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Skinny Type 2 Diabetes

Let’s Stop Type 2 Diabetes

Let’s Stop Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is raging out of control around the world. It is the fastest spreading medical condition of our time. Currently, it affects more than 10% of the world’s population – and by the end of this decade (just seven short years from now), it will affect one-in-three people. It used to be a condition that only affected the elderly, but Type 2 is now afflicting children at an alarming rate. Kids as young as nine-years-old are already stricken with diabetic complications, such as high blood pressure, artery disease, obesity and kidney problems. Because of Type 2 diabetes, children born after the year 2000 will be the first generation in human history to have a shorter lifespan than their parents. A Simple Solution To Type 2 Diabetes Friends, this is a very serious health problem — and doctors seem powerless to stop it. But there is a simple solution to Type 2 diabetes that involves improving one’s diet and lifestyle. This solution requires no doctor bills, no drugs and no medical interventions. And this do-it-yourself diabetes solution appears to be much more effective than the medical treatments currently being administered by doctors these days. Today, I am dedicating this blog post to everyone who has Type 2 diabetes — and to your family members, loved ones and friends who want to be free of this terrible condition. My guest for today’s blog is the popular author, health coach and activist known as “Jim Healthy.” Jim is the co-author of the bestselling book, The 30-Day Diabetes Cure, which is the most popular and most successful diabetes-reversing plan of all time. Jim is also the founder and editor of the website, MyHealingKitchen.com – which teaches his 140,000 readers about the best foods and diets for healing and reversing today’s leading Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight With Type 2 Diabetes

How To Gain Weight With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a complicated and dangerous disease in which blood sugar levels are often too high, which can cause dizziness, increased thirst and heart problems. Diabetics need to make sure to control their weights and be neither too heavy nor too thin. If you have diabetes and need to gain weight, be aware that gaining too much weight, fat especially, can worsen the symptoms of diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic. Instead, you need to eat the right foods, exercise and take good care of yourself to safely gain weight. Video of the Day Increase the calories in your diet while watching your carbohydrate intake. Gaining weight is simply a matter of eating more calories than you burn, but having diabetes complicates the equation because it’s not safe for diabetics to eat whatever foods they want. The Mayo Clinic recommends limiting sweets like candy and chocolate, as they can spike your blood sugar levels too quickly, and instead of eating foods with refined carbohydrates like white rice, white bread and pasta, eat more whole grains like whole wheat bread, proteins like chicken and fats like olive oil. Continue to check your blood sugar levels as often as your doctor or dietitian recommends. Eat more plant sources of fat while continuing to limit animal sources of fat. Since type 2 diabetics are at a higher risk of heart disease, the Mayo Clinic recommends that they limit their intake of fat from animals, such as beef, bacon, whole milk and butter. Instead, olive oil, nuts and avocados are all high in calories, but contain healthy unsaturated fats. Start lifting weights or using resistance bands to strength-train at home. You can try bicep curls, push-ups, squats with weights in your hand, and any other strength-training exercise. If you are going to gain weight, make su Continue reading >>

Are You A Skinny Fat Person? 10 Steps To Cure The Skinny Fat Syndrome

Are You A Skinny Fat Person? 10 Steps To Cure The Skinny Fat Syndrome

The common wisdom is that if you are overweight you are unhealthy, and if you are thin, you are healthy. But new research points to just how dangerous being skinny can be — if you are a “skinny fat” person, that is. The medical term for this is “MONW,” or metabolically obese normal weight, which I prefer to refer to as being a skinny fat person. It means you are under lean but over fat — not enough muscle and too much fat (especially belly fat). It seems it is better to be fat and fit than thin and out of shape. While we know that 68 percent of the American population is overweight, and that most have diabesity — being somewhere on the continuum of pre-diabetes to Type 2 diabetes — the shocking news from a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association is that nearly 1 in 4 skinny people have pre-diabetes and are “metabolically obese.” What’s worse is that if you are a skinny fat person and get diagnosed with diabetes, you have twice the risk of death than if you are overweight when diagnosed with diabetes. Perhaps having that extra muscle on your body from having to carry around those extra pounds protects you. Studies on teenagers found that 37 percent of the skinny kids had one or more signs of pre-diabetes such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar, or high cholesterol. Wait — almost four out of 10 normal-weight kids are pre-diabetic? It is bad enough that one-third of kids are overweight or obese in America, but now it appears that only about 20 percent of children in America are healthy. In other words, 8 out of 10 children in America are overweight or have pre-diabetes or Type 2 diabetes. In my medical practice I see this all the time. Jim came in for a “wellness check up” and felt happy about his weight. His BMI Continue reading >>

