diabetestalk.net

Signs Of Diabetes Reddit

Diabetic Neuropathy—the Agony Of Da Feet

Diabetic Neuropathy—the Agony Of Da Feet

[Editor’s note: In recognition of American Diabetes Month, Harvard Health Publications is collaborating with MSN.com on its Stop Diabetes initiative. Today’s post, published on World Diabetes Day, is the first of several focusing on this all-too-common disorder.] People tend to think of diabetes as a silent, painless condition. Don’t tell that to the millions of folks with diabetes-induced tingling toes or painful feet. This problem, called diabetic neuropathy, can range from merely aggravating to disabling or even life threatening. It’s something I have first-hand (or, more appropriately, first-foot) knowledge about. High blood sugar, the hallmark of diabetes, injures nerves and blood vessels throughout the body. The first nerves to be affected tend to be the smallest ones furthest from the spinal cord—those that stretch to the toes and feet. Diabetic neuropathy affects different people in different ways. I feel it as a tingling in my toes. Moving my feet and wiggling my toes helps the tingling disappear for a while. Others have it much worse. Diabetic neuropathy can cause a constant burning feeling in the feet; sharp pain that may be worse at night; and extreme sensitivity to touch, making the weight of a sheet unbearable. It can be sneaky, too, and completely rob the feet of their ability to sense pain. The truly scary thing about diabetic neuropathy is a 10-letter word we usually associate with horrific accidents or Civil War battlefields—amputation. When sensory nerves in the feet become damaged, a blister, cut, or sore can go unnoticed, allowing time for the wound to become infected. Infections that cause tissue to die (gangrene) and that spread to the bone may be impossible to treat with cleansing and antibiotics. Diabetes accounts for about 70,000 lo Continue reading >>

You Might Have Diabetes And Not Even Know It

You Might Have Diabetes And Not Even Know It

“Do I have diabetes?” probably isn’t something you’ve asked yourself today — but maybe it should be. Diabetes is one of the biggest killers of Americans, but a sizeable chunk of people with the disease don’t know they have it. A new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that of the 30.3 million people in the U.S. with diabetes (as of 2015), 7.2 million are undiagnosed. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, only 11.6 percent know it. The CDC report accounts for people suffering from either chronic Type 1 diabetes — a condition that develops at a young age — or Type 2 diabetes. However, people with Type 1 diabetes only account for a small percentage of people, while Type 2 diabetes accounts for 95 percent of cases in the United States. Why diabetes can be deadly At the very basic level, diabetes occurs when the body doesn’t process insulin correctly, resulting in higher-than-normal levels of glucose in blood and urine. Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes can be regulated with medicine, but left untreated it can lead to serious — and even deadly — complications, like heart disease, kidney damage, nerve damage and more, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. The signs and symptoms of diabetes People with diabetes have it for long periods of time without experiencing symptoms. "Symptoms may include feeling sweaty, jitters, a sense of doom, light-headedness,” Dr. Susan Spratt, an endocrinologist and assistant professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine, told CBS News. Excessive thirst, dry mouth and extreme fatigue are also warning signs. “If someone doesn't have a diagnosis of diabetes and is feeling these things, they should get screened," added Dr. Spratt. Can Continue reading >>

