics) before bed. The second type is being unable to stay asleep and for these cases, the causes include medical issues such as having uncontrolled diabetes and needing to urinate several times a night, having an enlarged prostate which increases bedtime urination, having GERD which can result in heartburn, pain and discomfort when lying down after a meal, sleep apnea which causes the patient to stop breathing and wake up several times a night and assorted chronic pain which can wake you out of a deep sleep. People with diabetes often suffer from chronic pain due to peripheral neuropathy which makes staying asleep almost impossible. They can experience a tingling, burning, pins and needles sensation and numbness along with restless leg syndrome making it more difficult for them to stay asleep. Other aches and pains including arthritis, spinal stenosis, headaches, sciatica and cervical neck pain can make getting a full night of sleep a challenge. The third most common sleep disorder is getting up too early and not being able to fall back asleep. This occurs because of added light, excess noise, heat and depression. “Chronic insomnia can increase death from all causes more than 3 times than in those who have normal sleep patterns”. There is “healing power” Continue reading >>

The Sleep-diabetes Connection

The Sleep-diabetes Connection

Whenever diabetes patients enter Lynn Maarouf’s office with out-of-control blood sugar levels, she immediately asks them how they are sleeping at night. All too often, the answer is the same: not well. “Any time your blood sugar is really high, your kidneys try to get rid of it by urinating,” says Maarouf, RD, the diabetes education director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. “So you are probably getting up and going to bathroom all night long -- and not sleeping well.” Diabetes and sleep problems often go hand in hand. Diabetes can cause sleep loss, and there’s evidence that not sleeping well can increase your risk of developing diabetes. Maarouf says high blood sugar is a red flag for sleep problems among people with diabetes for another reason. “People who are tired will eat more because they want to get energy from somewhere,” she says. “That can mean consuming sugar or other foods that can spike blood sugar levels.” “I really push people to eat properly throughout the day and get their blood sugars under control so they sleep better at night,” Maarouf says. “If you get your blood sugar under control, you will get a good night sleep and wake up feeling fabulous with lots of energy.” “There is some evidence that sleep deprivation could lead to pre-diabetic state,” says Mark Mahowald, MD, director of the Minnesota Regional Sleep Disorders Center in Hennepin County. According to Mahowald, the body's reaction to sleep loss can resemble insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes. Insulin’s job is to help the body use glucose for energy. In insulin resistance, cells fail to use the hormone efficiently, resulting in high blood sugar. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough in Continue reading >>

Diabetics Need Immediate First Aid For Low Blood Sugars

Diabetics Need Immediate First Aid For Low Blood Sugars

Diabetics, diagnosed as someone with extraordinarily high blood sugars, sometimes experience quite the opposite. And when they do, it is important to treat low blood sugar conditions promptly. Hypoglycemia can happen when diabetics take too much insulin, don’t consume enough calories or expend more energy than planned. A blood glucose level of less than 70 mg/dl is generally considered low, according to the Joslin Diabetes Center. Severely low blood sugar levels can lead to a coma or could be fatal. If detected quickly, low blood sugars can be treated at home without having to make a trip to the doctor or emergency room. That is why it is important for family members, friends or caretakers to recognize the signs of hypoglycemia and know how to respond.Many diabetics “get a certain feeling” when their blood sugars are dropping. They are able to consume some extra carbohydrates and protein to raise their levels. However, blood sugars sometimes drop suddenly – and diabetics are in distress without realizing it. Common signs of hypoglycemia are shakiness, dizziness, difficulty speaking, confusion, fatigue, sweating and anxiety. The behavior can be similar to someone who has consumed too much alcohol. If you notice a diabetic experiencing these symptoms, check their level with a blood sugar monitor. If the diabetic is unresponsive or you are unable to administer any treatment, you should immediately call 911 and get the patient to a hospital as soon as possible. If the reading is 70 or lower and the person is conscious, doctors recommend following the 15-15 Rule of first aid: Eat or drink 15 grams of a carbohydrate (which metabolizes into sugar). Four to six ounces of fruit juice or regular soda (Coke, Mountain Dew) will infuse the system with instant sugar. Don’t Continue reading >>

Are There Safe Sleep Aids For Seniors?