How A Thin Diabetic Reversed Her Type 2 Diabetes

How A Thin Diabetic Reversed Her Type 2 Diabetes

I received a letter from reader Sarah, who has successfully used low-carbohydrate high-fat diets and intermittent fasting to reverse her type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, she is not particularly overweight as measured by body mass index, yet still suffered from T2D. At her heaviest, she only had a BMI of 24.9, which puts her in the ‘normal’ range. She writes: The letter I immigrated to US from P.R. China in the end of 1998 when I was 31 years old; I weighed about 55 kg (121 lbs). While I was in China, I lived thousands of miles away from my family, so I had sort of an intermittent fasting life style from age 19 to 31 years old. The meals in China were mostly vegetables and very little protein. I had an annual physical check up every year, but was never told of any abnormal blood results. After I immigrated to the U.S., my lifestyle suddenly changed from one meal per day to three meals consisting of mainly grains with little fat and protein. I gained about 25 pounds (11 kg) in a couple of years, my weight did not continue going up. My heaviest was about 145 pounds (66 kg). When I was diagnosed with diabetes in Dec 2004: Weight: 142 pounds (64 kg) Height: 5 feet 4 inches (163 cm) HbA1c: 9.4 FG: 214 I was told to exercise, so I started yoga shortly after my diagnose. I lost about 10 pounds (5 kg) and 2 inches (5 cm) from my waist but still required metformin. In the spring of 2005, I relocated to Galveston from Houston because of my work as an engineer. My endocrinologist sent me to a nutritionist who measured my after meal glucose in her office, it was near 200 mg/dl (11.1 mmol/l) three hours after lunch which was only one low-fat pita bread. I was devastated, my previous family doctor always told me that if I exercise daily, my blood sugar will come down to normal, so Continue reading >>

Why Do Some Skinny People Develop Type 2 Diabetes?

Why Do Some Skinny People Develop Type 2 Diabetes?

For years, doctors have pondered why some thin individuals develop type 2 diabetes, while certain obese people aren’t stricken with the blood sugar disorder. Now, new findings published in the journal Cell Metabolism show that a buildup of toxic fats in the blood may make some folks more prone to developing the metabolic condition—regardless of their weight, body type or dietary disposition, ScienceDaily reports. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not make enough insulin, a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar in the body. While numerous studies show that being overweight, eating an unhealthy diet or consuming excessive amounts of sweets can dramatically increase a person’s likelihood of acquiring the disorder, these risk factors don’t automatically lead to diabetes for everyone, which has perplexed the health care community for decades. For the three-year study, researchers at the University of Utah’s College of Health reviewed health data from a group of obese patients in Singapore who underwent gastric bypass surgery. Some individuals suffered from type 2 diabetes and some didn’t. Scientists found that patients who didn’t suffer from type 2 diabetes had fewer ceramides in their fat tissue. (Ceramides are a toxic class of metabolites that may make people prone to type 2 diabetes.) Scientists theorized that ceramides—which affect the way the body handles nutrients—could push excess fat into the bloodstream and disrupt metabolic function. To test this theory, researchers added excess ceramides to the fat cells of humanized mice to see its effects. Researchers found that the addition of these substances eventually caused the rodents to become unresponsive to insulin and impaired their ability to burn calories. “Some people are just not m Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Strike—hard—even When Weight Is Normal

Diabetes Can Strike—hard—even When Weight Is Normal

We tend to think of type 2 diabetes as a disease that afflicts people who are overweight. But it can also appear in people with perfectly healthy weights—and be more deadly in them. A study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association indicates that normal-weight people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have double the risk of dying from heart disease and other causes than overweight people with diabetes. Such apparent “protection” by excess weight has been called the obesity paradox. It’s been seen with other conditions, like heart failure and end-stage kidney disease. Overweight or obese people with these conditions seem to fare better or live longer than their normal-weight counterparts. That doesn’t mean gaining weight is a healthy strategy. Instead, it probably means that something else besides weight—like the amount of fat around the waist—may be contributing to the onset and severity of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes types There are two basic types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body stops making insulin. This happens when the immune system mistakenly attacks insulin-making cells in the pancreas. Without insulin, cells can’t absorb sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream. The resulting high sugar levels in the blood damages nerves, arteries, and other tissues. Type 1 diabetes often appears early in life, but can happen later. People with type 1 diabetes must take insulin. Type 2 diabetes occurs when cells become resistant to insulin’s “open up for sugar” signal. Exactly why this happens is still something of a mystery. But excess weight contributes to it, since fat cells affect how the body uses glucose and produces insulin. Lack of physical activity also plays a role. Medications that make muscle and other cells mor Continue reading >>

