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Skinny With Diabetes

Diabulimia: Dying To Be Skinny With Type 1 Diabetes

Diabulimia: Dying To Be Skinny With Type 1 Diabetes

Betsy was a superstar in high school. She excelled at sports, was homecoming queen and enjoyed hanging out with friends. She was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 11, and earned the nickname “Splenda” in high school because she was sweet, and didn’t let her diabetes dampen her spirit. Betsy was from a small town, and didn’t know anyone personally who had type 1 diabetes. Once she went off to college, Betsy started to enjoy her newfound freedom and attended off-campus parties. One night, she wanted to wear a cute outfit, but her insulin pump seemed to bulge out of her shirt. Betsy realized that if she removed her insulin pump, her shirt would look “perfect.” So she removed it for the evening. When she weighed herself the next day, her weight was down two pounds. Betsy realized that if she didn’t wear her pump (and didn’t take her insulin), she could lose a few extra pounds. Although her glucose levels stayed elevated, she lost weight quickly without taking insulin. Betsy thought she discovered the key to getting super skinny. Being thin seemed more important than blood glucose management. As is true with most young women with this disease, Betsy worried less about the possible long- term consequences of type 1 diabetes (such as eye, kidney or heart disease). Instead she became obsessed with the idea of quick weight loss. After all, she couldn’t get rid of her type 1 diabetes, but she could control her body weight if she didn’t take her insulin. Betsy was suffering from an eating disorder called “diabulimia”, a life-threatening condition in which the sufferer withholds insulin to lose weight. Insulin withholding is often accompanied by other eating disorder behaviors (such as binge eating.) The Seriousness of Diabulimia Having an eating disorde Continue reading >>

Yes, Thin People Can Get Type 2 Diabetes

Yes, Thin People Can Get Type 2 Diabetes

People assume that if youre skinny, youre healthypeople only get diabetes if theyre overweight or obese. Right? Well, no. No matter how thin you are, you can still get Type 2 diabetes . Diabetes isnt related to how you look, said Misty Duchnik, a dietitian and diabetes educator for Geisinger Community Medical Center in Scranton. Diabetes comes from insulin resistance, which causes high blood sugar. While about 80 percent of people with diabetes are overweight or obese, it happens to thin people as well. Right now, 30 million people in the U.S. have diabetes. Of that, 12 percent of people with diabetes are normal weight. One reason that thin people get diabetes is because they are skinny fat. Also known as dad bod or mom bod, skinny fat refers to a slender body type with small amounts of visible fat. Skinny fat people tend to have a type of fat called visceral fat. Visceral fat grows around your organs instead of under your skin, so it isnt visible. If you have visceral fat, you may not look overweight, but you may still have as much fat as someone who is overweight. The medical term for skinny fat is MONW, which stands for metabolically obese, normal weight, said Duchnik. People who are MONW may look healthy but are at risk for conditions like diabetes. Along with visceral fat, here are some other factors that can lead to diabetes in thin people. Your diet is an important factor in your risk for diabetes. Even if youre thin, a poor diet can still result in visceral fat. Diets high in sugar and unhealthy fats, such as saturated and trans fats, can increase the amount of fat in your body, which can lead to diabetes, said Duchnik. Luckily, visceral fat is very responsive to diet and exercise. Eliminating processed, fried, sugary and fatty foods can help you lose visceral Continue reading >>

Type 2 And Skinny | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 And Skinny | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi all. I have recently received the gift of type 2. I am a fussy eater and am able to eat whatever without gaining weight. I have dropped 20kg. I am now about 51kg. My main question is about diet. Do I need low carb? I want to gain weight safely but be able to enjoy food. I am new to this whole situation and it really is going to be a struggle to find food to eat. How quickly did you lose the 20kg and were you trying to lose weight? Have you had tests to confirm that you aren't Type 1? Eating a low carb diet reduces the amount of glucose in your blood - you can eat low carb / high fat, topping up your food to a higher calorific intake by eating more fats - either by way of butter, fat on meat, olive oil or avocados. I'll tag @daisy1 who has got a great welcome pack post for new members. Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will be able to help. BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist. A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. Its far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 250,000 people who are demonstrating this. On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) Continue reading >>