We Ran Hillary Clinton’s Symptoms Through Webmd And The Diagnosis Isn’t Pretty

We Ran Hillary Clinton’s Symptoms Through Webmd And The Diagnosis Isn’t Pretty

Hillary Clinton’s health has become the focus of many people’s concerns, so, with the help of WebMD, The Daily Caller offers up the following diagnosis. (RELATED: Limbaugh On Clinton’s LONG Bathroom Break: ‘Where Are Her Medical Records?’ [VIDEO]) According to a WebMD diagnosis, the 68-year-old Clinton should really check to see if she has a urinary tract infection. The symptoms, as observed by TheDC and entered into WebMD include fatigue, mood swings, swelling, weight gain, impaired judgment, confusion, slurring words, frequent urination, and bald spots. These symptoms characterize such possible conditions as — in order of likelihood — urinary tract infection (UTI), medication reaction or side-effect, overeating, depression, Type 2 Diabetes, hypothyroidism, acute sinusitis or acute stress reaction. Arriving at these symptoms was made possible by scouring the selected medical records released by her doctor Lisa Bardack, and news reports relating to her mental and physical comings and goings. Clinton’s latest physical from March 21, 2015 indicates the haggard presidential candidate deals with hypothyroidism and seasonal allergies, and she is on a long-term anticoagulant. In 1998 and 2009, Clinton faced deep vein thrombosis. TheDC added to her list of medical issues the impaired judgment obvious in her use of a private email server to conduct work business while she was secretary of state. The symptom of confusion has also been documented by a person in Clinton’s inner circle. In emails from Clinton’s aide Huma Abedin, Abedin wrote Clinton was “often confused.” (RELATED: Abedin Email: Hillary Clinton ‘Often Confused’) Then, in the aftermath of Clinton’s daylong testimony before the House Benghazi Committee, Matt Drudge tweeted his concern abo Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a buildup of acids in your blood. It can happen when your blood sugar is too high for too long. It could be life-threatening, but it usually takes many hours to become that serious. You can treat it and prevent it, too. It usually happens because your body doesn't have enough insulin. Your cells can't use the sugar in your blood for energy, so they use fat for fuel instead. Burning fat makes acids called ketones and, if the process goes on for a while, they could build up in your blood. That excess can change the chemical balance of your blood and throw off your entire system. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for ketoacidosis, since their bodies don't make any insulin. Your ketones can also go up when you miss a meal, you're sick or stressed, or you have an insulin reaction. DKA can happen to people with type 2 diabetes, but it's rare. If you have type 2, especially when you're older, you're more likely to have a condition with some similar symptoms called HHNS (hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome). It can lead to severe dehydration. Test your ketones when your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dL or you have symptoms of high blood sugar, such as dry mouth, feeling really thirsty, or peeing a lot. You can check your levels with a urine test strip. Some glucose meters measure ketones, too. Try to bring your blood sugar down, and check your ketones again in 30 minutes. Call your doctor or go to the emergency room right away if that doesn't work, if you have any of the symptoms below and your ketones aren't normal, or if you have more than one symptom. You've been throwing up for more than 2 hours. You feel queasy or your belly hurts. Your breath smells fruity. You're tired, confused, or woozy. You're having a hard time breathing. Continue reading >>

Do I Have Diabetes? Quick Quiz To Show If Symptoms Mean It's Time To See Doctor

Do I Have Diabetes? Quick Quiz To Show If Symptoms Mean It's Time To See Doctor

Diabetes is a metabolic disease in which the body does not properly regulate blood sugar levels. Blood sugar, or glucose, is critical to the function of major organs, including the brain, and thus if symptoms of the disease are ignored and the condition left undiagnosed, diabetes can lead to serious health issues and even death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 21 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with diabetes. Unfortunately, the CDC also estimates there are another 8.1 million people who have not sought treatment for their symptoms and remain undiagnosed. The three main types of diabetes are Type 1, Type 2 and gestational. According to the American Diabetes Association, Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. Type 2 is the most common form of the disease and is the result of insulin resistance, and gestational diabetes occurs around the 24th week of pregnancy. ALERT: Reverse Type 2 Diabetes. New Strategies Show How. Diabetes presents with many telltale symptoms and if the answer to many, but not necessarily all, of the questions below is "yes" it may mean it's time to see a doctor and schedule a diabetes test. 1. Are you experiencing increased thirst? This symptom of diabetes is one that can increase gradually so a review of your water intake history may be in order. 2. Do you need to urinate more frequently? This can be the result of an increased intake of fluids due to excessive thirst. In addition, according to Everyday Health, "When there is excess glucose present in the blood, as with type 2 diabetes, the kidneys react by flushing it out of the blood into the urine. This results in more urine production and the need to urinate m Continue reading >>

“in A Situation Of Rescuing Life”: Meanings Given To Diabetes Symptoms And Care-seeking Practices Among Adults In Southeastern Tanzania: A Qualitative Inquiry

“in A Situation Of Rescuing Life”: Meanings Given To Diabetes Symptoms And Care-seeking Practices Among Adults In Southeastern Tanzania: A Qualitative Inquiry

