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Similarities Between Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Insipidus Vs. Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Insipidus Vs. Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is characterized by high levels of sugar in the blood while diabetes insipidus is a disease where kidneys are unable to conserve water. Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare disease while diabetes mellitus is very common; "diabetes" in general usage refers to diabetes mellitus, which is of 3 types — gestational, Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. The causes, symptoms, treatment and prognosis for diabetes insipidus are different from diabetes mellitus. Comparison chart Excessive thirst, excess volume of severely diluted urine. High blood sugar, excessive urination, increased thirst, increased hunger. 3 in 100,000 people 7.7 per 1000 people Deficiency of ADH. Brain tumor, head injury, medication such as lithium, genetics Type 1 - Autoimmune Disease; Type 2 - Genetics, lifestyle, infection Typically desmopressin (nasal spray) or IM, IV hypertonic saline solution (3% or 5%). Thiazide diuretics. Insulin and lifestyle management Causes and Types of Diabetes Diabetes insipidus Diabetes insipidus, or DI, is characterized by the inability of kidneys to conserve water when they purify blood. This can be either because of: a deficiency of ADH (antidiuretic hormone or vasopressin), or a failure of the kidneys to respond to ADH In the first case, the condition is called central DI, and in the second case it is called nephrogenic DI. Central DI is the more common form of the disease. Central DI can be inherited or caused due to damage to either the hypothalamus (the part of the brain that produces ADH) or the pituitary gland, where ADH is stored. Head injuries, tumors, infections or surgery can inflict such damage. Nephrogenic DI can be inherited (from mother to son) or be caused by kidney disease, hypercalcemia (excess calcium in the body) or by certain drugs such as lithiu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Vs. Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Mellitus Vs. Diabetes Insipidus

Many people assume that since both diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus begin with the word diabetes, they must be related. They also share two common warning signs: increased thirst and excessive urination. But the truth is that these conditions are not related at all. The latin word for diabetes means "to siphon." You could say that both conditions are due to some sort of siphoning or filtering problem—one is related to sugar and the other is related to fluid. That is where the similarities end. Below is a breakdown of what you need to know about diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus. Diabetes Mellitus In diabetes mellitus, your body is unable to regulate your blood’s glucose levels. When your body breaks down food into its most simple form, it is called glucose, which is a simple sugar that is carried in the blood to other cells in your body. Glucose is energy that your body needs for daily life. To supply your body with energy, glucose must be transferred out of the blood and into your other cells. A chemical called insulin is needed for this transfer. If there is a shortage of insulin to facilitate the process, then you will have a higher glucose level in your blood. Diabetes mellitus can be summed up in this way: not enough insulin and too much glucose. Types of Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed at a young age. It is the most common form of diabetes in persons younger than 20 years old. In this form of diabetes mellitus, the pancreas, the organ responsible for producing insulin, does not function properly. This causes hyperglycemia because of a shortage in insulin production. Therefore, type 1 diabetics must rely on insulin injections to survive. Type 2 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed in overweight, middle-aged adults. In Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus | Major Differences