Why Do Skinny People Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Why Do Skinny People Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Of all the misconceptions about type 2 diabetes one of the worst is, “Only overweight people get diabetes.” What some may fail to realize is that there is a genetic risk factor associated with type 2 diabetes. A new study is taking a closer look at lifestyle interventions versus genetic testing in preventing type 2 diabetes. We know that type 2 diabetes results from a combination of both genetic and lifestyle factors, but we don’t know if adverse lifestyles, like being overweight or sedentary, increase an individual’s underlying genetic risk of diabetes. “If, for example, obese individuals with a high level of genetic risk have a higher risk of developing diabetes than obese individuals with a low level of genetic risk, then preventative strategies that target lifestyle interventions to obese individuals with a high genetic risk would be more effective than strategies that target all obese individuals,” says the study. Researchers found that genetics played a larger role than lifestyle factors in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in those who were younger and leaner. Most importantly, the research showed that the risk of type 2 diabetes increased in those who were obese whatever their level of genetic risk. Is it in your genes? The American Diabetes Association reports that type 2 diabetes has a stronger link to family history and lineage than type 1. “Lifestyle also influences the development of type 2 diabetes. Obesity tends to run in families, and families tend to have similar eating and exercise habits,” says the ADA. “If you have a family history of type 2 diabetes, it may be difficult to figure out whether your diabetes is due to lifestyle factors or genetic susceptibility. Most likely it is due to both. However, don’t lose heart. Studies Continue reading >>

Why Thin People Get Diabetes

Why Thin People Get Diabetes

If you think only overweight men need to worry about diabetes, wake up. One in five normal-weight adults now has prediabetes, up 8 percent from 1994, finds new research from the University of Florida. Among adults over age 45 with BMIs under 25, one in three has high blood sugar, a double-digit jump in two decades. Left untreated, up to 30 percent of people with prediabetes will develop full-blown type 2 within five years. Why the sharp rise in this condition? The abundance of nutrient-void, sugar-packed processed foods is likely having some effect. However, “our increasingly sedentary lifestyles are playing a huge role,” says lead researcher Arch Mainous. “Many people now sit in front of a computer all day and get only minimal, if any, leisure-time exercise. They think that as long as their BMI is under 25, they’re healthy. But the scale gives a false sense of health.” According to Mainous, skimping on exercise is so metabolically harmful because it leads to a higher proportion of body fat than lean muscle mass. He says people with very little lean muscle tend to have low grip strength — and past research has linked low grip strength to heightened risk of prediabetes and diabetes. The easiest way to tell whether you’re potentially in trouble? “Just look in the mirror,” Mainous says. “If you look too soft, you are too soft.” When it comes to high blood sugar, surprisingly, total-body lean muscle mass matters more than even waist circumference, which is often blamed for metabolic health issues. “Many think metabolic syndrome is all about abdominal obesity,” Mainous says. “But we looked at waist circumference in our study, and it did not go up. Incidence of prediabetes did, so I don’t think abdominal obesity is the key.” Mainous believes do Continue reading >>

Think Skinny People Don’t Get Type 2 Diabetes? Think Again.

Think Skinny People Don’t Get Type 2 Diabetes? Think Again.