Abstract Diabetes mellitus is an emerging public health problem in Tanzania. For the community and the health system to respond adequately to this problem, it is important that we understand the meanings given to its symptoms, and the care-seeking practices of individuals. Methods To explore collective views on the meanings given to diabetes symptoms, we conducted nine focus group discussions with adult diabetes patients and members of the general community. To gain a better understanding of how the meanings in the community inform the care-seeking practices of individuals, 19 in-depth interviews were conducted with diabetes patients. The data were analyzed using principles of grounded theory and applying cultural schema theory as a deductive framework. In the communities and among the patients, knowledge and awareness of diabetes are limited. Both people with diabetes and community members referred to their prevailing cultural meaning systems and schemas for infectious diseases to interpret and assign meaning to the emerging symptoms. Diabetes patients reported that they had initially used anti-malarial medicines because they believed their symptoms—like headache, fever, and tiredness—were suggestive of malaria. Schemas for body image informed the meaning given to diabetes symptoms similar to those of HIV, like severe weight loss. Confusion among members of the community about the diabetes symptoms instigated tension, causing patients to be mistrusted and stigmatized. The process of meaning-giving and the diagnosis of the diabetes symptoms was challenging for both patients and health care professionals. Diabetes patients reported being initially misdiagnosed and treated for other conditions by medical professionals. The inability to assign meaning to the symptoms a Continue reading >>

Early Signs Of Low Testosterone

Early Signs Of Low Testosterone

Maintaining testosterone production as you age is probably more important for your health than you think. Low testosterone levels in men can leave them more susceptible to some very serious conditions including cancer of the testicules, kidney disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Low testosterone can also cause problems in women including fatigue, depression, decreased libido, depression, and type 2 diabetes. Early detection is the key to minimizing the chances that a patient with low testosterone will develop any of these conditions. If you notice that you’re exhibiting any or several of the symptoms listed below, you might want to have your blood tested to check your testosterone level. In particular, men are encouraged by doctors to have their testosterone levels measured as they age regardless of whether or not they are showing any symptoms. Early symptoms that could indicate low testosterone Fatigue: Fatigue can be a symptom of a very wide range of conditions, so it’s important not to jump to conclusions. However, if fatigue is persistent and doesn’t seem to go away even when you’ve gotten a lot of rest, low testosterone could be the problem. Muscle weakness: One of the most important roles testosterone plays in the bodies of both men and women is building up the muscles. If you have low testosterone, you will notice a lessening in muscle mass that is not improved even if you implement a weight training regime. Decreased sex drive: We assume that it’s normal for a person’s sex drive to gradually diminish as he or she ages. However, a significantly decreased sex drive could be the sign of a health problem. Both men and women will notice that their sex drive diminishes if their bodies start producing less testosterone. Erectile dysfunction: One of the m Continue reading >>

11 Things Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

11 Things Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

1. There is no "mild form" of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is when the body doesn't produce any insulin, while type 2 diabetes is when the body doesn't make enough insulin or the insulin it does make doesn't work properly. There's a myth that type 2 is the milder form – but it's false. "It is a commonly held belief that type 2 is the mild form and less serious than type 1 diabetes. This is in fact not true, as both type 1 and 2 diabetes can lead to serious health problems such as blindness, amputation, kidney disease, heart disease, and stroke, if not managed well. "Type 1 diabetes can be sudden onset, where a person may become quite unwell very quickly, whereas type 2 diabetes can go undetected for a number of years. Both types of diabetes need to be treated as soon as possible to avoid diabetes-related complications." – Deepa Khatri, clinical adviser, Diabetes UK 2. You don't get it from "eating too much sugar". "I didn't get it from eating too much sugar. There's nothing I can't eat or drink. And type 1 and type 2 are two completely different conditions. There's two types, I'm talking about type 1, the autoimmune condition. There's nothing I did to get it, there's nothing I could have done to prevent it, and it's not contagious. "No, it's not because I ate too much sugar as a kid, and yes, I can still eat that bit of cake. I can eat anything I want, and I can do pretty much what I want when I want to do it – my T1 doesn't hold me back in any way. It's a lot more than just taking a couple of insulin injections though – there's a lot more to it." – Connor McHarg 3. And it's a serious illness. "One of my major frustrations is that people tend not to view diabetes as a 'serious' illness and will go as far to say that it's self-inflicted due to certain lifestyle ch Continue reading >>

How Did You Find Out You Had Diabetes?

How Did You Find Out You Had Diabetes?