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus | Major Differences

Difference between Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus Diabetes Mellitus It ischaracterizedby hyperglycemia (high blood sugar level), glycosuria (glucose in urine), polyuria ( increased volume of urine due to the osmotic effect of glucose), polydipsia (excessivie thirst), polyphagia (excessive appetite). It is due to the hyposecretion of insulin or lack of insulin. It is of two types:- Diabetes Type I and Diabetes Type II. Diabetes Type I (Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, IDDM): It is cased due to deficient insulin production by pancreas because either beta cells of islets of Langerhans are not able to produce insulin or beta cells are absent. Diabetes Type II (Insulin Independent or Non insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, NIDDM): It is an inherited recessive autosomal disorder appearing after the age of 40 years in which the cells fail to take up insulin from blood. It results in deficient passage of glucose form blood into the cell surfaces for storage or for direct consumption. It may occur due to defective insulin receptors over cell surfaces or abnormality on plasma protein amylin. The phenomenon is called insulin resistance. This type of diabetes mellitus accounts for 80-90% of all cases of diabetes. It is kept under control by administration of insulin in case of insulin dependent diabetes. and hypoglycaemics in case of insulin independent diabetes. Sugar free diet is a pre requisite in both the cases. Diabetes Insipidus (Drinkers disease): Hypo secretion of ADH (Antidiuretic hormone or Vasopressin) causes a disorder known as diabetes insipidus (Excretion of large quantity of dilute urine). ADH is released into blood when special osmoreceptors or hypothalamic neurons are stimulated by rise in osmotic pressure of blood due to loss of water from the body Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Main Difference Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which the body is unable to produce enough insulin to maintain the blood glucose level resulting in high glucose level in blood. Diabetes is a general term for diabetes mellitus. Diabetes insipidus is a disease characterized by excessive thirst with excretion of large amount of diluted urine. Diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus are two totally different medical conditions. In diabetes mellitus polyuria is because of osmotic diuresis while in diabetes insipidus polyuria is because of diminished production of ADH (antidiuretic hormone) or kidney’s response to ADH. Diabetes mellitus commonly referred as diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which the blood glucose level is prolonged for a long time. Diabetes is due to cells of pancreas do not produce enough insulin or the cells of the body do not response adequately to the insulin produced. Diabetes mellitus is classified into type I DM and type II DM. Type I DM also known as insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile diabetes. In type I DM cells of pancreas fails to produce enough insulin to maintain the blood glucose level. The etiology of type I DM is unknown. Type II DM also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult onset diabetes. In type II DM body’s cells fails to respond to insulin produced by pancreas. Type II DM primary cause is excessive weight gain and not enough activity. There is also another type of diabetes that occur during pregnancy known as gestational diabetes. Symptoms of untreated diabetes mellitus are polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia and weight loss. Symptoms can be developed within one month of type I DM while in type II DM the symptoms develop much more slowly. Type I DM can be treated on Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

On this page: What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder that occurs when a person's kidneys pass an abnormally large volume of urine that is insipid—dilute and odorless. In most people, the kidneys pass about 1 to 2 quarts of urine a day. In people with diabetes insipidus, the kidneys can pass 3 to 20 quarts of urine a day. As a result, a person with diabetes insipidus may feel the need to drink large amounts of liquids. Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus—which includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes—are unrelated, although both conditions cause frequent urination and constant thirst. Diabetes mellitus causes high blood glucose, or blood sugar, resulting from the body's inability to use blood glucose for energy. People with diabetes insipidus have normal blood glucose levels; however, their kidneys cannot balance fluid in the body. What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of a fist. They are located just below the rib cage, one on each side of the spine. Every day, the kidneys normally filter about 120 to 150 quarts of blood to produce about 1 to 2 quarts of urine, composed of wastes and extra fluid. The urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder through tubes called ureters. The bladder stores urine. When the bladder empties, urine flows out of the body through a tube called the urethra, located at the bottom of the bladder. How is fluid regulated in the body? A person's body regulates fluid by balancing liquid intake and removing extra fluid. Thirst usually controls a person’s rate of liquid intake, while urination removes most fluid, although people also lose fluid through sweating, breathing, or diarrhea. The hormone vasopressin, also called antidiuretic hormone, con Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Mellitus vs Diabetes Insipidus Diabetes mellitus, which is commonly known as diabetes, is a condition in which the person suffering from it has high blood sugar. This may be because the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells do not respond to it. There are three different types of diabetes which are: Type 1, Type 2, and gestational diabetes. In Type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin, and the person needs insulin injections. In Type 2 diabetes, the body does not respond to insulin and may also not produce enough of it. Gestational diabetes occurs only in pregnant women whereby a woman who never had diabetes before has a high blood glucose level during pregnancy. On the other hand, diabetes insipidus is a condition which is rare and causes frequent urination and excessive thirst. Like diabetes mellitus, it has different types and each has a different cause. The type which is more common is called central diabetes insipidus which is caused by a deficiency of the anti-diuretic hormone. This is due to damage of the pituitary gland and is treated by desmopressin which prevents water excretion. The second commonest type is nephrogenic diabetes insipidus which is caused by the kidneys being insensitive to the anti-diuretic hormone due to drugs or kidney disease. Diabetes mellitus is more common than diabetes insipidus. Both involve frequent urination and excessive thirst. Diabetes mellitus also results in vision changes due to prolonged high blood glucose which causes glucose absorption. People with this condition may also present with a sweet-smelling breath, vomiting, nausea, and abdominal pain. Diabetes insipidus is diagnosed by blood tests, urine tests, and a water deprivation test. Summary: 1.Diabetes mellitus is a condition in which Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus?

