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Skinny Diabetic Needs To Gain Weight

Keeping The Pounds On: Strategies For Gaining Weight

Keeping The Pounds On: Strategies For Gaining Weight

If one of your goals is to gain weight, it helps to have a game plan in mind. Just as there are smart, sensible ways to lose weight, there are strategies for gaining weight in a healthful way. Loading up on sugary, fatty foods may certainly put the pounds on, but common sense tells us that scarfing down bowls of ice cream every day won’t win you the dietitian seal of approval. The key, as always, is to focus on nutrient-rich (and in this case, higher-calorie) foods, whether you’re trying to gain, lose, or maintain your weight. The other consideration, of course, is your diabetes. You need to consider the effect of increased food intake on your blood glucose control. Calories count While it’s usually not necessary to count calories, it does help to have an understanding of A) how many calories you need (approximately) to gain (or lose) weight and B) how many calories are in the foods you eat. While somewhat simplistic and not entirely accurate, one guideline you can keep in mind is that it takes approximately 3500 calories to gain one pound. It follows, then, that to put on one pound in a week, you must increase your daily food intake by 500 calories. There are a number of online calorie calculators that can give you a sense of how many calories you need, based on factors such as your age, gender, height, weight, and activity level. A few to check out are the Mayo Clinic calculator, the My-calorie-counter.com calculator, and the FreeDieting.com calculator. Once you have a sense of where you stand with your calorie needs, you can find nutrition information from any number of Web sites, including CalorieKing and SelfNutritionData, for example. You can also purchase a food counts book and, of course, don’t forget to read food labels for calories, carb grams, and fat Continue reading >>

How Can An Underweight Diabetic Gain Weight?

How Can An Underweight Diabetic Gain Weight?

My father-in-law is about 5ft. 10", weighs 126 pounds, and cannot seem to gain weight but shows fasting blood glucose levels of 150 to 190 with 1.25mg of Micronase taken daily. Most information on diabetic diets addresses the problem of being overweight and how to lose weight. He has the opposite problem. Could you direct us to information on how to address this problem and understand the possible mechanisms involved? His fasting blood glucose levels for the past several years were steadily at 129. Now that he's being more aggressive in treatment, it seems his fasting blood glucose levels have increased. Dr. Gourmet Says... We do see this problem fairly often. Many times as folks age they will lose weight, but there is also the factor that when a patient's diabetes is not well controlled it can lead to weight loss as well. This is a case where you and your father-in-law should speak with his physician about seeing a dietitian. Liberalizing his diet by adding in the right balance of carbs and protein for his case is best handled by those who are close to him. The dietitians do a fantastic job of coordinating with patient's doctors to make sure that as he gets more calories, his medication is increased so that he can regulate his blood sugars carefully. Weight gain is about making sure that one is getting more calories than are being burned (just the opposite of weight loss). That said, it can be a struggle for diabetics to eat more and at the same time watch their blood sugar carefully. There's good research showing that sometimes folks who are older just don't eat enough calories. A food diary can help a lot in assessing this and taking that with you to the dietitian can make his visits more productive. Lastly, if there's been a substantial weight loss, checking for oth Continue reading >>

Meals To Help Diabetics Gain Weight

Meals To Help Diabetics Gain Weight

Gaining weight while controlling your blood sugar can be very difficult for those with diabetes. The key to a healthy weight gain is to recognize which foods affect your blood sugar and which do not. For weight gain that also allows consistent blood sugar control, add more healthy fats to your diet. Video of the Day The first step to a healthy diabetic diet is consistent carbohydrate intake at each meal. The American Diabetes Association generally recommends about 45 to 60 grams of total carbohydrates per meal, but this may vary for each individual. Foods that contain carbohydrates include, but are not limited to, grains, starchy vegetables, fruits, milk products, snack foods and sweets. Portion control of these foods is very important because too many high-carbohydrate foods will spike your blood sugar. Nonstarchy vegetables such as leafy greens, broccoli, eggplant, peppers and cabbage have fewer carbohydrates per serving and will not spike your blood sugar as much as starchy ones. The American Diabetes Association recommends at least three to five servings of nonstarchy vegetables per day. Fats and Weight Gain Fats can be categorized as "unhealthy" or "healthy." According to the American Heart Association, unhealthy fats include saturated and trans fats, which can contribute to increased cholesterol and should be avoided. These include high-fat cuts of meat and high-fat dairy products. Trans fats are not naturally occurring and are added to foods by the manufacturer. Fats contain 9 calories per gram, whereas protein and carbohydrates only contain 4 calories per gram.To gain weight, consume more calories than you are expending. Healthy Fats: Monounsaturated and Omega-3 Healthy fats can assist you in gaining weight, while controlling your blood sugar and cholesterol lev Continue reading >>