In the last article we discussed the complex relationship between body weight and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We learned that although obesity is strongly associated with T2DM, a subset of “metabolically healthy obese” (MHO) people have normal blood sugar and insulin sensitivity and don’t ever develop diabetes. In this article we’re going to talk about the mirror reflection of the MHO: the “metabolically unhealthy nonobese” (MUN). These are lean people with either full-fledged type 2 diabetes or some metabolic dysfunction, such as insulin resistance. You might even be surprised to learn that skinny people can and do get T2DM. They are rarely mentioned in the media, and there isn’t much written about them in the scientific literature. Perhaps these folks have been overlooked because type 2 diabetes has been historically viewed as a disease of gluttony and sloth, a self-inflicted outcome of eating too much and not and not exercising enough. But the very existence of the MUN phenotype proves that there’s more to T2DM than overeating and a sedentary lifestyle. Remember that one in three type 2 diabetics are undiagnosed. It’s possible that a significant number of these people that are lean. They don’t suspect they might have T2DM because they’re under the impression that it’s not a condition that affects thin people. This is one of the biggest dangers of the myth that “only fat people get diabetes”. It’s well-known that high blood sugar can precede the development of T2DM for as long as ten years. It is during this time that many of the complications associated with diabetes – nerve damage, retinal changes, and early signs of kidney deterioration – begin to develop. This is why it’s just as important for lean people to maintain healthy blood s Continue reading >>

Thin And Type 2: Non-obese Risk Factors For Developing Diabetes

Thin And Type 2: Non-obese Risk Factors For Developing Diabetes

Emily got quite a surprise when she went for her annual physical exam. The lab tests taken showed that her blood glucose readings were in the range of someone with type 2 diabetes. Since Emily did not fit the usual appearance of someone with type 2 diabetes, her doctor ran the test again and checked for antibodies to insulin and her c-peptide levels, in case Emily was in the early stages of LADA (a slow moving version of type 1 diabetes). The test results were the same, however. Even though Emily, at 5 feet 2 inches and 115 pounds, had never been overweight in her life, she had type 2 diabetes. Emily was one of the 15 percent of individuals in the United States who develop type 2 diabetes even though their BMIs are squarely in the normal range (between 18.5 and 24.9). There can be a number of factors that come into play when a thin person develops type 2 diabetes. Genetics play a significant role in determining disease onset. A strong family history coupled with a sedentary lifestyle and poor eating habits can tip the scales in the wrong direction. So too can a previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes or the birth of a baby greater than nine pounds. Unfortunately for these individuals, their outside appearance is hiding a metabolic profile similar to overweight people who have type 2 diabetes. They are insulin resistant not from excess pounds per say, but from the places where some of their fat cells are stored, and often from a lack of exercise. Many normal weight people with type 2 diabetes have excess visceral fat. Visceral fat is the type of fat surrounding the body’s abdominal organs and is highly metabolically active, producing a variety of hormones that influence glucose and fat metabolism. Fat cells release fatty acids into the blood stream that can damage t Continue reading >>

Skinny People Get Type 2 Diabetes Too: 10st 7lb Man Who Exercised Regularly Is Stunned To Learn He Has The Condition - Which He Then Reversed In 11 Days With New Diet

Skinny People Get Type 2 Diabetes Too: 10st 7lb Man Who Exercised Regularly Is Stunned To Learn He Has The Condition - Which He Then Reversed In 11 Days With New Diet

When I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes four years ago I was stunned. I’d gone for a check-up, and a routine blood test said it all: diabetes. But it made no sense. As a healthy 59-year-old, who went running, played regular cricket, drank moderately (2 units a week) and only weighed 10st 7lb, I was hardly overweight. In fact, at 5ft 7in, my Body Mass Index (BMI) was a healthy 21. Yes, I did overeat sometimes – I was thin and thought I could eat what I liked within reason – but it was mainly healthy food, few ready meals, semi-skimmed milk, grilled rather than fried food, chicken rather than red meat and lots of fresh veg. But over the past two years I had been under a lot of stress: my dad had recently died from prostate cancer, my job had changed radically, and I’d been on high blood pressure pills for a year. Stress can raise your blood sugar levels. But I still thought my diabetes diagnosis was ridiculous – how could someone with my weight and healthy lifestyle be facing the prospect of all the serious complications of type 2 diabetes in ten years’ time, including sight loss and a much greater risk of early death? My GP told me I could control my condition with diet, and gave me a long list of healthy foods and their glycaemic load (the effect each food has on your blood sugar level). After six months on this, my blood sugar level had dropped from 9mmol to 7, although this was still well above 6, the level at which type 2 diabetes is diagnosed. I wanted to be free of diabetes, not just control it. So I researched online and discovered the work of Professor Roy Taylor at Newcastle University. Type 2 is linked to fat clogging up the liver and pancreas, and Professor Taylor had shown that a very low calorie diet could reverse this. I had to try it. I chose Continue reading >>