Are There Safe Sleep Aids For Seniors?

Lakelover asked... Are there effective safe sleep aids for seniors with sleep problems not due to other medications? Expert Answers Kenneth Robbins, M.D., is a senior medical editor of Caring.com. He is board certified in psychiatry and internal medicine, has a master's in public health from the University of Michigan, and is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His current clinical practice focuses primarily on geriatrics. He has written and contributed to many articles and is frequently invited to speak on psychiatric topics, such as psychiatry and the law, depression, anxiety, dementia, and suicide risk and prevention. In the treatment of sleep problems, it is always best to first try non-pharmacologic options so there is no danger of side effects. The first step is to adopt standard sleep hygiene techniques that have been shown to be effective. These include, first, maintaining a regular sleep wake cycle, so that the time one goes to sleep and wakes up vary by only an hour from night to night. This prevents disruption of circadian rhythms, the changes in our endocrine systems during the day, and improves sleep. Next, one should exercise regularly, but not within several hours of going to sleep. One should avoid daytime naps, because they can interfere with sleep at night, and should avoid heavy meals within a couple of hours of going to bed. It is important to avoid stimulants, such as caffeine within at least 3 or 4 hours of going to sleep. Some people who are particularly sensitive may have to restrict caffeine to the early morning or decrease its use, sometimes even eliminate it. One should work to create a comfortable, quiet, dark and temperature controlled bedroom and develop a relaxing routine for the hour before getting i Continue reading >>

Sleep Apnea And Diabetes: Tale Of Two Co-existing Killer Diseases

Sleep Apnea And Diabetes: Tale Of Two Co-existing Killer Diseases

Sleep Apnea and Diabetes: Tale of Two Co-Existing Killer Diseases Of all the sleep disorders, sleep apnea is most common, affecting almost 80% of all diagnosed patients. On the other hand, diabetes, a kind of disorder affecting the bodys metabolism, is currently affecting a total of 25.8 million people in America, including of children. Of these, only 18.8 million are diagnosed and between 90 and 95% suffer from diabetes type 2. In terms of age-wise prevalence , the highest risk group is 20 years and above (25.6 million or 11.3% of people of this age) followed by people who are 65 years of age or older (10.9 million or 26.9% of people in this age bracket). While 11.8% of all men above the age of 20 have diabetes, 10.8% of women in this age group have this ailment. Before we elaborate further on how sleep apnea and diabetes are linked and how the conditions can be managed simultaneously, let us get a clear idea of what diabetes is. Most people know it as having excess sugar in the blood. Is that all or there is more to it? Do diabetes and sleep have any links? Let us find out. n there is excess glucose (sugar) in your blood . Though presence of glucose is mandatory for producing energy, too much of it can be risky for your health. But how does the body get glucose? It essentially comes from the foods you eat. The liver and pancreas also produce glucose. The reason why diabetes is called a disorder affecting metabolism is because it is involved with the way the body utilizes the glucose in the blood for the purposes of getting energy and achieving growth. The process starts with digested foods forming glucose which goes into the blood for further use by the cells. However, to enable glucose penetrate into the cells, a type of hormone is necessary, called insulin, produce Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Sleep Disturbances On Diabetes:

The Impact Of Sleep Disturbances On Diabetes:

