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Signs Of Diabetes Type 2

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Introduction Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin This topic is about type 2 diabetes. Read more about type 1 diabetes Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth. Symptoms of diabetes The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. Typical symptoms include: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk Read more about the symptoms of type 2 diabetes It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible as it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Causes of type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. This means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and tends to be diagnosed in older people. It's far more common than type 1 diabetes. Read about the causes and risk factors for type 2 diabetes Treating type 2 diabetes As type 2 diabetes usually gets worse, you may eventually need medication – usually tablets – to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Read mor Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. This often makes it seem like signs and symptoms of diabetes appear suddenly. That’s why it’s important to pay attention to your body, rather than simply brushing them off. To that end, here are some type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms that you may want to watch out for: If you’re experiencing frequent urination your body might be telling you that your kidneys are trying to expel excess sugar in your blood. The resulting dehydration may then cause extreme thirst. Along the same lines, the lack of available fluids may also give you dry mouth and itchy skin. If you experience increased hunger or unexpected weight loss it could be because your body isn’t able to get adequate energy from the food you eat. High blood sugar levels can affect blood flow and cause nerve damage, which makes healing difficult. So having slow-healing cuts/sores is also a potential sign of diabetes. Yeast infections may occur in men and women who have diabetes as a result of yeast feeding on glucose. Other signs of diabetes Pay attention if you find yourself feeling drowsy or lethargic; pain or numbness in your extremities; vision changes; fruity or sweet-smelling breath which is one of the symptoms of high ketones; and experiencing nausea or vomiting—as these are additional signs that something is not right. If there’s any question, see your doctor immediately to ensure that your blood sugar levels are safe and rule out diabetes. So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of… Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes often goes undiagnosed because many of its symptoms seem so harmless. But with early detection of diabetes and treatment, the risk of developing diabetes-related complications can be reduced. If you have one or more of these symptoms, see your doctor right away! Frequent infections Blurred vision Dry, itchy skin Cuts/bruises that are slow to heal Problems with sexual function Tingling/numbness in the hands/feet Recurring skin, gum, or bladder infections Common symptoms of high blood sugar: Increased thirst Increased urination Fatigue Unexplained weight loss Unexplained infection Heavy breathing Prediabetes Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they may have "prediabetes" which means their blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Long term damage to the body, especially the heart and circulatory system, may be occurring during prediabetes. Fortunately, there are things you can do to prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes. No Symptoms? You May Be At Risk For Developing Diabetes Some people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms. You May be at Risk for diabetes if you: Are over the age of forty Are African American, Pacific Island, Hispanic or Native American Have family members who have diabetes Have been diagnosed with high blood pressure Are not physically active Are overweight Have an A1C level more than 5.7% (A1C is a blood test) Have a fasting blood glucose level of 100-125 mg/dL or non-fasting level of 140- 199mg/dL Have a HDL cholesterol level less than 35 mg/dL Have a triglyceride level more than 250 mg/dL Are a women with polycystic ovary syndrome Have a history of cardiovascular disease in your family With education, physical activity, medication and monitoring you should be able to reduce Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms The symptoms of diabetes include feeling very thirsty, passing more urine than usual, and feeling tired all the time. The symptoms occur because some or all of the glucose stays in your blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to get rid of the excess glucose in your urine. The main symptoms, which are common to both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, are: urinating more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired unexplained weight loss cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision – caused by the lens of the eye becoming dry The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes are usually obvious and develop very quickly, often over a few weeks. These signs and symptoms aren't always as obvious, however, and it's often diagnosed during a routine check-up. This is because they are often mild and develop gradually over a number of years. This means you may have type 2 diabetes for many years without realising it. See your GP as soon as possible if you think you may have diabetes. Early diagnosis and treatment for type 2 diabetes is very important as it may reduce your risk of developing complications later on. Hyperglycaemia Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach, can't produce enough insulin to control your blood glucose level, or when the cells in your body don't respond properly to the insulin that is produced. This means your blood glucose levels may become very high, and is known as hyperglycaemia. Hyperglycaemia can occur for several reasons, including: eating too much being unwell ineffective diabetes medication, or not taking enough Hyperglycaemia causes the main symptoms of diabetes, which include extreme thirst and frequent urination. Next review due: 27/06/2018 Type 2 diabetes occurs when t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children: Signs, Symptoms And Prevention