How A Thin Diabetic Reversed Her Type 2 Diabetes

How A Thin Diabetic Reversed Her Type 2 Diabetes

I received a letter from reader Sarah, who has successfully used low-carbohydrate high-fat diets and intermittent fasting to reverse her type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, she is not particularly overweight as measured by body mass index, yet still suffered from T2D. At her heaviest, she only had a BMI of 24.9, which puts her in the ‘normal’ range. She writes: The letter I immigrated to US from P.R. China in the end of 1998 when I was 31 years old; I weighed about 55 kg (121 lbs). While I was in China, I lived thousands of miles away from my family, so I had sort of an intermittent fasting life style from age 19 to 31 years old. The meals in China were mostly vegetables and very little protein. I had an annual physical check up every year, but was never told of any abnormal blood results. After I immigrated to the U.S., my lifestyle suddenly changed from one meal per day to three meals consisting of mainly grains with little fat and protein. I gained about 25 pounds (11 kg) in a couple of years, my weight did not continue going up. My heaviest was about 145 pounds (66 kg). When I was diagnosed with diabetes in Dec 2004: Weight: 142 pounds (64 kg) Height: 5 feet 4 inches (163 cm) HbA1c: 9.4 FG: 214 I was told to exercise, so I started yoga shortly after my diagnose. I lost about 10 pounds (5 kg) and 2 inches (5 cm) from my waist but still required metformin. In the spring of 2005, I relocated to Galveston from Houston because of my work as an engineer. My endocrinologist sent me to a nutritionist who measured my after meal glucose in her office, it was near 200 mg/dl (11.1 mmol/l) three hours after lunch which was only one low-fat pita bread. I was devastated, my previous family doctor always told me that if I exercise daily, my blood sugar will come down to normal, so Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Are You 'skinny Fat'?

Diabetes Symptoms: Are You 'skinny Fat'?

On the outside, youre an average Joe with a normal build and a pant size thats readily available. But on the inside its a different story. The term "skinny fat is a phrase used to describe people who look fit and healthy on the surface yet, due to a lack of exercise or poor diet, have a slew of health problems brewing beneath it. One study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found nearly one in four skinny people have pre-diabetes and are metabolically obese. In other words, are skinny fat. Heres the thing: diabetes is the fastest-growing chronic health problem plaguing Aussies, yet many of us wouldnt know how to spot if we were at risk of the deadly disease. One Australian is diagnosed with diabetes every five minutes. Of those, 85-95 per cent will be diagnosed with type 2, a condition thats both deadly and preventable. Sof Andrikopoulos, CEO of the Australian Diabetes Society, describes type 1 and type 2 diabetes as diseases of the pancreas, in which the pancreas is unable to secrete enough insulin to regulate the glucose levels in our blood. With type 1, the immune system actually kills the cells that produce insulin so theres a complete deficiency. With type 2, the insulin-producing cells dont work efficiently so theres a relative deficiency. Type 2 used to typically affect men and women who were over 55. Thats all changed now, Andrikopoulos says: When I started in diabetes research 25 years ago, you had to be over 55 to get type 2 but now were seeing it in young adults, adolescents and even in children under 10. It all comes down to our lifestyle the majority of patients with type 2 diabetes are obese. To stop type 2 diabetes taking hold, be aware of signs that might indicate a fast-track to diagnosis. Left undiagnosed and untreated, type Continue reading >>