What Is The Difference Between Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus?

The two types of diabetes, diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus differ in many ways. Though they share common name, ‘diabetes’, the reasons behind them and most of the symptoms are different. Diabetes mellitus is the most common of the two, as it is a lifestyle disease that affects metabolism in our body. The increased incidence of sedentary life, tensions, and decrease in physical activity are mostly to be blamed, though some other reasons such as auto-immune disease also are causes. Some severe head injuries, tumours, or certain diseases can result in diabetes insipidus. Here is more about diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus and the differences between them. What is diabetes insipidus? Due to some injuries or viral diseases, the hypothalamus or pituitary gland get damaged and might be rendered unable to produce the hormone vasopressin. In some, the kidneys might have defect or be damaged due to certain reasons resulting in inability to respond to vasopressin. This lack of vasopressin or inability to respond to vasopressin causes the body to lose water through excessive urination. This is known as diabetes insipidus. What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus varies from diabetes insipidus mainly in the hormone involved. When it comes to diabetes mellitus, the hormone involved is insulin, secreted by pancreas, which is absorbed by the cells in our body as a message to use glucose present in the blood. When pancreas is unable to secrete insulin or when the cells in our body develop resistance to insulin, the glucose in the blood will not be utilized. This is known as diabetes mellitus. What are the differences between Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mellitus? The Hormones Involved In diabetes insipidus, it is the lack of vasopressin or inability of kidney Continue reading >>

In What Ways Do Diabetes Insipidus & Diabetes Mellitus Differ?

In What Ways Do Diabetes Insipidus & Diabetes Mellitus Differ?

Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus are very different conditions. The commonality between the two, besides the word "diabetes," is that both involve thirst and urination. Beyond this point the conditions differ significantly. The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse defines three main types of diabetes mellitus and various other forms, all acting upon insulin levels that regulate blood sugar. Diabetes insipidus has four types and none of the forms relate to insulin production or regulation. Furthermore, the causes of the conditions, the hormones affected and condition management all differ between diabetes insipidus and mellitus. Video of the Day Diabetes insipidus is uncommon compared to diabetes mellitus in the general population. The cause of diabetes insipidus stems from an antidiuretic hormone, which is produced in the hypothalamus and stored in the pituitary gland at the base of the brain. MayoClinic.com indicates that the process of fluid excretion signaled by the hormone to the kidneys is disrupted either due to a defect in the kidney tubules or because of damage to the brain impacting the release of the antidiuretic hormone. The cause of diabetes mellitus is an insufficiency in a different hormone that is produced in the pancreas--either in the production of the hormone, or in the body's ability to respond to it. Diabetes mellitus is also referred to as sugar diabetes because the disease centers around the body's inability to properly process glucose, a form of sugar that is the body's primary energy source. Vasopressin is a hormone created and secreted by the brain for controlling water metabolism. According to the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse, when this hormone is secreted to the kidneys it directs the kidneys t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