Skinny People Get Type 2 Diabetes Too: 10st 7lb Man Who Exercised Regularly Is Stunned To Learn He Has The Condition - Which He Then Reversed In 11 Days With New Diet

Skinny People Get Type 2 Diabetes Too: 10st 7lb Man Who Exercised Regularly Is Stunned To Learn He Has The Condition - Which He Then Reversed In 11 Days With New Diet

When I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes four years ago I was stunned. I’d gone for a check-up, and a routine blood test said it all: diabetes. But it made no sense. As a healthy 59-year-old, who went running, played regular cricket, drank moderately (2 units a week) and only weighed 10st 7lb, I was hardly overweight. In fact, at 5ft 7in, my Body Mass Index (BMI) was a healthy 21. Yes, I did overeat sometimes – I was thin and thought I could eat what I liked within reason – but it was mainly healthy food, few ready meals, semi-skimmed milk, grilled rather than fried food, chicken rather than red meat and lots of fresh veg. But over the past two years I had been under a lot of stress: my dad had recently died from prostate cancer, my job had changed radically, and I’d been on high blood pressure pills for a year. Stress can raise your blood sugar levels. But I still thought my diabetes diagnosis was ridiculous – how could someone with my weight and healthy lifestyle be facing the prospect of all the serious complications of type 2 diabetes in ten years’ time, including sight loss and a much greater risk of early death? My GP told me I could control my condition with diet, and gave me a long list of healthy foods and their glycaemic load (the effect each food has on your blood sugar level). After six months on this, my blood sugar level had dropped from 9mmol to 7, although this was still well above 6, the level at which type 2 diabetes is diagnosed. I wanted to be free of diabetes, not just control it. So I researched online and discovered the work of Professor Roy Taylor at Newcastle University. Type 2 is linked to fat clogging up the liver and pancreas, and Professor Taylor had shown that a very low calorie diet could reverse this. I had to try it. I chose Continue reading >>

Low Carb Weight Gain Diet For Diabetes

Low Carb Weight Gain Diet For Diabetes

Marie says: “I love all your information and it is so helpful ……but I need to gain weight without carbs and I am having a hard time.” While weight loss is an aim that is most common for people with type 2 diabetes, some people, like Marie, want to achieve weight gain or maintain their current weight without losing anymore. And as Marie clearly pointed out, this can be a bit tough when you choose to follow a lower carb diet. You see, those high carb foods that send your blood sugar soaring – sugar, rice, potatoes, pasta and bread – also happen to be loaded with calories. So when they get the cut, your blood sugar levels go down, which is great. But, suddenly you're stuck with eating non starchy vegetables (which is awesome) but you'll be dropping lots of calories and weight, too. If weight loss is your goal, all very well. If not, you can find you're dropping too much weight too quick and being too thin can also be problematic for your health. So, as promised, we're here to discuss what type of foods to eat so you can maintain or gain the weight you want while still following a low carb diet. Step 1: Increase calories We're all aware of the fact that the amount of food we eat makes a difference. Even when we eat lots of healthy foods, we can still eat too much – leading to weight gain. So it makes sense that what you need to do to gain weight is increase your caloric intake. But, you want to be focusing on doing that by eating nutrient dense real foods, not junk foods. Clearly, this defeats the purpose. Step 2: More fat equals more calories Both carbohydrates and protein contain 4 calories per gram while fat contains 9 calories per gram. Therefore, it makes sense that the easiest way to increase calories is to increase your intake of healthy fats. Healthy f Continue reading >>

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes?

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes?

This article is suitable for anyone interested in improving the look of their body right through to the professional bodybuilder, and athlete looking to improve performance. How do you build muscle? Lift weights? Consume enough protein? Get enough rest? {Repeat} ^ Yes, Pretty much! Everyone has the potential to build muscle over the course of their lifetime. Some people are happy with the level of muscle mass they have while others desire more for performance and aesthetic related reasons. The ability to gain muscle is highly specific to an individual’s genetics, baseline hormone levels and day to day activity. Many of these factors change as we age, reducing our capacity to gain muscle as we age. In other words, Muscle mass increases as we age up until a certain point. The effect of age on work capacity and muscle growth is a complex and lengthy subject. In fact, there is an hour long video module on the topic on the member’s site (coming soon). Anyhow, The best way to stimulate muscle growth is regular weights resistance training or loaded body movement. Even though we perform loaded movements daily, such as Squatting down to pick up our pets, Carrying the groceries to the car, Pushing annoying people ‘out the way.’ Pulling the kids around, Picking things up (hip-hinge) of the ground Day to Day Movement Isn’t Enough. None of these movements load our muscles heavily or frequently enough to stimulate gains in muscle mass. Weights resistance training is an incredibly useful tool for increasing muscle mass, especially with diabetes. The intensity (load) and frequency of training determine the stress placed on the body’s musculature and consequently determine how fast muscle tissue is gained. Training means nothing without recovery. For the body to get the best Continue reading >>