Can Thin People Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Thin People Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Almost 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, according to government statistics, and it's known that carrying excess weight ups your diabetes risk. The reason is that fat interferes with your ability to use insulin — insulin moves sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells, which need the sugar for energy. But don't think you're off the hook if you're thin — you still can be at risk for type 2 diabetes, even if you're not heavy. The risk for developing type 2 diabetes may be smaller if you're thin, but it's still real, especially if you're older, says Christopher Case, MD, who specializes in endocrinology in Jefferson City, Mo. It's not known exactly how many thin or normal-weight people have type 2 diabetes, but part of that may be because there is no standard definition for "thin," Dr. Case says. "They may not look obese," Case says, but any excess weight, especially around the stomach, is a risk factor. One of the reasons people can have high blood sugar and develop diabetes whether they're thin or obese is because weight, though a contributing factor, is not the only factor. Type 2 Diabetes Could Be in Your Genes Genetics plays a role in developing type 2 diabetes. Studies show that people who have a close relative (parent or sibling) with type 2 diabetes have a greater than three times higher risk of developing the disease than those with no family history, Case says. Genetics may explain why some people who are thin develop type 2 diabetes and why an obese person might not, he says. African-Americans, Asians, Hispanics, and Native Americans also are at greater risk for type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle Choices Raise Your Diabetes Risk These other risk factors, often associated with people who are overweight, can plague thin people, too Continue reading >>

‘obesity Paradox’: Why Being Thin With Diabetes Is A Dangerous Combo

‘obesity Paradox’: Why Being Thin With Diabetes Is A Dangerous Combo

Being overweight or obese is a risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes, but it turns out that these heavier patients may have an advantage: people who are overweight when they are diagnosed with diabetes live longer than their thinner peers. The so-called obesity paradox, in which being overweight appears to be protective against early death, has been seen before in heart failure and chronic kidney disease. But, says study author Mercedes Carnethon, associate professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University, that doesn’t necessarily mean that gaining excess weight is a healthy strategy; rather, it may be that people who are thin when they develop diabetes are already be vulnerable to worse health. “We hypothesized that their diabetes may be different,” she says. “They may have developed diabetes for reasons unrelated to obesity. Overall, about 85% of people with diabetes are heavy. Gaining too much weight is a major contributor to Type 2 diabetes, since excess fat cells can affect the way the body breaks down glucose and produces insulin, but some normal weight individuals can develop the disease as well. The elderly and people of Asian descent are more likely to be at normal weight when diagnosed, for example. (MORE: Doctors Should Screen All Adults for Obesity, U.S. Panel Says) For the new study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Carnethon and her team reviewed data on five previous studies that were tracking people for heart disease risk factors. The studies, which were conducted between 1990 and 2011, included 2,625 people who were recently diagnosed with diabetes, about 12% of whom were at normal weight. The lean patients looked metabolically similar to those who were obese, with the exception of their weight Continue reading >>

One-third Of Slim American Adults Have Pre-diabetes

One-third Of Slim American Adults Have Pre-diabetes

Among normal-weight individuals, those who were inactive were more likely to have an A1C level of 5.7 or higher, which is considered to be pre-diabetic Among all the normal-weight inactive participants (aged 20 and over), about one-quarter were either pre-diabetic or diabetic When only those inactive people aged 40 and over were analyzed, the percentage rose to 40 percent Inactivity increases your risk of pre-diabetes even if you’re not overweight or obese By Dr. Mercola It's often assumed that in order to develop type 2 diabetes, you have to be overweight. While it's true that excess weight is clearly associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, it's the insulin resistance — not necessarily the weight gain — that drives the disease. As such, many people with a healthy weight are not metabolically healthy, putting them at risk of diseases like type 2 diabetes — even without being overweight or obese. One of the greatest risk factors, according to University of Florida researchers, is actually inactivity, which drives up your risk of pre-diabetes regardless of your weight. Inactivity Is Associated With Pre-Diabetes, Even if You're a Healthy Weight If you were looking for motivation to get moving, this study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, is as good as it gets.1 In a survey of more than 1,100 healthy-weight individuals, those who were inactive (physically active for less than 30 minutes per week) were more likely to have an A1C level of 5.7 or higher, which is considered to be pre-diabetic. Among all the inactive participants (aged 20 and over), about one-quarter were either pre-diabetic or diabetic. When only those inactive people aged 40 and over were analyzed, the percentage rose to 40 percent. The researchers suggested that peop Continue reading >>