Sometimes diabetes can be relatively simple to self-diagnose (as long as you know the symptoms to watch out for), while other times it can go unnoticed for several years, not causing any noticeable symptoms. The way people find out about their diabetes can vary widely as well. Sometimes its a loved one or a relative stranger who points out the symptoms rather than a doctor. And occasionally it takes a near-fatal experience to get a diagnosis. If you see the symptoms of diabetes or any other disease in another person, be sure to point it out to them. Your words may be just what they need to hear to take the first step toward diagnosis, treatment and, ultimately, a healthier life. So what made you go to the doctor? How did you find out you had diabetes? Below, several Reddit users share their stories. Note: Some comments have been edited for length, punctuation, and spelling. The Common Cold “I actually went to see my doctor about a cold. While getting checked out, she asked how long it had been since my last checkup. Because I hadn’t had insurance, it had been a few years. She ran a simple blood test and that is how I found out.” —Reddit user enkhi A Know-It-All Sister “My sister was home for Christmas after her first term of nursing school. Like most people do with their first taste of knowledge, she was diagnosing everyone with everything. She saw me drink a 4l pitcher of water while waiting for my meal at a restaurant and diagnosed me on the spot. I was the only one she got right.” —Reddit user badgerpapa A Hair Stylist Who’s Got Your Back “Lost 80lbs in about 3 months, had all the classic diabetes symptoms, but my hair ended up shedding like crazy within the month prior to diagnosis (you could touch it, and hair would fall out). I went to my hair st Continue reading >>

Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy Affects Symptom Generation And Brain-gut Axis

Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy Affects Symptom Generation And Brain-gut Axis

OBJECTIVE Long-term diabetes leads to severe peripheral, autonomous, and central neuropathy in combination with clinical gastrointestinal symptoms. The brain-gut axis thus expresses a neurophysiological profile, and heart rate variability (HRV) can be correlated with clinical gastrointestinal symptoms. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fifteen healthy volunteers and 15 diabetic patients (12 with type 1 diabetes) with severe gastrointestinal symptoms and clinical suspicion of autonomic neuropathy were included. Psychophysics and evoked brain potentials were assessed after painful rectosigmoid electrostimulations, and brain activity was modeled by brain electrical source analysis. Self-reported gastrointestinal symptoms (per the Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Disorder Severity Symptom Index) and quality of life (SF-36 Short Form Survey) were collected. RESULTS Diabetic patients had autonomous neuropathy, evidenced by decreased electrocardiographic R-R interval (P = 0.03) and lower HRV (P = 0.008). Patients were less sensitive to painful stimulation (P = 0.007), had prolonged latencies of evoked potentials (P ≤ 0.001), and showed diminished amplitude of the N2–P2 component in evoked potentials (P = 0.01). There was a caudoanterior shift of the insular brain source (P = 0.01) and an anterior shift of the cingulate generator (P = 0.01). Insular source location was associated with HRV assessments (all P < 0.02), and the shift (expressed in mm) correlated negatively with physical health (P < 0.001) and positively with nausea (P = 0.03) and postprandial fullness (P = 0.03). Cingulate source shift was correlated negatively with physical health (P = 0.005) and positively with postprandial fullness (P ≤ 0.001). CONCLUSIONS This study provides evidence for interaction Continue reading >>

5 Signs You Have Diabetes But Had No Idea

5 Signs You Have Diabetes But Had No Idea

You'll never see it coming. And when you do, it's often too late. Diabetes is one of those silent killers. It's a disease that creeps up on you and turns your entire life upside down in the blink of an eye. It's commonly misdiagnosed and by the time it is diagnosed for what it is, the damage has been done. If caught too late, diabetes can kill you or someone you love. Know the signs. Learn them so you can recognize symptoms when you see them, because a doctor might not catch it in time. 1. Extreme thirst and hunger If your mouth is always dry and you're drinking a ton of water, but can't seem to get any relief, it's a sure sign of diabetes. More than that, if you're eating and eating, but are always hungry (and not gaining weight), take notice. With diabetes, the body is hungrier because your insulin levels are unbalanced - insulin helps bring glucose from food into the cells and convert them to energy,according to WebMd. You're thirstier because diabetes raises blood sugar levels and prevents your kidneys from taking in glucose, which tells your body to make more urine (which takes fluid). These unbalanced levels makes you hungrier and thirstier and yet, no matter how much you eat or drink, it makes little to no difference. 2. Frequent urination Because your body is lacking insulin, the body seeks out other ways to break down the sugar. So it uses the fluids from cells in the bloodstream and sends them to the kidneys, making them overwork and forcing you to urinate more and more. If you're taking far more bathroom breaks than usual, go to the doctor and test your blood sugar. 3. Major weight loss A common sign of diabetes, especially in Type 1, is extreme weight loss. When the pancreas stops working completely, the body finds other ways to break down the blood glucose. Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes Reddit

