diabetestalk.net

Silent Heart Attack Diabetes

Silent Heart Disease In Diabetes:

Silent Heart Disease In Diabetes: "why Don't I Feel It?"

Whenever something bad happens there is an irrational thought process that causes each of us to try to assess “blame”. This is no different for doctors than it is for other people. I can’t think of anything much stranger than the discussion I hear from physicians after a young patient comes in with a heart attack. You can almost see the gears turning in each doctor’s head. The first thought is that the patient has a family history, high blood pressure, uses cocaine or alcohol or tobacco, has high cholesterol, is diabetic, has congenital heart disease or rheumatic fever or any other problem that differentiates him/her from the doctor. After all, the doctor doesn’t want to feel that this could happen to him/her. The next thought is that the patient must have been doing something to cause this catastrophe (not like the doctor), and certainly the patient should have known that something was wrong. These are common thoughts that people have (doctors included). We don’t want to think that heart attacks can just sneak up and hit us. Unfortunately, not every heart attack is preceded or accompanied by symptoms. This is often not because the patient is ignoring the problem (though sometimes people do this or hide their symptoms from everyone). Approximately 15% of heart attacks are “silent”, meaning that they are discovered during a time when the patient has an electrocardiogram or echocardiogram for another reason. In diabetics, the percentage of heart attacks that are “silent” is somewhat higher (25%). It is thought that this is because there is a problem with the nerves that carry the symptoms of pain to the brain due to the diabetes. Why should we be surprised that a blood vessel can get blocked without a warning? Strokes often happen the same way. No warn Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Heart and vascular disease often go hand in hand with diabetes. People with diabetes are at a much greater risk for heart attacks, strokes, and high blood pressure. Another vascular problem due to diabetes includes poor circulation to the legs and feet. Unfortunately, many of these cardiovascular problems can start early in life and may go undetected for years. Serious cardiovascular disease can begin before the age of 30 in people with diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), damage to the coronary arteries is two to four times more likely in asymptomatic people with type 1 diabetes than in the general population. Because symptoms may be absent at first, the ADA recommends early diagnosis, treatment,, and management of cardiac risk factors. People with diabetes often have changes in their blood vessels that can lead to cardiovascular disease. In people with diabetes, the linings of the blood vessels may become thicker, making it more difficult for blood to flow through the vessels. When blood flow is impaired, heart problems or stroke can occur. Blood vessels can also suffer damage elsewhere in the body due to diabetes, leading to eye problems, kidney problems, and poor circulation to the legs and feet (peripheral arterial disease or PAD). Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a group of metabolic risk factors in one person. People with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk of coronary heart disease, other diseases related to plaque buildup in artery walls (for example, stroke and peripheral arterial disease), and type 2 diabetes, according to the American Heart Association. Risk factors for metabolic syndrome include: Excessive fat tissue in and around the abdomen or a high waist circumference Blood fat disorders that foster plaque buildup i Continue reading >>

Silent Heart Attack

Silent Heart Attack

This site is dedicated to the Silent Heart Attack which is by far the most damaging myocardial infarction (AMI or MI). Twice as many people die from a silent heart attack as compared to those that experienced a myocardial infarction with chess pain. Silent Killer: The key to recovering from a heart attack is the speed as which the patient received treatment. In the case of a silent heart attack, the patient is not aware of the infarction and because valuable time is wasted, the heart becomes permanently damaged. Heart Attack Finding out that your heart is seriouly damaged because you did not act right after a silent attack can be devistating. Many are told they only have a few years left! I'll explain who is most likely to experience these silent killer, but first let me cover the standard heart attack. A heart attack is a very serious and very sudden condition and occurs when a section of the heart does not receive blood. This lack of blood flow can cause the heart tissue to die and scar. Heart attacks can range from mild to severe affecting areas both small and large areas of the heart. Almost always, heart attacks are life threatening and require immediate attention. Silent heart attacks can happen to anyone, but people most likely to experience silent heart attacks are those that have had a prior heart attack, individuals who have diabetes, women, men and women over the age of 65 and those prone to strokes. Individuals taking medication on a regular basis may also experience a silent heart attack. Symptoms of a Silent Heart Attack The best way to identify this disease is through careful study of medical history, ECG (electrocardiogram; measures heart activity) and testing blood for cardiac enzymes. The most important treatment in silent heart attack is restoring the Continue reading >>

