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Skinny Diabetic Needs To Gain Weight

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes?

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes?

This article is suitable for anyone interested in improving the look of their body right through to the professional bodybuilder, and athlete looking to improve performance. How do you build muscle? Lift weights? Consume enough protein? Get enough rest? {Repeat} ^ Yes, Pretty much! Everyone has the potential to build muscle over the course of their lifetime. Some people are happy with the level of muscle mass they have while others desire more for performance and aesthetic related reasons. The ability to gain muscle is highly specific to an individual’s genetics, baseline hormone levels and day to day activity. Many of these factors change as we age, reducing our capacity to gain muscle as we age. In other words, Muscle mass increases as we age up until a certain point. The effect of age on work capacity and muscle growth is a complex and lengthy subject. In fact, there is an hour long video module on the topic on the member’s site (coming soon). Anyhow, The best way to stimulate muscle growth is regular weights resistance training or loaded body movement. Even though we perform loaded movements daily, such as Squatting down to pick up our pets, Carrying the groceries to the car, Pushing annoying people ‘out the way.’ Pulling the kids around, Picking things up (hip-hinge) of the ground Day to Day Movement Isn’t Enough. None of these movements load our muscles heavily or frequently enough to stimulate gains in muscle mass. Weights resistance training is an incredibly useful tool for increasing muscle mass, especially with diabetes. The intensity (load) and frequency of training determine the stress placed on the body’s musculature and consequently determine how fast muscle tissue is gained. Training means nothing without recovery. For the body to get the best Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight On Low Carb Or Keto

How To Gain Weight On Low Carb Or Keto

Do you want to gain weight? Given how most nutrition articles focus on fat loss, maybe you feel in a minority there. The usual advice for weight gain is to eat a higher amount of carbohydrates to “bulk up” and adopt an exercise program. Unfortunately it often results in mainly gaining fat mass, and is not necessarily healthy. This page will examine how to gain weight the healthy way, while staying on a low-carb diet, and has the following subsections: Low-carb for weight gain? While most people see a low-carb diet as a weight-loss diet, this is not necessarily true. Low carb tends to lead to weight loss for people with excess weight, due to increased satiety and fat burning. However, low-carb foods are very nutrient dense, and can assist lean weight gain in people who are underweight. Eating low carb, and eating when hungry, can be considered a weight-normalizing diet (or lifestyle). 1. Why do people want to gain weight? It’s true that most people today are looking to lose weight, but some also want to gain weight. While the majority just want to add a few extra pounds to a skinny frame, others wish to build muscle and increase in size. So, what are the reasons people want to gain weight? That depends on the goal, but here are several: Gain more strength Sporting objectives For better metabolic health (muscles burn more fat) Combat aging (muscle-density loss is a natural side effect) Improve self-confidence To possibly improve overall health (in those who are too skinny) All of these are understandable aims where weight gain could possibly benefit someone’s life. Problems caused by pressure to gain weight Unfortunately, this desire for weight gain often causes problems. This is especially the case in young men, with more than 8.5% of people extremely concerned a Continue reading >>

11 Ways To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

11 Ways To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

Although diabetes is often associated with being overweight, especially type 2 diabetes, it’s a myth that everyone with diabetes has a high body mass index (BMI). Some people have trouble gaining weight. In fact, unexplained or unintentional weight loss can be a symptom of undiagnosed diabetes. Issues with weight management center around insulin, a hormone produced by your pancreas. People with diabetes are unable to use or produce enough insulin to transport excess sugar out of their blood and into their cells, where it can be used as energy. This can cause your body to burn its existing fat stores and muscle tissue in order to supply your cells with energy. If your sugar levels are constantly in flux, your body will continue to chip away at its fat stores, resulting in weight loss. Diabetes food plans are often geared toward helping people lose, rather than gain, weight. This can make it harder to figure out how to gain weight in a healthy way. Before trying the tips below, talk with your doctor or dietician. They can help you set the right diet and exercise goals for you, as well as answer any questions you may have. There are many apps available to help you manage your condition and make the right food choices. Look for apps that help you track blood sugar and BMI. Some options include: GlucOracle: This glucose forecasting app uses crowdsourcing to analyze the estimated amount of carbohydrates, protein, fat, calories, and fiber in each meal. It also predicts what your glucose level will be after eating. SuperTracker: This app helps you gain weight by providing comprehensive nutritional information on over 8,000 food items. It also tracks your nutritional targets, diet, and activity levels against your goals. If these don’t appeal to you, we’ve also rounded up Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight With Type 2 Diabetes