> Weight And Diabetes

> Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it to the muscles. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of it through urine. This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 diabetes have a condition called ins Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

How To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

Expert Reviewed Weight loss can be a symptom of diabetes. Because your body is unable to make use of sugar in the blood, those calories that would normally be utilized are lost. Even though you might be eating a normal amount of food, this loss of sugar and calories due to diabetes will still cause you to lose weight.[1] However, you can still work with your diabetes and maintain a healthy weight. Continue reading >>

Tips To Gain Weight

Tips To Gain Weight

Save for later If you have diabetes and you’re underweight or struggling with your appetite, it’s important to eat the foods you like rather than being too restrictive with your diet. This may mean eating foods that are higher in fat and calories. Speak with your diabetes team to review your medications and talk to a dietitian to help you make any changes. Do you want to put on weight? These are some of the things your dietitian may suggest to help you gain/maintain your weight. Eat smaller meals, more often. You’ll find this easier than eating three large meals and it will also help increase your appetite. Use full-fat dairy products like milk, cream, cheese and yogurt. Add unsaturated fats to your food where you can in foods such as avocados, nuts and seeds, and spreads and oils, including olive, rapeseed, sunflower and peanut. Unsaturated fats are still high in calories, but better for your heart than saturated fats. Serve vegetables with melted butter, spread or grated cheese. Add cream or full-fat milk to foods like mashed potato or soups. Have nourishing drinks like smoothies and milky drinks. Add powdered milk to cereals. Nutritional supplements, in the form of food or drink, can be useful for some people who are finding it hard to gain weight or who have a poor appetite. They are available on prescription. Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight Tips

How To Gain Weight Tips

Weight gain is a sensitive subject as anyone skinny enough to be contemplating weight gain is eyed with suspicion and envy – especially amongst women in whom thinness is particularly celebrated. With only 2% of the US population underweight and a staggering two thirds (66%) overweight, it is easy (though not right) to see why there is such little support. However, while obesity is often the result of poor lifestyle choices, underweight is mostly due to genetics and little to do with poor decision making. Unfortunately, rather than getting a spot empathy, as after all it is out of your control, there is often little understanding or support for those who desire to gain weight. WHAT YOU CAN DO TO GAIN WEIGHT 1. SEE YOUR DOCTOR TO RULE OUT UNDERLYING MEDICAL CONDITIONS Medical conditions, medications and psychological issues may all cause weight loss or difficulty gaining weight. Furthermore, weight loss is common after problems such as injury, food poisoning or seasonal illness. If you have an ectomorphic body type, weight loss tends to be more dramatic and weight gain more difficult. 2. TO GAIN WEIGHT, INCREASE YOUR CALORIE INTAKE BY 20% In other words on top of the calories you need to maintain your weight, consume and extra 20% for weight gain. If you need 2000 calories to maintain your weight, consume 2400 calories to gain weight. You can use the weight gain calculator, which adds an extra 20% and also determines your macronutrient ratio. Read the instructions first. If you find you are not gaining weight with an extra 20% calories, increase your calorie intake in increments of about 100 calories until you experience weight gain. You should be aiming to gain no more than 1 – 2 lbs of weight a week, anymore than this is likely to be unhealthy and mostly fat. 3. GET Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight With Type 2 Diabetes

How To Gain Weight With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a complicated and dangerous disease in which blood sugar levels are often too high, which can cause dizziness, increased thirst and heart problems. Diabetics need to make sure to control their weights and be neither too heavy nor too thin. If you have diabetes and need to gain weight, be aware that gaining too much weight, fat especially, can worsen the symptoms of diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic. Instead, you need to eat the right foods, exercise and take good care of yourself to safely gain weight. Video of the Day Increase the calories in your diet while watching your carbohydrate intake. Gaining weight is simply a matter of eating more calories than you burn, but having diabetes complicates the equation because it’s not safe for diabetics to eat whatever foods they want. The Mayo Clinic recommends limiting sweets like candy and chocolate, as they can spike your blood sugar levels too quickly, and instead of eating foods with refined carbohydrates like white rice, white bread and pasta, eat more whole grains like whole wheat bread, proteins like chicken and fats like olive oil. Continue to check your blood sugar levels as often as your doctor or dietitian recommends. Eat more plant sources of fat while continuing to limit animal sources of fat. Since type 2 diabetics are at a higher risk of heart disease, the Mayo Clinic recommends that they limit their intake of fat from animals, such as beef, bacon, whole milk and butter. Instead, olive oil, nuts and avocados are all high in calories, but contain healthy unsaturated fats. Start lifting weights or using resistance bands to strength-train at home. You can try bicep curls, push-ups, squats with weights in your hand, and any other strength-training exercise. If you are going to gain weight, make su Continue reading >>