Comfortably Numb! Silent Heart Attacks In People With Type 2 Diabetes

Comfortably Numb! Silent Heart Attacks In People With Type 2 Diabetes

Did you know? About 50% of heart attacks are mistaken for acidity or other less serious problems SNEAK PEEK: 1. Diabetes & heart diseases are the biggest killers in India. 2. People with diabetes are more prone to heart diseases. 3. People who have diabetes have high blood sugar levels, high triglycerides, and low HDL levels, which makes them prone to atherosclerosis. 4. People with diabetes are prone to silent heart attacks. 5. Silent heart attacks are heart attacks that are equally lethal. 6. Silent heart attacks come with less intense symptoms,but have same amount of heart muscle damage. 7. To prevent heart and cardiovascular diseases, diabetics have to reduce their triglyceride and low-density cholesterol levels, and increase their high-density cholesterol levels. 8. Maintain healthy diet. 9. Get regular exercise (more than 150 minutes per week). 10. Maintain blood pressure as advised by doctor. 11. Restrict sodium intake. 12. Manage stress. 13. Maintain blood glucose levels. 14. Get periodical medical examinations. 15. Stick to medical advice. Special Heart healthy tips for diabetics The World Heart Day is on September 29th and it is time to bare our heart! Though as a nation India is young at heart, we are faced with a huge burden of heart and cardiovascular diseases. It is estimated that India has witnessed an increase of around 59% in mortality from cardiovascular diseases and there is bad news for people with diabetes if they do not take precautionary measures. The mantra for people with diabetes is strict diabetes control! Heart Diseases and India There seems to be an affinity between heart diseases and India. And, it might be a shocker to many when we reveal the fact that more and more young Indians are falling prey to heart diseases in their prime. It is a f Continue reading >>

Silent Heart Attacks And Type 2 Diabetes

Silent Heart Attacks And Type 2 Diabetes

With commentary by Elsayed Z. Soliman, M.D., MSc., M.S., study senior author and director of the epidemiological cardiology research center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Not all heart attacks announce themselves with Hollywood-style crushing chest pain and a drenching, cold sweat. When researchers from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, checked the hearts and medical records of 9,498 people over nine years, they found1 nearly equal numbers of untreated, silent heart attacks and recognized heart attacks that had received medical attention. A silent heart attack may be missed because the symptoms are mild or seem like another, less-urgent health issue – such as indigestion, heartburn, the flu, fatigue or an ache-y muscle – notes Elsayed Z. Soliman, M.D., MSc., M.S., study senior author and director of the epidemiological cardiology research center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. “People may also decide not to go to the hospital if they’re not sure it’s a heart attack, or if the hospital is far away, they don’t have health insurance or are concerned about the cost of care,” Dr. Soliman told EndocrineWeb.com. But in the study, published May 16 in the journal Circulation, that proved deadly. People who’d had silent heart attacks were three times more likely than those who hadn’t had a heart attack at all to die. Typically, people who’ve had a silent heart attack miss out on emergency care that can save heart muscle during a heart attack such as fast treatment with procedures that open blocked arteries in the heart. They may also miss out on stepped-up attention to blood pressure, cholesterol, diet, exercise and stress afterwards that lower risk Continue reading >>

Diabetic Heart Disease

Diabetic Heart Disease

is heart disease that develops in people with diabetes. Heart disease, also known as cardiovascular disease, refers to conditions that involve narrowed or blocked blood vessels that can cause a heart attack, which is sometimes "silent," or a stroke. People who have diabetes are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease because, over time, high blood sugar can damage blood vessels and nerves that control the heart. Heart attack A heart attack happens when blood flow to the heart is blocked Symptoms of a heart attack include: Pressure, tightness, pain, or a squeezing or aching feeling in your chest or arms Nausea, indigestion, heartburn, or abdominal pain Shortness of breath Cold sweat Fatigue Lightheadedness or sudden dizziness Silent heart attack A silent heart attack is one that has few or no symptoms Stroke A stroke occurs when part of your brain goes without blood for too long Symptoms of a stroke include: Sudden weakness or droopiness of the face, or issues with your vision Sudden weakness or numbness in one or both arms Difficulty speaking, slurred speech, or garbled speech If you experience symptoms of a heart attack or stroke, be sure to seek immediate medical attention. Continue reading >>