Type 2 Diabetes In Children: Signs, Symptoms And Prevention

In 2009, more than 20,000 individuals under 20 years old were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. That’s probably lower than the actual number because some children or teenagers may not even know they have type 2 diabetes. Most of the new cases are in youth 10-19 years old. Type 2 diabetes is still pretty rare in children under 10 years. As with adults, the rates of type 2 diabetes are higher in certain populations. African-Americans, Hispanic and Latinos, Asian Americans and American Indians are at higher risk for developing this disease. What’s the sign? The signs and symptoms of diabetes are the same in youth as they are in adults. Drinking and urinating more than usual and having low energy are a few of the signs that may signal diabetes. Usually, but not always, there is a strong family history; a close relative, parent, aunt, uncle or grandparent has diabetes—so that’s a clue. "Teaching about proper nutrition and exercise in children can guide them in the right direction." The youth could be overweight or obese and may have a dark, velvety line around his or her neck, underarms, etc. This discoloration is called “acanthosis nigricans” and is linked with “insulin resistance” and type 2 diabetes. If any of these items are present, it’s important to see the doctor for proper evaluation. Hard consequences There is good news and bad news for type 2 diabetes and youth. We’ll start with the bad news first. In youth, the outcomes are not good if early diabetes or diabetes isn’t immediately managed. It appears that diabetes is more serious in children than in adults. There are also less treatment options. The good news is that bad habits in youth are not as deep rooted as they are in adults. Teaching about proper nutrition and exercise in children can gui Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

font size A A A 1 2 3 4 5 Next What is Type 2 Diabetes? The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes, formerly called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or "adult onset" diabetes, so-called because it typically develops in adults over age 35, though it can develop at any age. Type 2 diabetes is diagnosed more often in people who are overweight or obese, and who are not physically active. Type 2 diabetes is an illness in which the body does not process ingested sugars (glucose) properly. In type 2, the body usually produces some insulin, but not enough to allow the glucose into the cells for the body to use as energy. In addition, there can be insulin resistance, where it becomes difficult for the body to use the insulin produced. Type 2 diabetes is seen both in men and in women, though men have a slightly higher incidence of developing the disease. It can also be diagnosed in children, even though typically it is seen in adults. What Causes Type 2 Diabetes? Several factors can cause type 2 diabetes, such as insulin resistance, heredity, being obese or overweight, lack of physical activity, abnormal glucose production by the liver, metabolic syndrome, problems with cell signaling, and beta cell dysfunction. Insulin resistance is a condition where the body still produces insulin but is unable to use it properly. It is more commonly seen in people who are overweight or obese, and lead a sedentary lifestyle. This leads to a buildup of glucose (sugar) in the blood, which can result in prediabetes or diabetes. Certain genes that affect insulin production rather than insulin resistance are a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. Family history of diabetes is a risk factor, and people of certain races or ethnicities are at higher risk, including African Americ Continue reading >>

11 Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

11 Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Learning about the symptoms of type 2 diabetes brings you closer to having a better understanding of the condition. Known as “the silent killer” because it doesn’t necessarily cause any obvious symptoms, type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed when a doctor orders blood tests. In some cases, doctors don’t detect diabetes until long-term complications associated with the disease develop, like eye diseases and heart problems. Most symptoms of type 2 diabetes can be easily managed or prevented by checking your blood sugar levels tested regularly. If you think you may have diabetes, seek treatment as soon as possible. The better you manage diabetes over time, the less like you are to develop serious complications. 1. Frequent Need to Urinate Medically known as polyuria, this symptom can be an early sign of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. When blood sugar levels became elevated (above 160-180 mg/dL), glucose starts to leak into the urine. As the amount of glucose in the urine increases, the kidneys start to work harder to eliminate more water in an attempt to dilute the urine. As a result, a diabetic will feel the urge to urinate more often. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Risk Factors, Signs & Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes: Risk Factors, Signs & Treatment