Thin Diabetes, Fat Diabetes

Thin Diabetes, Fat Diabetes

How can a high-​carb diet lower your blood sugar? If you are healthy, your blood sugar will stay within a narrow range, regardless of how much carbohydrate you eat. But in people with diabetes mellitus, the amount of a sugar called glucose rises to dangerously high levels in the bloodstream. There are two main types of diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes (thin diabetes) results when the pancreas loses its ability to make a hormone called insulin. People with thin diabetes need to take insulin by injection. Type 2 diabetes (fat diabetes) results when the body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin. Much of the glucose in the bloodstream comes from the sugars and starches in the food. For this reason, many people think that people with diabetes need to eat low-​carbohydrate diets. Yet scientists have known since the 1930s that the more carbohydrate you eat, the more sensitive your body becomes to the effects of insulin. The more fat you eat, the less sensitive your body becomes to insulin. When people with thin diabetes switch to a low-​fat, high-​carbohydrate diet, they typically have to reduce their insulin dosage. When people with fat diabetes switch to a low-​fat, high-​carbohydrate diet, they lose weight and become undiabetic. Continue reading >>

Skinny And 119 Pounds, But With The Health Hallmarks Of Obesity

Skinny And 119 Pounds, But With The Health Hallmarks Of Obesity

Claire Walker Johnson of Queens was a medical mystery. No matter how much she ate, she never gained weight. And yet Ms. Johnson, with a long narrow face, had the conditions many obese people develop — Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and, most strikingly, a liver buried in fat. She and a very small group of very thin people like her have given scientists surprising clues to one of the most important questions about obesity: Why do fat people often develop serious and sometimes life-threatening medical conditions? The answer has little to do with the fat itself. It’s about each person’s ability to store it. With that understanding, scientists are now working on drug treatments to protect people from excess unstored fat and spare them from dire medical conditions. The need is clear. One in three Americans and one in four adults worldwide have at least three conditions associated with obesity such as diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure — a combination of disorders that doubles their risk of heart attacks and strokes. In addition, 2 percent to 3 percent of adults in America, or at least five million people, have a grave accumulation of fat in their livers caused by obesity that can lead to liver failure. The detective work that led to this new scientific understanding of fat began with a small group of scientists curious about a disorder that can be caused by a gene mutation so rare it is estimated to affect just one in 10 million people, including, it turned out, Ms. Johnson. For much of her life, Ms. Johnson, 55, had no idea anything was amiss. Yes, she was very thin and always ravenous, but in Jamaica, where she was born, many children were skinny, she says, and no one thought much of it. She seemed healthy, and she developed Continue reading >>

About Diabetes

About Diabetes

You have probably heard quite a few things about "Diabetes," mostly as a general umbrella term thrown around by the mass media, from news articles, to well-intentioned television hosts. Based on what these folks say, you probably have a very basic, limited understanding of the disease, and it's probably in alarmist terms: Something along the lines of... "335 million people, worldwide, have it, with around 2% of Americans walking around, undiagnosed, not knowing they have high blood "sugar" (with little explanation of what blood "sugar" is)... and oh, my god, the obesity epidemic is skyrocketting, and seriously, you people need to lose weight, and yadda, yadda, yadda, yadda... Stop eating sugary food, and McDonald's... because in the 'near future', estimated figures "predict" as much as 75% of people will be developing "Diabetes"." What's worse is that these alarmist outlets leave you with the impression that a.) There's only one type of Diabetes, b.) all Diabetes is the same, c.) Diabetes is very straightforward and easy to understand, d.) all people gave themselves this disease (or gave their kids this disease) because they're slackers, or poor parents, e.) if they weren't such slackers, they could cure themselves with diet and exercise, gastric bypass, or some miracle supplement or special raw diet being promoted online, and f.) if people aren't diagnosed, it's their own fault for not paying enough attention. There are SO MANY things that are wrong with this scenario! 1. Diabetes is NOT straightforward. Diabetes is a very complex spectrum of diseases, with many etiologies, and a variety of treatments... It is attended to by many EXTREMELY uneducated medical 'professionals'! (This is why so many people run undiagnosed, by the way... It should bother you. A LOT. It is N Continue reading >>