The Thin Type 2 Diabetic

The Thin Type 2 Diabetic

Tweet The Thin Type 2 Diabetic—Know Your Insulin A patient arrived in my office last week with confusion and disbelief. For several years, his blood sugar has been in the type 2 diabetes range, with a HgbA1c near 7.5%, and despite his lean, thin build, his doctor told him that weight loss could help his high blood sugar. If you could see Paul, you’d be as confused as he—he has no weight to lose. So why did his doctor blurt such a misguided association? Because his doctor, like you, heard medical claims that too strongly link obesity to type 2. On WebMD, I just read “BMI Biggest Contributor to Increase in Type 2 Diabetes in US.” And another headline, “Type 2 Diabetes Tied to Obesity, but Predisposition to Obesity Poorly Understood.” It is true that if you take the type 2 diabetes population, a greater proportion of them will have central obesity than the non-diabetic public, so it is true, an association is there. But within that same adult type 2 diabetic population, about 39% of them are on the lean and even underweight side of the weight charts. Yes, the thin diabetic represents over a third of all type 2 diabetics! Insulin secretion plays a huge role here and is well explained in Step Three of The Blood Code. In short, those with high insulin gain central body fat easily and those with low to normal insulin don’t. High blood sugar, which is due to the process of insulin resistance, can occur in the presence of high or normal to low insulin, and you have to know which one you are. The high insulin folks gain fat easily and when they develop high blood sugar, they are blamed for gaining weight and causing the problem, yet the high insulin is the root cause of both the weight gain and the subsequent insulin resistance. A low carb diet is paramount to the Continue reading >>

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Cliff Scherb Editor’s Note: Cliff Scherb, Founder of Glucose Advisors and TriStar Athletes LLC, is a nutrition and fitness expert. He consults through virtually teaching his decision support system – Engine1 the app and its methodologies to aspiring T1 individuals and athletes. Cliff also creates custom training programs and insulin plans for endurance athletes, using Training Stress Modeling and real-time coaching. To inquire about coaching openings, FB LIVE sessions, and general questions please email [email protected] Losing weight can be difficult — add Type 1 diabetes to the mix with its daily management demands — and it’s even more of a challenge. I know, because I’ve been a Type 1 diabetic for 29 years and I’m also an endurance athlete. The internet is saturated in advice on how to lose weight with or without Type 1, so it’s hard to know what is worth while and what will just waste your time — or worse, can negatively impact your health. I’m not going to declare all out war on carbohydrates, or tell you can or can’t drink your calories in the form of olive oil, or feast and fast with cayenne peppers and maple syrup. No, the real distilled learning from my years of consulting and data analysis shows that a balanced, low-insulin diet with nutrient timing and activity is the best way to lose weight with Type 1 diabetes. It also helps you maintain brain and body function as well as energy levels. If you are reading this you’ve probably already given this some thought and know why it’s important to lose weight and/or lean out, but I maintain it’s all about performance! Performing means living a longer or healthier life or if you’re an athlete, it can also translate to beating out your competition. Things that Impact w Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

All The 2 Percent Want To Do Is Gain Weight

All The 2 Percent Want To Do Is Gain Weight

Like many 23-year-olds, Amanda Eang is self-conscious about her body. She constantly covers up and wears loose-fitting clothing to disguise her shape. At five-foot-two, she weighs just 93 pounds, and for years she has tried to gain weight. "There are a lot of shows about losing weight, but they really don't have anything for people who are underweight," she says. "It's just as frustrating for people who are trying to gain weight." Eang, who lives in Toronto, says she has tried everything: eating junk food (which left her with high cholesterol), drinking supplements and doing resistance training. She'd like to reach 110 pounds, but she has never even weighed 100 pounds. Fewer than 2% of adults in the United States are underweight, according to 2007 to 2010 data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. To be considered underweight, individuals must have a body mass index of less than 18.5. A woman who is five-foot-six, for example, would weigh 114 pounds or less. For some, difficulty gaining weight can be a frustrating problem and must be approached in a healthy way, experts say. Ruling out problems Before attempting to put on pounds, individuals who feel they are underweight should visit their primary care doctor for a complete physical examination, says Craig Primack, a medical obesity specialist and member of the American Society of Bariatric Physicians. A physician can rule out medical issues that would impede weight gain or cause malabsorption, including celiac disease, lactose intolerance, bacterial overgrowth syndrome or B12 deficiency. Genetics play a big role in why some people are underweight, Primack says. A high metabolic rate is usually a factor, he says The rest is a mystery. Experts have done significantly less research about being underweigh Continue reading >>

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