As many as 57 million people in the United States are on the path to becoming diabetic. Over 90% of them will be type 2 diabetics. But, what is this disease, and why has it become so prevalent? This lesson explores the risk factors, symptoms, and treatment of type 2 diabetes. Definition and Risk Factors Have you ever heard someone talk about a friend or relation who has 'sugar?' It's a too sweet term for a serious condition. Diabetes mellitus, usually just called diabetes, is a condition in which the body is unable to use glucose properly. Diabetics mostly fall into one of two groups, based on what factors cause the disease. Unlike type 1 diabetes, which is caused by a lack of insulin in the body, type 2 diabetes, is a condition caused by either the body's inability to make enough insulin, or an inability to use the insulin it makes. Before we get any further, let's review how a healthy body provides its cells with the energy it needs for metabolism. After a healthy person eats a meal, the body breaks it down into simpler parts for the cells to use. Many carbohydrates are broken down into a simple sugar called glucose, which is absorbed by the small intestine, where it enters the bloodstream to be transported to cells. But, glucose can't enter the cells without the help of the protein hormone responsible for helping get glucose into cells, insulin. Insulin is made in the beta cells of the pancreas and is released when blood glucose levels are high. So normally, when blood glucose levels go up, insulin is secreted, and glucose gets stashed away in the cells, where it's either used for energy or stored, usually in the form of starch or fat. This makes blood glucose levels go back down. In type 2 diabetes, though, even though there is insulin present, and many times plenty Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

There is an increase in the number of cases of type 2 diabetes in children and teens. The rise may be due to obesity and decreased physical activity among children. The risk for type 2 diabetes increases with age. What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder resulting from the body's inability to produce enough, or to properly use, insulin. It has previously been called non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Without enough insulin, the body cannot move blood sugar into the cells. It is a chronic disease with no known cure. What is prediabetes? In prediabetes, blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be defined as diabetes. However, many people with prediabetes develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years, states the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Prediabetes also increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. With modest weight loss and moderate physical activity, people with prediabetes can delay or prevent type 2 diabetes. What causes type 2 diabetes? The exact cause of type 2 diabetes is unknown. However, there is an inherited susceptibility which causes it to run in families. Although a person can inherit a tendency to develop type 2 diabetes, it usually takes another factor, such as obesity, to bring on the disease. Prevention or delay of onset of type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes may be prevented or delayed by following a program to eliminate or reduce risk factors, particularly losing weight and increasing exercise. Information gathered by the Diabetes Prevention Program, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association, continues to study this possibility. What are the symptoms of type 2 diabetes? The following are the most common symptoms for Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms And Causes

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms And Causes

The symptoms of diabetes type 2 can be subtle and confusing. But the type 2 diabetes causes are clear. And since diabetes is skyrocketing all around the world, it only makes good common-sense to learn what causes diabetes type 2 and the basic type 2 diabetes symptoms. About 26 million American adults and children currently have diabetes. And worldwide the figure is estimated to be over 345 million. But here’s the really scary part. Diabetes research shows that these numbers are expected to double within the next 20 years. What Causes Diabetes Type 2? Type 2 diabetes is the result of insulin resistance. Your body makes enough insulin, but your cells aren’t healthy enough to use it. This causes serious blood sugar problems that, over time, can damage your eyes, kidneys, nerves, blood vessels and heart. Based on analyzing diabetes research, it’s evident what causes diabetes. Although a tendency towards the disease can be hereditary, studies show type 2 diabetes is the result of our “modern” lifestyle of poor diet, lack of exercise and overeating. Even when it doesn’t kill you, diabetes greatly increases your risk of: strokes, blindness, heart attack, kidney failure, nerve damage, limb amputation, sexual dysfunction. And every 10 seconds someone dies from a diabetes-related cause. As a matter of fact, diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure, impotence and limb amputations. And every 30 seconds, someone with diabetes has a diabetes-related amputation. Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes The two most common red flag diabetes symptoms are: Unquenchable thirst. This is due to excess glucose circulating throughout the body and drawing water from tissues, which creates a feeling of dehydration. Increased urination. To quench the thirst caused by diabetes, t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms & Causes