What are the types of diabetes insipidus? Central Diabetes Insipidus The most common form of serious diabetes insipidus, central diabetes insipidus, results from damage to the pituitary gland, which disrupts the normal storage and release of ADH. Damage to the pituitary gland can be caused by different diseases as well as by head injuries, neurosurgery, or genetic disorders. To treat the ADH deficiency that results from any kind of damage to the hypothalamus or pituitary, a synthetic hormone called desmopressin can be taken by an injection, a nasal spray, or a pill. While taking desmopressin, a person should drink fluids only when thirsty and not at other times. The drug prevents water excretion, and water can build up now that the kidneys are making less urine and are less responsive to changes in body fluids. Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus results when the kidneys are unable to respond to ADH. The kidneys' ability to respond to ADH can be impaired by drugs-like lithium, for example-and by chronic disorders including polycystic kidney disease, sickle cell disease, kidney failure, partial blockage of the ureters, and inherited genetic disorders. Sometimes the cause of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is never discovered. Desmopressin will not work for this form of diabetes insipidus. Instead, a person with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus may be given hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) or indomethacin. HCTZ is sometimes combined with another drug called amiloride. The combination of HCTZ and amiloride is sold under the brand name Moduretic. Again, with this combination of drugs, one should drink fluids only when thirsty and not at other times. Dipsogenic Diabetes insipidus Dipsogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by a defect in or damage to the thirst Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Tweet Diabetes insipidus, often shortened to DI, is a rare form of diabetes that is not related to blood sugar-related diabetes mellitus, but does share some of its signs and symptoms. Diabetes insipidus is simply excessive urination (polyuria) and complications thereof, caused by an antidiuretice hormone called a vasopressin. Read on to find out more about what diabetes insipidus is, how it affects the body, the different forms of the disease, and how it is diagnosed and treated. What are the symptoms of diabetes insipidus? Diabetes Insipidus leads to frequent urination, and this is the most common and clear symptom. In extreme cases, urination can be in excess of 20 litres per day. A secondary symptom is increased thirst, as a result of passing so much water. If this is not met, then dehydration can occur which, in turn, can lead to: Cracked skin Confusion Dizziness and even Unconsciousness Children suffering from the condition may become irritable or listless, with fever and vomiting also possible. How does diabetes insipidus compare with diabetes mellitus? Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus should not be confused. The two conditions are unrelated, with diabetes insipidus a completely different type of illness. Diabetes mellitus is also far more common. Diabetes mellitus occurs due to insulin resistance or insulin deficiency and subsequent high blood glucose levels. Diabetes Insipidus on the other hand develops as a result of the stilted production of a hormone in the brain, which is released to stop the kidneys producing so much urine in order to retain water. Without this hormone, water is not retained and the kidneys constantly work to their maximum capacity. The word "Mellitus" tagged onto the main form of diabetes comes from an old word roughly meaning "to Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Vs. Diabetes Insipidus: What's The Difference?

Diabetes Mellitus Vs. Diabetes Insipidus: What's The Difference?

The word diabetes is related to excess urination or polyuria. In physiology, we study two types of diabetes. One is diabetes mellitus, and other is diabetes insipidus. Both of the diseases are way different from each other due their cause and origin etc., but they have one thing in common: excess urination. Diabetes mellitus is a most common type of diabetes; it is characterized by excess glucose level in the blood that is followed by excess urination. And, diabetes insipidus is the disorder characterized by the excess urination due to function instability of ADH or lack of ADH, in this excess water is lost from the body which results in many serious conditions like dehydration, etc. The main difference in between diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus is the hormone. In diabetes mellitus Insulin is involved, whereas in diabetes insipidus ADH is involved. AdHealthPlus50 Visit Site Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes Insipidus Glucose Level In diabetes mellitus, blood glucose level is high. In diabetes insipidus, the glucose level is normal, but excess water is lost. Hormone Diabetes mellitus is related to a hormone called insulin. Diabetes insipidus is related to hormone ADH. Gland In diabetes mellitus, a gland that is involved is the pancreas. In diabetes insipidus, pituitary gland is involved. Types of Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is more common in types of diabetes. Diabetes insipidus is less seen. Symptoms In diabetes mellitus, patient feel hungry due to loss of glucose in urine. In diabetes insipidus, the patient feels thirsty due to loss of excess water. Diabetes means excess urination and Mellitus means honey. Diabetes mellitus is the most common disorder seen around. This disorder is characterized by excess glucose in the blood which leads to polyurea. Normal blood gluco Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus Vs Mellitus

Diabetes Insipidus Vs Mellitus

Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus might share a name and have some similar symptoms, but they are two very different diseases. They also require two very different treatments. Because diabetes mellitus involves blood sugar levels and insulin resistance, it is important for most people to use a blood sugar monitoring device daily and eat low glycemic foods that won’t spike their blood sugar levels. For diabetes insipidus, it isn’t blood sugar that is the problem, but blood water levels. The body produces a hormone called Vasopressin that is supposed to control how much water the kidneys take out of the blood stream. Converted to urine, these fluids flush out the wastes that the kidneys filter out. When this system malfunctions, a person’s thirst increases because the body thinks it needs more water to flush out impurities. By paying attention to the specific signs and symptoms of each disease, it becomes possible to discover which is the problem and find an appropriate solution to the issue. Here are the common symptoms and what they mean for each. Excessive Fatigue For diabetes insipidus, excessive fatigue occurs because of an overall lack of hydration. It may also be caused by an electrolyte imbalance. For diabetes mellitus, excessive fatigue generally occurs because blood sugar levels are too low or too high. Excessive Thirst This symptom occurs in diabetes insipidus because the body senses a lack of Vasopressin and so it demands more fluids because it thinks it needs them. For diabetes mellitus, the excessive thirst occurs because of excessive glucose levels that need to be expelled from the body. Urine for those with diabetes insipidus is clear and transparent, while with diabetes mellitus, it is yellow, pale, and often cloudy. Blurred Vision With diabe Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