Why Do Skinny People Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Why Do Skinny People Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Of all the misconceptions about type 2 diabetes one of the worst is, “Only overweight people get diabetes.” What some may fail to realize is that there is a genetic risk factor associated with type 2 diabetes. A new study is taking a closer look at lifestyle interventions versus genetic testing in preventing type 2 diabetes. We know that type 2 diabetes results from a combination of both genetic and lifestyle factors, but we don’t know if adverse lifestyles, like being overweight or sedentary, increase an individual’s underlying genetic risk of diabetes. “If, for example, obese individuals with a high level of genetic risk have a higher risk of developing diabetes than obese individuals with a low level of genetic risk, then preventative strategies that target lifestyle interventions to obese individuals with a high genetic risk would be more effective than strategies that target all obese individuals,” says the study. Researchers found that genetics played a larger role than lifestyle factors in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in those who were younger and leaner. Most importantly, the research showed that the risk of type 2 diabetes increased in those who were obese whatever their level of genetic risk. Is it in your genes? The American Diabetes Association reports that type 2 diabetes has a stronger link to family history and lineage than type 1. “Lifestyle also influences the development of type 2 diabetes. Obesity tends to run in families, and families tend to have similar eating and exercise habits,” says the ADA. “If you have a family history of type 2 diabetes, it may be difficult to figure out whether your diabetes is due to lifestyle factors or genetic susceptibility. Most likely it is due to both. However, don’t lose heart. Studies Continue reading >>

‘obesity Paradox’: Why Being Thin With Diabetes Is A Dangerous Combo

‘obesity Paradox’: Why Being Thin With Diabetes Is A Dangerous Combo

Being overweight or obese is a risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes, but it turns out that these heavier patients may have an advantage: people who are overweight when they are diagnosed with diabetes live longer than their thinner peers. The so-called obesity paradox, in which being overweight appears to be protective against early death, has been seen before in heart failure and chronic kidney disease. But, says study author Mercedes Carnethon, associate professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University, that doesn’t necessarily mean that gaining excess weight is a healthy strategy; rather, it may be that people who are thin when they develop diabetes are already be vulnerable to worse health. “We hypothesized that their diabetes may be different,” she says. “They may have developed diabetes for reasons unrelated to obesity. Overall, about 85% of people with diabetes are heavy. Gaining too much weight is a major contributor to Type 2 diabetes, since excess fat cells can affect the way the body breaks down glucose and produces insulin, but some normal weight individuals can develop the disease as well. The elderly and people of Asian descent are more likely to be at normal weight when diagnosed, for example. (MORE: Doctors Should Screen All Adults for Obesity, U.S. Panel Says) For the new study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Carnethon and her team reviewed data on five previous studies that were tracking people for heart disease risk factors. The studies, which were conducted between 1990 and 2011, included 2,625 people who were recently diagnosed with diabetes, about 12% of whom were at normal weight. The lean patients looked metabolically similar to those who were obese, with the exception of their weight Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas by special cells, called beta cells. The pancreas is below and behind the stomach. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells. Inside the cells, glucose is stored and later used for energy. When you have type 2 diabetes, your fat, liver, and muscle cells do not respond correctly to insulin. This is called insulin resistance. As a result, blood sugar does not get into these cells to be stored for energy. When sugar cannot enter cells, a high level of sugar builds up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia. The body is unable to use the glucose for energy. This leads to the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes usually develops slowly over time. Most people with the disease are overweight or obese when they are diagnosed. Increased fat makes it harder for your body to use insulin the correct way. Type 2 diabetes can also develop in people who are thin. This is more common in older adults. Family history and genes play a role in type 2 diabetes. Low activity level, poor diet, and excess body weight around the waist increase your chance of getting the disease. Continue reading >>

Are You ‘skinny Fat’?

Are You ‘skinny Fat’?