BY Daniel Einhorn, MD, FACP, FACE Introduction Sleeping disorders affect everyone from teenagers to the elderly. Not getting a good night’s sleep can have a major negative impact on your health and well-being. Multiple studies show that being deprived of sleep for any reason has negative effects on blood pressure, blood sugar, and fats in the blood. This in turn can lead to poorer diabetes control and complications. We have long known about the need for good nutrition and physical activity to help with diabetes. Good sleep is also important for your health and well-being. Lack of sleep is common in adults with type 2 diabetes. This is partly because more of this group has obesity, and partly because of other factors, not fully understood, about diabetes. So, it is important that every person with diabetes and their families have an understanding of sleep issues and whether it affects them. This article will briefly review the various causes of sleep deprivation, show how it affects diabetes, and suggest how some sleep problems can be managed. Consequences of Lack of Sleep Daytime drowsiness is the most obvious result of poor sleep. This is not only unpleasant, but it has also been shown to increase one’s risk of accidents and to affect judgment and performance. The majority of fatal car accidents that are not caused by alcohol intake are believed to be caused by people either falling asleep at the wheel or being too tired to handle a situation. Medical interns and residents are no longer allowed to work as many hours per week as in the past because it was shown that they begin to make mistakes when fatigued, mistakes that can have grave consequences. Airline pilots have long known this. Research shows that we eat differently when we are sleep deprived. In carefully Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

Melatonin And Blood Pressure

Melatonin And Blood Pressure

People usually associate melatonin with sleep aids – and it is a natural one… But among it’s other great attributes, melatonin also can help lower elevated blood pressure. To learn more about it, I interviewed Russel Reiter, Ph.D., a researcher at the University of Texas–San Antonio’s Department of Cellular and Structural Biology who knows more about melatonin than practically anybody on the planet. He’s conducted numerous studies on melatonin and written hundreds of scientific papers. Every one of those studies indicates that having a robust melatonin level is associated with better health. Because of his expertise I contacted him to ask about the connection between melatonin and blood pressure. One of the things I learned from him is that the commercialization of electricity has had a damaging effect on our collective melatonin level. Among other things, electricity allows us stay up later than nature intended, which throws off our natural response to sunlight and darkness. And that means our bodies produce less of this important hormone. The pineal gland − located behind the forehead − is stimulated to produce melatonin only in darkness. Therefore, Dr. Reiter believes our ongoing exposure to artificial light has caused us to become relatively deficient in melatonin. In turn, this has had adverse effects on the body’s ability to regulate sleep and other biological rhythms. Yet another result of our deficiency may be a tendency toward elevated blood pressure. How to Lower Your Blood Pressure with Melatonin Blood pressure naturally fluctuates over a 24-hour period, and is highest during the day and lowest at night. Researchers call this natural drop in pressure a nocturnal dip. Some people dip only slightly or not at all, while others dip as much as 20 Continue reading >>

Sleeping Pills Can Be Deadly

Sleeping Pills Can Be Deadly

When you can’t sleep, the temptation to pop a sleeping pill is strong. But did you know you could be risking your life? There’s a large body of research indicating that sleeping pills may contribute to as many as 500,000 deaths each year in the United States. Most sleeping pills are “sedative hypnotics”—a class of drugs used to treat anxiety. Examples include Xanax, Valium, Lunesta, and Ambien. Most of these drugs are highly addictive and come with a range of side effects, such as dizziness, drowsiness, and impaired coordination. Sleeping Pills’ Dark Side The most serious risks of these drugs relate to their effects on memory and behavior. Because they act on brain chemistry, sleeping pills can cause changes in brain function and behavior, including memory impairment, nervousness, confusion, hallucinations, irritability, and aggressiveness. They have also been shown to increase feelings of depression, including suicidal thinking. Daniel F. Kripke, MD, Professor of Psychiatry Emeritus at the University of California, San Diego, has worked for more than 30 years assessing the risk of sleeping pills, and his findings are stunning. For one thing, 18 population-based studies have shown a clear link between the use of sleeping pills and increased mortality risk. Four of these studies specifically found that the use of sleeping pills predicted increased risk of death from cancer. In Kripke’s latest study, published February 2012 in BMJ Online, his team obtained medical records for 10,529 people prescribed hypnotic sleeping pills, and compared them to records for 23,676 matched patients never prescribed sleeping pills. Over an average of 2½ years, the death rate for those who did not use sleeping pills was 1.2 percent, versus 6.1 percent for those who did. Subjec Continue reading >>

More in diabetes