ADVERTISEMENTS: The upcoming discussion will update you about the differences between Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus of Humans. Difference # Diabetes Mellitus: 1. It is due to deficiency of insulin. 2. It is, thus a pancreatic disorder because insulin is secreted in the pancreas. 3. The blood sugar becomes high and glucose appears in urine. 4. There is high blood cholesterol and ketone body formation. 5. Its symptoms are excessive urine production, excessive thirst and excessive eating. Difference # Diabetes Insipidus: 1. It is due to deficiency of ADH. 2. It is, thus a hypothalamic disorder because ADH is secreted in the hypothalamus. 3. The blood glucose is normal and glucose does not appear in urine. 4. There is no such phenomenon. 5. Its symptoms are excretion of large amounts of urine, thirst and dehydration. This Page Is Sponsored By Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus

The word Diabetes is well known and it is mostly associated with a disease involving difficulties with sugar. There are actually two unrelated diseases named Diabetes - Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus. This article is to highlight each and to show the differences between the two. Similarities Both diseases are dependent on the action of hormones; Insulin for Diabetes Mellitus and Vasopressin for Diabetes Insipidus. Insulin is produced in the pancreas. Vasopressin is produced by the Hypothalamus and stored in the pituitary gland. Insulin is necessary for the utilization of sugar/glucose. Vasopressin is the hormone that regulates the body’s retention of water. In both the diseases there are variances derived the same way. A lack of or not enough of the hormone and a specific type of the disease is present. A lack of Insulin and the disease is Diabetes Mellitus Type 1. A lack of Vasopressin and the disease is Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus. When the body is unable to use the hormone effectively another condition is present. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2, when the cells are insulin resistant. When the kidneys are insensitive to vasopressin, Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus (vasopressin-resistant) is the result. During pregnancy, the body is subjected to a multitude of diverse hormones and chemical reactions, caused mostly by the placenta. This hormonal imbalance can cause a temporary disease that occurs only during the pregnancy. The resistance to Insulin results in gestational diabetes mellitus. A deficiency of vasopressin causes gestagenic diabetes insipidus, also known as gestational diabetes insipidus. With both diseases, the body returns to normal shortly (four to six weeks) after the delivery. Diabetes Insipidus have a fourth condition, with no equivalent in diabet Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Main Difference – Diabetes Mellitus vs Diabetes Insipidus Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus are two different medical conditions which arise due to a dysregulation of the endocrine system. Even though they share several similar features, the pathophysiology behind them has significant differences depending on the fundamental etiology and the progression of the pathological changes. The main difference between diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus is that diabetes insipidus involves a problem with the production of antidiuretic hormone or kidney’s response to antidiuretic hormone (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus), whereas diabetes mellitus is caused by a deficiency of the pancreatic hormone insulin. This article covers, 1. What is Diabetes Mellitus? – Definition, Cause, Signs and Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment 2. What is Diabetes Insipidus? – Definition, Cause, Signs and Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment 3. What is the difference between Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus? What is Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes Mellitus is a long term ailment of metabolism that includes Diabetes type 1 and 2 which occur due to a malfunctional pancreas which fails to secrete required amounts of Insulin or poorly functioning insulin either due to an inherent pathology or acquired condition later in life, respectively. It can also happen as a result of excessive blood glucose, which does not respond to the secreted amount of insulin due to a separate mechanism known as Insulin resistance. There are 2 types of Diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is a condition occurring due to the destruction of pancreatic Beta cells by autoimmune cells in the body. The patients rely on insulin injection since the body is not able to produce its own insulin. This condition can affect in Continue reading >>

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