The common wisdom is that if you’re overweight you're unhealthy, and if you’re thin, you're healthy. New research says otherwise. On the outside, you’re an average Joe with a normal build and a pant size that’s readily available. But on the inside – it’s a different story. The term "skinny fat” is a phrase used to describe people who look fit and healthy on the surface yet, due to a lack of exercise or poor diet, have a slew of health problems brewing beneath it. One study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found nearly one in four skinny people have pre-diabetes and are “metabolically obese.” In other words, are skinny fat. Here’s the thing: diabetes is the fastest-growing chronic health problem plaguing Aussies, yet many of us wouldn’t know how to spot if we were at risk of the deadly disease. One Australian is diagnosed with diabetes every five minutes. Of those, 85-95 per cent will be diagnosed with type 2, a condition that’s both deadly and preventable. Sof Andrikopoulos, CEO of the Australian Diabetes Society, describes type 1 and type 2 diabetes as diseases of the pancreas, in which the pancreas is unable to secrete enough insulin to regulate the glucose levels in our blood. “With type 1, the immune system actually kills the cells that produce insulin so there’s a complete deficiency. With type 2, the insulin-producing cells don’t work efficiently so there’s a relative deficiency.” Type 2 used to typically affect men and women who were over 55. That’s all changed now, Andrikopoulos says: “When I started in diabetes research 25 years ago, you had to be over 55 to get type 2 but now we’re seeing it in young adults, adolescents and even in children under 10. It all comes down to our lifestyle – the Continue reading >>

Even A Thin Person Can Get Diabetes

Even A Thin Person Can Get Diabetes

Print Font: One of my most enduring childhood images is from a newspaper clipping. The grainy photograph freezes a lanky teen named Tom O'Connell launching a hook shot from his right thigh. Tucker, as he was known, led a team from tiny Merchantville High School in scoring and rebounding during an improbable run to the South Jersey Championship. New Jersey had its own version of Hoosiers in 1952, and for that one season, my father was his team's Jimmy Chitwood. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. In February 2008, I arrive at a nursing home in the San Fernando Valley to visit the man in that photograph, a man I've neither seen nor spoken to in 20 years. Entering his room, I barely recognize the gaunt face. Where his right thigh should be sits a corduroy pant leg, gathered up and bobby-pinned. The spindly arm he extends to greet me is splotched with blood bursts. Once 6'3'' and 215 pounds, he's now a cadaverous-looking 145. The only cheerful note in the room is a balloon tied to the metal bed frame. His 73rd birthday was last week, apparently. It's a detail I had long since forgotten. Like a man looking into a foggy mirror, my father strains to recognize me. But if he is staring into his past, I might be peering into my future. I'm 6'6'' and weigh 220, with 12 percent body fat and the outline of abs above a 32-inch waist. Yet diabetes has me in its crosshairs as well. If you think being thin gives you a fr Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Women: Young, Slim, And Diabetic

Type 2 Diabetes In Women: Young, Slim, And Diabetic

Stephanie Yi, 29, had a body most women would kill for. She never had to work hard to maintain her long-limbed, flat-bellied frame—weekend hikes near her northern California home and lots of spinach salads did the trick. She could easily afford to indulge her sweet tooth with the occasional buttery, sugary snack. At 5'7" and 120 pounds, she had, she figured, hit the good-genes jackpot. But everything changed two years ago, when a crippling fatigue left her sidelined from college classes. Listless, she dragged herself to a doctor, who suspected a thyroid imbalance. A blood test and a few days later, she received the alarming results: Her thyroid was fine; her blood sugar levels were not. She was prediabetic and on the cusp of developing type 2. Stephanie was stunned. Of course, she'd heard diabetes was a health crisis. (At last count, 26 million Americans had the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.) But weren't type 2 diabetics fat, sedentary, and on junk-food-and-soda diets? Stephanie hadn't been to a drive-through in ages; she didn't touch meat. Yet, somehow, she'd gotten an illness most slim women dodge. A Growing Threat The CDC estimates that one in nine adults has diabetes and, if current trends continue, one in three will be diabetic by the year 2050. For decades, typical type 2 patients were close to what Stephanie pictured: heavy and inactive. They were also older, often receiving a diagnosis in middle age or beyond. But while such type 2 cases continue to skyrocket, there has been a disturbing increase in a much younger set. The number of diabetes-related hospitalizations among people in their thirties has doubled in the past decade, with women 1.3 times more likely to be admitted than men. Perhaps even more troubling is the e Continue reading >>

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