Signs Of Diabetes Reddit

What are the signs and symptoms of diabetic heart disease? also, diabetes-related nerve damage can interfere with pain signals in the body.. Reddit: the front page of the internet use the following search parameters to narrow your results: subreddit:subreddit. Common symptoms or signs of diabetes are; extreme thirst, frequent urination, sudden vision changes sugar in urine and more. learn the signs early on.. Warning Signs of Diabetes You Shouldn’t Ignore | Instiks" src="title="Warning Signs Of Type II Diabetes" width="80%"> 10 warning signs of diabetes you shouldn’t ignore | instiks ★ diabetes cure reddit ★ ::the 3 step trick that reverses diabetes permanently in as little as 11 days.[ diabetes cure reddit ] the real cause of diabetes (and. ★ diabetes cure reddit ★ ::the 3 step trick that reverses diabetes permanently in as little as 11 days.[ diabetes cure reddit ] the real cause of diabetes (and. ★diabetes fact sheets signs symptoms★ diabetes kit. diabetes fact sheets signs symptoms diabetes testing in children diet diabetic blood glucose test results.. Continue reading >>

Dermatologist Basking Ridge - 12 Ridge St., Basking Ridge, Nj, 07920 - (908) 766-7546

Dermatologist Basking Ridge - 12 Ridge St., Basking Ridge, Nj, 07920 - (908) 766-7546

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. 1. Yellow, reddish, or brown patches on your skin This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. 2. Darker area of skin that feels like velvet A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers ca Continue reading >>

Question & Answer

Question & Answer

Is sudden weight loss a sign of diabetes? If so, why? Answer: Kimberly Buss, M.D., M.P.H. Weight loss can occur for many reasons, and involuntary weight loss can be a sign of serious underlying illness. Involuntary weight loss can happen even with an increased appetite or thirst. Some causes of this situation can include intestinal disorders that cause lack of absorption of food (like chronic diarrhea), endocrine disorders that cause the body to burn more energy (like hyperthyroidism), and uncontrolled diabetes, which causes the body to lose excess calories by spilling sugar into the urine. Diabetes is a disorder of elevated blood sugars. Sometimes sugars are just mildly elevated at diagnosis. But sometimes blood sugar can become quite elevated before the diagnosis is made. As the blood sugar level goes up, the body cannot reabsorb all of the sugar that is naturally filtered through the kidneys, and the sugar is spilled in the urine. This causes people who have very high sugars to be very thirsty, and to have to urinate very frequently. Patients will often have sudden significant weight loss associated with these symptoms. These same patients will be so thirsty they will often drink sugary drinks (such as sodas, juices or sweetened coffee drinks) which causes the sugars to be even higher, and the weight loss to be more severe. It can become a sudden dangerous cycle. If you suddenly develop significant involuntary weight loss, especially associated with significant thirst or an increased need to urinate, it is critical to see a health care provider as soon as possible. Read more: Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It? Steps for Diagnosing Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes: Preventing High Blood Sugar Emergencies Continue reading >>

Tell Me About It: My Husband Hasn’t Been The Same Since His Diabetes Diagnosis

Tell Me About It: My Husband Hasn’t Been The Same Since His Diabetes Diagnosis

How can I get him to wake up and smell the roses instead of dragging us all down? Q After finally getting my husband to the GP with months of nagging, we found out he has Type 2 diabetes. I was relieved that we knew what was wrong at last. But he has gone off the deep end. He has developed an obsession with reversing it, is exercising like a fanatic and starving himself, is putting his faith in “miracle” cures that invariably disappoint, worries constantly about the unpleasant complications down the road and compulsively tells everyone who will listen about his diagnosis. I keep trying to reassure him, to get him to concentrate on the positives in his life. He has had no serious complications yet. He should enjoy our life as a family to the full for the few years we have left before the kids leave the nest. But the more I try to calm him down, the more obsessive he gets. He is on a constant binge of self-denial and martyrdom, and has completely sworn off drinking and eating his favourites. It really takes the fun out of celebrations for everyone else in the family. It doesn’t help that our family doctor doesn’t seem very clued-up on this disease. This causes a knowledge vacuum that my husband has rushed to fill with online quackery. Can you suggest some strategies to get him to “wake up and smell the roses” instead of dragging us all down into an unnecessary pit of despair? I want the easy-going and jolly man I married back. A Being diagnosed with diabetes is a life-altering challenge, especially because you are in control of your destiny to the degree that you can eliminate future complications by sticking to a healthy eating programme and avoiding being overweight. Some people go into denial and end up having amputations or kidney failure, so the plus with Continue reading >>

More in diabetes