Why Thin People Get Type 2 Diabetes

Why Thin People Get Type 2 Diabetes

While it’s true that being overweight is a primary risk factor for type 2 diabetes, it’s also true that slender individuals can develop diabetes. Thin people seem to burn the calories they consume, and don’t appear to have fatty muscles that interfere with glucose delivery. However, because there are genetic and other risk factors associated with type 2 onset, even rail-thin people can have high blood sugar. Genes vs Lifestyle A study published in 2014 compared lifestyle interventions to genetic testing for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Though it was already known that both genetic and lifestyle factors influence diabetes onset, the researchers wondered if lifestyle factors - such as lack of exercise, or poor diet - raised a person’s genetic diabetes risk. The investigation revealed obesity increased the risk for type 2 diabetes whatever the person’s underlying genetic risk level. Further, it showed that for those who are younger and leaner, genes are more influential than lifestyle factors in the development of diabetes. Muscle and Fat Another issue that may put people of normal weight at risk for diabetes is their fitness level. Not all thin individuals exercise regularly, or even eat well. A sedentary lifestyle, combined with a diet high in processed foods could theoretically make someone thin on the outside, but fat on the inside. Although their actual weight is in the normal range, the ratio between their muscle and fat cells might be skewed enough to instigate insulin resistance. Lean, but otherwise healthy children of type 2 diabetics might also inherit a genetic defect that disrupts their mitochondria's function. People with this defect burn glucose and fatty acids inefficiently, leading to an accumulation of muscle fat that disrupts insulin signa Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Women: Young, Slim, And Diabetic

Type 2 Diabetes In Women: Young, Slim, And Diabetic

Type 2 Diabetes in Women: Young, Slim, and Diabetic Type 2 diabetes is threatening a new group of people: seemingly fit women. Stephanie Yi, 29, had a body most women would kill for. She never had to work hard to maintain her long-limbed, flat-bellied frameweekend hikes near her northern California home and lots of spinach salads did the trick. She could easily afford to indulge her sweet tooth with the occasional buttery, sugary snack. At 5'7" and 120 pounds, she had, she figured, hit the good-genes jackpot. But everything changed two years ago, when a crippling fatigue left her sidelined from college classes. Listless, she dragged herself to a doctor, who suspected a thyroid imbalance. A blood test and a few days later, she received the alarming results: Her thyroid was fine; her blood sugar levels were not. She was prediabetic and on the cusp of developing type 2. Stephanie was stunned. Of course, she'd heard diabetes was a health crisis. (At last count, 26 million Americans had the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.) But weren't type 2 diabetics fat, sedentary, and on junk-food-and-soda diets? Stephanie hadn't been to a drive-through in ages; she didn't touch meat. Yet, somehow, she'd gotten an illness most slim women dodge. The CDC estimates that one in nine adults has diabetes and, if current trends continue, one in three will be diabetic by the year 2050. For decades, typical type 2 patients were close to what Stephanie pictured: heavy and inactive. They were also older, often receiving a diagnosis in middle age or beyond. But while such type 2 cases continue to skyrocket, there has been a disturbing increase in a much younger set. The number of diabetes-related hospitalizations among people in their thirties has doubled in the Continue reading >>

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