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms & Causes

Because our research informs our treatment, our diabetes team is known for our innovative treatments and science-driven approach. Boston Children's Hospital is home to the world’s most extensive pediatric hospital research enterprise, and we partner with elite health care and biotech organizations around the globe. But as specialists in family-centered care, our physicians never forget that your child is precious, and not just a patient. In dealing with your child’s diabetes, you probably want to know the basics about what diabetes is, and how type 2 diabetes differs from other forms of the disease. What are the major forms of diabetes? Diabetes (diabetes mellitus) is a lifelong condition that occurs when the body doesn’t make enough insulin, or when the body doesn’t respond properly to the insulin it makes. There are many forms of diabetes mellitus, several of which have undergone name changes as the disease has become better understood. type 2 diabetes: Formerly known as “adult onset” or “non-insulin dependent” diabetes, type 2 diabetes typically occurs in people who are overweight, physically inactive and over age 40, although more and more children are developing type 2 diabetes, possibly because of childhood obesity. Some children need insulin; others can control their diabetes with healthful eating and exercise, or oral medicines (hypoglycemic agents). type 1 diabetes: Formerly known as “juvenile” or “insulin-dependent” diabetes, type 1 diabetes is caused by the immune system’s failure to recognize the beta cells as belonging to the body, so it attacks and destroys them. This is why type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease. Children with type 1 diabetes must take insulin injections every day. maturity onset diabetes of youth (M Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

A A A Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a chronic medical condition that results from an inability of the body to properly use insulin. Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes, in which the body is unable to produce sufficient levels of insulin. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes include A fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dl or greater on two different days establishes the diagnosis of diabetes. A number of both oral and injectable medications have been developed fo A hemoglobin A1c (HBA1c) level of 6.5% or greater indicates diabetes. Managing type 2 diabetes includes following a healthy eating plan and exercise, as well as medications in many cases. r the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A healthy eating plan and regular physical activity are important components of a type 2 diabetes treatment plan. There is no one recommended "diabetes diet" for all people with type 2 diabetes. Regular physical activity and modest weight loss can help reduce or prevent type 2 diabetes. Common complications of diabetes include cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, eye problems, and nerve damage. A A A Type 2 Diabetes (cont.) Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is an elevated level of sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream due to the body's inability to properly respond to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that allows the body to utilize glucose for energy. Insulin is produced by specialized cells in the pancreas. An elevated level of blood glucose is known as hyperglycemia. The excessive levels of glucose in the blood spill over into the urine, leading to the presence of glucose in the urine (glucosuria). Type 2 diabetes is an enormous public health problem. It is estimated that about 29.1 million Americans (9.1% of all Americans) have Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

My 14-year-old Indoor Cat Is Losing Weight. What Can I Do Or Feed Him To Help Put On More Weight?

My 14-year-old Indoor Cat Is Losing Weight. What Can I Do Or Feed Him To Help Put On More Weight?

Weight loss in cats between the ages of 12 and 16 is usually a sign of illness. The five most common causes in this age range are hyperthyroidism, kidney disease (particularly with secondary kidney infection), diabetes mellitus, intestinal disease (inflammatory or lymphoma) and cancer. The best way to find out which a cat might have is to get them a thorough physical exam by an experienced cat veterinarian (someone who knows that cats should live to be at least 17 years old) and simple bloodwork to rule in or out the top three. All of these are easily treated if the disease is not too advanced. Even cats with kidney disease can be treated and have comfortable lives for many years if you and the cat are willing to undertake daily oral medication (in more advanced cases), special diets, periodic blood pressure testing and frequent cultures of urine to monitor for infection. (Cats with even minor kidney disease are at high risk for high blood pressure which causes further damage to kidneys and eyes.) Blood pressure must be taken by the doppler method to get accurate results for cats. Other methods are accurate for dogs, but not cats. If the answer is not in the above three, more attention to history might be in order. If the cat has a history of vomiting more than 1 to 2 times per month or soft or very hard stools, intestinal disease is very high on the possibility list. The best tests for this possibility are ultrasound and a set of blood tests called a GI panel. The ultrasound could show gall bladder disease that can cause nausea and decreased appetite as well as abdominal pain and reduced ability to digest food properly as well as thickening of the intestines or pancreatic abnormalities. As far as the blood tests, they measure vitamin absorption and pancreatic inflammat Continue reading >>

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