What Is A Silent Heart Attack? Silent Heart Attack Symptoms

What Is A Silent Heart Attack? Silent Heart Attack Symptoms

The idea of a silent heart attack that we don’t feel is confusing and scary for most people. When one thinks of a heart attack, we often think of the typical crushing chest pain we are used to seeing on TV. The truth is, most heart attacks do not give you any symptoms. Silent heart attack symptoms: Silent heart attacks either don’t cause any symptoms, or the symptoms they cause are so mild you don’t feel them. The heart itself does not have a way to let you feel pain coming from it. When the heart is hurt, as in a heart attack, the symptoms come from the parts of your body that are around the heart, like the lungs, the pericardium and the stomach. This is what causes the pressure or burning sensation in the center of the chest. If a heart attack happens slowly or is small enough, the parts around the heart can miss it—and so will you. Silent heart attacks tend to occur more often in older people and those with diabetes. Sings of a silent heart attack in older people As we get older, it is harder for us to feel a heart attack. This is probably because the parts of the body responsible for sensing pain or pressure in the chest also get old and less sensitive. This is why older people who show up to the hospital with heart attacks usually complain of something besides the typical chest pain (angina). Most often they say they are out of breath when they were never out of breath before. Diabetes damages some of the nerves responsible for alerting you of a heart attack. This is the reason why diabetics are more likely to experience silent heart attacks. Another reason why a silent heart attack can happen without symptoms is the body’s ability to adjust to changes in blood pressure. When we walk, run or change our position, the heart and the body play a complicated b Continue reading >>

Why Is There An Increased Rate Of Heart Disease?

Why Is There An Increased Rate Of Heart Disease?

Diabetes puts you at risk of heart disease (even if you have ‘normal’ looking cholesterol and no symptoms). This is because diabetes can change the chemical makeup of some of the substances found in the blood and this can cause blood vessels to narrow or to clog up completely. Heart attacks and strokes are up to four times more likely in people with diabetes For this reason, often people with diabetes are on blood pressure lowering medications, often in combination Maintaining fitness with regular physical activity combined with some weight loss can help reduce high blood pressure Diabetes can change the chemical makeup of some of the substances found in the blood and this can cause blood vessels to narrow or to clog up completely. Maintaining fitness with regular physical activity combined with some weight loss can help reduce high blood pressure. Blood pressure lowering medications are often required for people who have diabetes. Symptoms Often people do not know they have heart disease until they develop symptoms like chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness or excessive fatigue when walking or exercising. It is important to note that symptoms may be mild to severe and sometimes there may be none at all. Examples of some other warning symptoms may be: Arm or jaw discomfort Indigestion Weakness Nausea. If you think you are having a heart attack, phone 000 IMMEDIATELY. How can I reduce the risk? One of the most important things to do to reduce the risk of heart disease is to meet with your doctor and/or Credentialled Diabetes Educator to discuss your individual risk factors and how to reduce them. In general terms you can reduce the risk by: Being physically active Losing weight if you are overweight Not smoking Managing blood fats Managing high blood pressure Ta Continue reading >>

The Link Between A Silent Heart Attack (ischemia) And Diabetes

The Link Between A Silent Heart Attack (ischemia) And Diabetes

When a diabetic suffers from a silent heart attack (ischemia), it is also called a silent diabetic heart attack. In other words, the individual won’t even know that they’re having a heart attack. Many people who suffer from one disease are at risk of other diseases. That is certainly the case with diabetes and heart disease, especially when it comes to heart attacks. Take my uncle Phil for example. He’s been a diabetic for about eight years now. I’m telling him he’s also at risk of heart diseases and heart attacks. I even told Phil that type 2 diabetics have the same risk of suffering from a heart attack or dying from heart disease than those with a history of heart attacks. You see adult diabetics have death rates from heart disease approximately two to four times greater than adults without diabetes. In fact, heart disease is the leading cause of death in diabetic patients. Research Suggests That Many Americans Suffer From “Silent” Heart Attacks The scary thing is that many Americans can suffer from these “silent” heart attacks, according to brand new research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association earlier this month. For the study, a research team, led by Dr. David Bluemke from the U.S. National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, analyzed heart scans of participants between the ages of 45 and 84 who were free of heart disease. They enrolled in the study between 2000 and 2002. It wasn’t until 10 years later that study participants underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging with gadolinium to detect for myocardial scarring. The average age of participants at that point was 68. The scans revealed that 146 of the participants, or 7.9%, had scars from a heart attack. From that group, 78% had heart attacks Continue reading >>