How To Gain Weight With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a complicated and dangerous disease in which blood sugar levels are often too high, which can cause dizziness, increased thirst and heart problems. Diabetics need to make sure to control their weights and be neither too heavy nor too thin. If you have diabetes and need to gain weight, be aware that gaining too much weight, fat especially, can worsen the symptoms of diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic. Instead, you need to eat the right foods, exercise and take good care of yourself to safely gain weight. Video of the Day Increase the calories in your diet while watching your carbohydrate intake. Gaining weight is simply a matter of eating more calories than you burn, but having diabetes complicates the equation because it’s not safe for diabetics to eat whatever foods they want. The Mayo Clinic recommends limiting sweets like candy and chocolate, as they can spike your blood sugar levels too quickly, and instead of eating foods with refined carbohydrates like white rice, white bread and pasta, eat more whole grains like whole wheat bread, proteins like chicken and fats like olive oil. Continue to check your blood sugar levels as often as your doctor or dietitian recommends. Eat more plant sources of fat while continuing to limit animal sources of fat. Since type 2 diabetics are at a higher risk of heart disease, the Mayo Clinic recommends that they limit their intake of fat from animals, such as beef, bacon, whole milk and butter. Instead, olive oil, nuts and avocados are all high in calories, but contain healthy unsaturated fats. Start lifting weights or using resistance bands to strength-train at home. You can try bicep curls, push-ups, squats with weights in your hand, and any other strength-training exercise. If you are going to gain weight, make su Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight When You Live With Diabetes

How To Lose Weight When You Live With Diabetes

Losing weight can be difficult for anyone, and living with diabetes definitely doesn’t make it easier. However, there ARE people who set out to lose weight and end up so extraordinarily successful that you wonder if they have some inside information you don’t. That information EXISTS. I’m here to give you the rundown on how to successfully lose weight when you live with diabetes. In this post, I will go through: How to set realistic goals How many calories to eat How much protein, carbs, and fat to eat How much to exercise How blood glucose control affects your weight Without further ado…lets GET TO IT! Temper expectations at the start People these days have this intensive need for instant gratification. They want that 15 lbs gone by yesterday! While I’m all for efficiency, I’m going to be short and sweet and show reality with a pop quiz: True or false: it took more than a week to gain the weight you are trying to lose. The answer is undeniably “True”. So if it took you X number of months to gain weight, why would it take you a week or two to lose it? It doesn’t. It takes time and some concerted effort. Don’t expect to lose all of the weight immediately, but know that with proper habit formation and consistency, you WILL see the results you are after. The general rule for healthy weight loss is to aim for A MAX of 1-2 lbs. per week. It’s also quite common for people living with diabetes to take as long as 2-3 weeks before seeing any weight loss at all on a new diet. “Why?” you ask. Changing caloric intake and workout routines may require a reduction of insulin (or other diabetes medication) as well as diet manipulation, which takes a little trial and error to adjust. BE PATIENT. Once the ball is rolling, a slow and controlled weight loss makes Continue reading >>

Keeping The Pounds On: Strategies For Gaining Weight

Keeping The Pounds On: Strategies For Gaining Weight

If one of your goals is to gain weight, it helps to have a game plan in mind. Just as there are smart, sensible ways to lose weight, there are strategies for gaining weight in a healthful way. Loading up on sugary, fatty foods may certainly put the pounds on, but common sense tells us that scarfing down bowls of ice cream every day won’t win you the dietitian seal of approval. The key, as always, is to focus on nutrient-rich (and in this case, higher-calorie) foods, whether you’re trying to gain, lose, or maintain your weight. The other consideration, of course, is your diabetes. You need to consider the effect of increased food intake on your blood glucose control. Calories count While it’s usually not necessary to count calories, it does help to have an understanding of A) how many calories you need (approximately) to gain (or lose) weight and B) how many calories are in the foods you eat. While somewhat simplistic and not entirely accurate, one guideline you can keep in mind is that it takes approximately 3500 calories to gain one pound. It follows, then, that to put on one pound in a week, you must increase your daily food intake by 500 calories. There are a number of online calorie calculators that can give you a sense of how many calories you need, based on factors such as your age, gender, height, weight, and activity level. A few to check out are the Mayo Clinic calculator, the My-calorie-counter.com calculator, and the FreeDieting.com calculator. Once you have a sense of where you stand with your calorie needs, you can find nutrition information from any number of Web sites, including CalorieKing and SelfNutritionData, for example. You can also purchase a food counts book and, of course, don’t forget to read food labels for calories, carb grams, and fat Continue reading >>

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

I recently was included in a discussion on a Facebook group for athletes with diabetes about how hard it can be to lose weight through exercise. While I would never claim to have all the answers on this topic, here are some ideas about what can make you gain weight or keep you from losing weight with diabetes, based on my decades of professional and personal experience with diabetes and weight management, and what you can do about it. Insulin My former graduate student with type 1 diabetes went on an insulin pump and promptly gained about 10 pounds, even though his blood glucose control improved only marginally. Why did this happen to him (and why does it happen to so many other insulin users)? As a naturally occurring anabolic hormone, insulin promotes the uptake and storage of glucose, amino acids, and fat into insulin-sensitive cells around your body (mainly muscle and fat cells). It doesn’t matter whether it’s released naturally, injected, or pumped—all insulin and insulin analogues have these same effects. Going on intensive insulin therapy is associated with fat weight gain (1), for people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Some of the weight gain comes from that if you’re using insulin to keep your blood glucose in control, you’ll be keeping and storing all of the calories that you’re eating instead of losing some glucose through urine (during hyperglycemia). Unfortunately, this realization has led some people to try skipping or limiting their insulin use to help them lose weight (2), but that is a dangerous practice that can lead to loss of excess muscle mass and life-threatening conditions like DKA. The best way to balance your insulin use and your body weight, in my opinion, is to be physically active to keep your overall insulin levels lower. I Continue reading >>

Q & A: Best Diet For Dogs With Diabetes Mellitus

Q & A: Best Diet For Dogs With Diabetes Mellitus

I have a 10-year old, male, 4-kg Miniature Pinscher that has been on twice daily NPH insulin injections (0.75 U/kg per injection) for the last 6 months. Because of his diabetes, we have been feeding Hill's Prescription w/d diet. Overall, the serum glucose curves are quite good, the polyuria and polydipsia have resolved, and the dog seems to feels great. However, despite being well controlled, the dog has been losing weight and has lost over 1.5 kg since diagnosis. The main problem is that the dog continues to be ravenous and is loosing weight. Despite being well controlled on his blood glucose curved, the dog has lost over 1.5 kg since diagnosis. Am I feeding the wrong diet? I thought that all diabetic dogs did best when fed a high fiber diet such as Hill's w/d. My Response: First of all, there is not one type of diet that is recommended for all dogs with diabetes. Diabetic dogs can do well when fed a number of diets as long as they are nutritionally complete and balanced, do not contain simple sugars, are fed at consistent times in consistent amounts, and are palatable to ensure a predictable and consistent appetite. As we all know, it's difficult enough to regulate a diabetic when they are eating consistently well— if they refuse to eat their diet, adequate glucose regulation can become next to impossible. In many newly diagnosed diabetic dogs, I don't change their diet at all. The most important dietary factor in the diabetic is consistency, so that you can match your insulin dose to the degree of post-prandial hyperglycemia. The owner must understand that the key is to feed the same amount of the same diet at the same time every day! In general, the goals of dietary therapy in canine diabetes mellitus are four-fold: Optimize the dog's body weight and body conditio Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight And Maintain Blood Glucose