Silent Heart Attack

Silent Heart Attack

A heart attack that does not produce the hallmark symptoms of chest pain and difficulty breathing. It is estimated that as many as 4 million Americans have had silent heart attacks, and diabetes raises the risk of having one. A heart attack, also known as a myocardial infarction, occurs when low blood flow to the heart starves it of oxygen, damaging it. Most heart attacks are caused by a blood clot that blocks one of the coronary arteries, the arteries that carry blood and oxygen to the heart muscle. A clot most often forms in a coronary artery that has been narrowed by atherosclerotic plaque. Risk factors for heart attacks include a family history of heart attack, being male, diabetes, older age, high blood pressure, smoking, and blood lipid abnormalities, especially high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels and low HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels. Typically, a heart attack produces chest pain, which may radiate to the arms, shoulders, neck, teeth, jaw, abdomen, or back. Other common symptoms include shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, and anxiety. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should seek medical care immediately. But people with diabetes may not feel these symptoms due to diabetic neuropathy (nerve disease), which can damage the nerves that control the heart, as well as mask the chest and back pain that usually accompanies an attack. Continue reading >>

Heart Disease In Diabetics

Heart Disease In Diabetics

Angina in Diabetics Angina With Diabetes Mellitus CAD risk and Diabetes Cardiac Disease in Diabetes Mellitus Cardiac Disease in Diabetics Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes Mellitus Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetics Coronary Artery Disease in Diabetes Mellitus Coronary Artery Disease in Diabetics Diabetes and Chest Pain Diabetes and Heart Disease Diabetic CAD Diabetic Coronary Artery Disease Diabetic Heart Disease Heart Disease and Stroke in Diabetes Mellitus Heart Disease and Stroke in Diabetics Diabetes is an illness where the body's blood sugar level is too high. If your blood sugar stays too high for a long time, there will be damage to your nerves and blood vessels. This may increase your risk for having a stroke and heart disease. Plaque buildup in the blood vessels Metabolic syndrome − A group of risk factors that raise your chance for heart disease and diabetes. These include high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and high cholesterol, as well as excess body fat around your waist. Insulin resistance − Your body is not able to properly use the insulin that it makes. Insulin helps to lower your blood sugar. You are more likely to have heart disease if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Problems like angina (chest pain) or heart failure after having a heart attack are also more common in diabetics. Often, heart disease exists without any signs like chest pain or shortness of breath. This is called silent ischemia or a silent heart attack. A person with diabetes may not have the usual sign of chest pain. Signs may be vague and mistaken for less serious conditions like indigestion. Some signs include: Feeling weak, dizzy, or tired Muscle pain Heartburn Upset stomach or throwing up Trouble breathing Cold sweats Problems sleeping Neck or jaw pain If you feel any Continue reading >>

How Your Diabetes Can Mask Heart Disease — Or A Heart Attack

How Your Diabetes Can Mask Heart Disease — Or A Heart Attack

If you have diabetes, you likely know that it sometimes causes neuropathy or nerve damage. But you may not realize that diabetes-related neuropathy can sometimes mask the signs of heart disease or cause you to miss important signs of a heart attack. More than two-thirds of people with diabetes will end up having some form of neuropathy. The most common type is peripheral nerve damage, which creates numbness, tingling or weakness in the hands and feet. But there is another, more serious type — autonomic neuropathy — that can damage the nerves that lead to your heart, bladder, intestines and blood vessels. When this occurs, the body is sometimes unable to regulate functions like urination or feel sensations like pain in these areas. This is a double-whammy if you have diabetes. Not only are you at higher risk for neuropathy, but you’re also more likely to have heart disease. If the neuropathy dulls the nerves leading to your heart, you may not notice symptoms of heart disease such as chest pain. Here’s what you need to know. Don’t ignore subtle signs of trouble If you have diabetes, get in tune with your body. Learn to listen closely and act on what it’s telling you. If you have any symptoms of a heart attack, report them to your doctor. Don’t wait to see if the pain goes away. For instance, indigestion that doesn’t pass quickly is sometimes a sign of a heart attack. Make sure to visit your doctor for regular checkups. Annual tests can reveal a problem before symptoms occur. Early treatment can reduce the likelihood that small issues turn into larger ones. What are the signs of a heart attack? If you have neuropathy, symptoms that might be very apparent in someone else are not as noticeable for you. Watch for any of these signs of a possible heart attack: Continue reading >>