How To Gain Weight And Maintain Blood Glucose

By Lara Rondinelli-Hamilton, RD, LDN, CDE Yes, you read the title correctly—there are people with diabetes that are actually trying to gain weight. These people are underweight and need to put on a few pounds without creating extremely high blood sugar levels. Note: If you have diabetes and are losing weight or having difficulty gaining weight, your first step is making sure the issue isn’t due to high blood glucose levels. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia, which is typical with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes (or misdiagnosed type 2), can lead to weight loss and is a dangerous state for your body. If your weight loss or inability to gain weight is unexpected, make sure to discuss it right away with your doctor. It may be that your medication needs to be adjusted for better glycemic control. If, on the other hand, your blood glucose levels are controlled, here are few tips to help you gain weight without spiking your sugar. 1. Eat three meals a day. Don’t skip meals. If you are trying to gain weight, you need to increase your daily caloric intake. If you skip breakfast (or any meal), you could be missing out on an extra 400 to 500 calories per day, which if done consistently could lead to a one-pound weight loss per week. So, even if you are not a breakfast person, find some foods that you can eat for breakfast, such as a fruit-vegetable smoothie (you can add flax seed and coconut oil to increase calories, fiber, and satiety). A quick smoothie could be a few handfuls of spinach, 1 cup frozen berries, ½ banana, 1-2 tablespoons coconut oil, 1 tablespoon ground flax seed and ½-1 cup coconut milk. Serve the smoothie with a side of egg and chicken sausage. You might also try an egg, cheese, and avocado sandwich on a low-carb wrap or tortilla. 2. Eat snacks. Snacks and small me Continue reading >>

Tips To Gain Weight

Tips To Gain Weight

Save for later If you have diabetes and you’re underweight or struggling with your appetite, it’s important to eat the foods you like rather than being too restrictive with your diet. This may mean eating foods that are higher in fat and calories. Speak with your diabetes team to review your medications and talk to a dietitian to help you make any changes. Do you want to put on weight? These are some of the things your dietitian may suggest to help you gain/maintain your weight. Eat smaller meals, more often. You’ll find this easier than eating three large meals and it will also help increase your appetite. Use full-fat dairy products like milk, cream, cheese and yogurt. Add unsaturated fats to your food where you can in foods such as avocados, nuts and seeds, and spreads and oils, including olive, rapeseed, sunflower and peanut. Unsaturated fats are still high in calories, but better for your heart than saturated fats. Serve vegetables with melted butter, spread or grated cheese. Add cream or full-fat milk to foods like mashed potato or soups. Have nourishing drinks like smoothies and milky drinks. Add powdered milk to cereals. Nutritional supplements, in the form of food or drink, can be useful for some people who are finding it hard to gain weight or who have a poor appetite. They are available on prescription. Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight Fast And Naturally (the Ultimate Guide)

How To Gain Weight Fast And Naturally (the Ultimate Guide)

Most of the people these days struggle with weight issues. A big number of people are either obese or overweight. Yet, not so small number of people have the opposite problem – the problem of being too skinny or underweight. For overweight people, this issue might not seem like a real one, but for people struggling with this condition, it is a very vivid problem. It often depends on the person’s metabolism, body structure, and genetics. Sometimes little tips and tricks can help you gain weight. But whether you are clinically underweight or you are just a “hard gainer”, principles of obtaining more kilograms are basically the same. What Does it Mean to be Underweight It means that your body doesn’t inquire the minimum amount of body mass needed to obtain optimal health. Even though obesity is number one health problem in the world today, being underweight can also be bad for your body. One study showed that there is a big chance of an early death because of this condition. Being underweight is also bad for your immune system. Your body does not receive the needed amount of vitamins, minerals, and other healthy substances. They are required for performing regular bodily functions. You are more vulnerable to immune diseases, for example, viruses, osteoporosis, and infections if you lack a sustainable amount of kilograms. There are several reasons why somebody has lost weight or struggles with gaining weight. Most common conditions are eating disorders. One of the most serious eating disorders is anorexia nervosa, a serious mental disorder. Other reasons may include different medical conditions, such as diabetes, thyroid problems, infections or even cancer. If you are experiencing some symptoms that pinpoint to some of these diseases, contact your doctor immediate Continue reading >>

> Weight And Diabetes

> Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it to the muscles. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of it through urine. This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 diabetes have a condition called ins Continue reading >>

Low Carb Weight Gain Diet For Diabetes

Low Carb Weight Gain Diet For Diabetes

Marie says: “I love all your information and it is so helpful ……but I need to gain weight without carbs and I am having a hard time.” While weight loss is an aim that is most common for people with type 2 diabetes, some people, like Marie, want to achieve weight gain or maintain their current weight without losing anymore. And as Marie clearly pointed out, this can be a bit tough when you choose to follow a lower carb diet. You see, those high carb foods that send your blood sugar soaring – sugar, rice, potatoes, pasta and bread – also happen to be loaded with calories. So when they get the cut, your blood sugar levels go down, which is great. But, suddenly you're stuck with eating non starchy vegetables (which is awesome) but you'll be dropping lots of calories and weight, too. If weight loss is your goal, all very well. If not, you can find you're dropping too much weight too quick and being too thin can also be problematic for your health. So, as promised, we're here to discuss what type of foods to eat so you can maintain or gain the weight you want while still following a low carb diet. Step 1: Increase calories We're all aware of the fact that the amount of food we eat makes a difference. Even when we eat lots of healthy foods, we can still eat too much – leading to weight gain. So it makes sense that what you need to do to gain weight is increase your caloric intake. But, you want to be focusing on doing that by eating nutrient dense real foods, not junk foods. Clearly, this defeats the purpose. Step 2: More fat equals more calories Both carbohydrates and protein contain 4 calories per gram while fat contains 9 calories per gram. Therefore, it makes sense that the easiest way to increase calories is to increase your intake of healthy fats. Healthy f Continue reading >>

How Do I Help My Skinny Dog Gain Weight?

How Do I Help My Skinny Dog Gain Weight?

If your dog receives an adequate, nutritious diet but remains thin, you might have to go through some trial-and-error feeding to help the skinny dog gain weight. Make sure you're feeding a high-quality dog food that contains all the nutrients your dog needs for his lifestyle. Also consider your dog's breeding and lifestyle: An active dog needs more calories than a couch potato. If your dog receives ample amounts of food but isn't gaining weight, take him to the vet for a thorough checkup to make sure no underlying illness or condition is causing lack of weight gain. Common causes of canine weight loss include intestinal parasites, dental issues, infections and inflammation. Your vet will conduct tests to ensure your dog isn't suffering from diabetes, hyperthyroidism, cancer, inflammatory bowel disease or other serious illnesses that could cause weight loss. If your dog is otherwise healthy, a change of diet or additions to his current food can help him gain weight. Does your dog scarf down his meals, or does he eat slowly or even leave food behind? It's possible that he doesn't care for his food, even if it's an expensive, well-balanced, commercial diet. Consider changing brands or flavors and see if he happily cleans his plate. If you primarily feed kibble, consider adding canned food to the diet. Make dietary changes over the course of several days to avoid gastrointestinal upsets. Go ahead and involve your vet in your dietary planning; you'll want the vet involved throughout. If your dog is a picky eater, try warming his food in the microwave before serving. You just need to warm it in there for a short time, perhaps 20 seconds. Touch the food before giving it to your dog to ensure it's not too hot. You might also want to add warm chicken or beef broth to make his me Continue reading >>

Think Skinny People Don’t Get Type 2 Diabetes? Think Again.

Think Skinny People Don’t Get Type 2 Diabetes? Think Again.

In the last article we discussed the complex relationship between body weight and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We learned that although obesity is strongly associated with T2DM, a subset of “metabolically healthy obese” (MHO) people have normal blood sugar and insulin sensitivity and don’t ever develop diabetes. In this article we’re going to talk about the mirror reflection of the MHO: the “metabolically unhealthy nonobese” (MUN). These are lean people with either full-fledged type 2 diabetes or some metabolic dysfunction, such as insulin resistance. You might even be surprised to learn that skinny people can and do get T2DM. They are rarely mentioned in the media, and there isn’t much written about them in the scientific literature. Perhaps these folks have been overlooked because type 2 diabetes has been historically viewed as a disease of gluttony and sloth, a self-inflicted outcome of eating too much and not and not exercising enough. But the very existence of the MUN phenotype proves that there’s more to T2DM than overeating and a sedentary lifestyle. Remember that one in three type 2 diabetics are undiagnosed. It’s possible that a significant number of these people that are lean. They don’t suspect they might have T2DM because they’re under the impression that it’s not a condition that affects thin people. This is one of the biggest dangers of the myth that “only fat people get diabetes”. It’s well-known that high blood sugar can precede the development of T2DM for as long as ten years. It is during this time that many of the complications associated with diabetes – nerve damage, retinal changes, and early signs of kidney deterioration – begin to develop. This is why it’s just as important for lean people to maintain healthy blood s Continue reading >>

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