7 Silent Signs Of A Heart Attack

7 Silent Signs Of A Heart Attack

istock/Yuri_Arcurs Dr. Stacey E. Rosen, MD, a Go Red For Women cardiologist at North Shore-LIJ Health System, says this is one of the most common symptoms she sees (especially in women heart attack patients). “In my 25 years of practice, people on the verge of a heart attack report feeling tired and not able to do their usual activities,” she says. During a heart attack, blood flow to the heart is reduced, putting extra stress on the muscle, which could make you feel exhausted, according to WebMD. Don’t be afraid to ask your doctor to do an electrocardiogram (EKG), which checks heart activity. “Sometimes when people present with lethargy, doctors won’t immediately order an EKG, which can detect a heart attack; but you should request one from your doctor, just to be safe,” says Annapoorna Kini, MD, of The Mount Sinai Hospital. Here are some other tests for your heart that could save your life. istock/gpointstudio Noticeable pain or soreness in the back, chest, or either arm is often a silent heart attack sign. As MyHeartSisters.org explains it: “When heart muscle cells begin to run out of oxygen during a heart attack because of a blocked artery preventing oxygenated blood from feeding that muscle, they begin to send off pain signals through the nervous system. Your brain may confuse those nerve signals with signals coming from the arm (or the jaw, shoulder, elbow, neck or upper back) because of the nerve proximity.” Because the pain is often not accompanied by the typical chest heaviness associated with heart attack, people tend to ignore it, says Dr. Rosen. “I’ve had patients say they only felt the pain when they were working out, so they assumed it was just from exercise, but that’s not right,” says Rosen. “If the symptom is something new, tha Continue reading >>

The Danger Of “silent” Heart Attacks

The Danger Of “silent” Heart Attacks

About half of all heart attacks are mistaken for less serious problems and can increase your risk of dying from coronary artery disease. You can have a heart attack and not even know it. A silent heart attack, known as a silent myocardial infarction (SMI), account for 45% of heart attacks and strike men more than women. They are described as "silent" because when they occur, their symptoms lack the intensity of a classic heart attack, such as extreme chest pain and pressure; stabbing pain in the arm, neck, or jaw; sudden shortness of breath; sweating, and dizziness. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Tweet Heart disease is a complication that may affect people with diabetes if their condition is not managed well for a prolonged period of time.. Coronary heart disease is recognized to be the cause of death for 80% of people with diabetes, however, the NHS states that heart attacks are largely preventable. [48] How are heart disease and diabetes linked? People suffering from type 1 and type 2 diabetes are more likely to be at risk from heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure. Vascular problems, such as poor circulation to the legs and feet, are also more likely to affect diabetes patients. Like diabetes itself, the symptoms of cardiovascular disease may go undetected for years. A Diabetes UK report from 2007 estimates that the risk of cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes is: [1] 5 times higher in middle aged men 8 times higher in women with diabetes. More than half of type 2 diabetes patients will exhibit signs of cardiovascular disease complications at diagnosis. Who does heart disease affect? Many people think that heart disease only affects the middle-aged and elderly. However, serious cardiovascular disease may develop in diabetics before the age of 30. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetics are at greater risk of developing heart disease. What is the cause of heart disease amongst diabetics? Hyperglycemia, which characterises diabetes, in combination with free fatty acids in the blood can change the makeup of blood vessels, and this can lead to cardiovascular disease. The lining of the blood vessels may become thicker, and this in turn can impair blood flow. Heart problems and the possibility of stroke can occur. What symptoms can identify heart disease? The following are common symptoms of heart disease, although this may vary from individual to indiv Continue reading >>

More in diabetes