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Signs Of Diabetes In Women

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Type 1 diabetes tends to start when people are under 25, although it can be diagnosed later in life. With Type 1 diabetes (also called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. When glucose can't enter the cells, it builds up in the blood and the body's cells literally starve to death. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections and regularly monitor their blood glucose levels. The cause of Type 1 diabetes is unknown but it is thought to be an autoimmune disease, where the body's immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Not all diabetes in children and teenagers is the kind called Type 1. Type 2 diabetes is being seen increasingly in young people. Where Type 1 diabetes always requires insulin, Type 2 can require insulin but often it can be treated with other medicines such as tablets. This section deals only with young people who have Type 1 diabetes. We have talked to a range of young people who've lived with Type 1 diabetes from those who were very young when they were first diagnosed to those who were diagnosed when they were teenagers. We have also talked to some young people only recently diagnosed. In this section young people talk about the signs and symptoms that prompted them to seek medical help. Signs of diabetes Most people remembered that the first symptoms of diabetes had crept up on them over weeks or even months- most had felt thirsty all the time and said that they started to drink more and more and found that they were unable to quench their thirst. Lots of people described realising something must be wrong wi Continue reading >>

8 Warnings Early Signs Of Diabetes In Men & Women You Should Know

8 Warnings Early Signs Of Diabetes In Men & Women You Should Know

Research says that only 18 million people show the signs of diabetes and are aware that they have it, of more than 24 million people who are affected by it. The fact which is even more disturbing is that about 90% of those people are suffering from type II diabetes. This is why it is also known by the name of the silent killer, as its symptoms are easy-to-miss. According to Doctor Maria Collazo-Clavell at Mayo Clinic, almost every day people visit her office with diabetes and are unaware of it. The best method to pick up on it is to undergo a thorough blood sugar test. There might be a few symptoms that are visible and from which you can indicate the presence of diabetes. Signs of Diabetes in Men and Women The early symptoms of diabetes type 2 in adults are usually seemingly harmless – that is even if the symptoms are there. But with the passage of time, these signs lead to other diabetic complications. So, we have compiled this short list of signs of diabetes, to help you in letting you know whether you have it or not. Excessive Thirst, Increased Urination The increase in thirst and urination levels are one of the primary symptoms, and in medical terms, they are known as the conditions of polydipsia and polyuria, respectively. As in diabetes, the sugar (glucose) level in the blood increases, the kidneys need to work harder to relieve the body of this extra glucose. The urge to urination is usually more frequent during the night time, as the human body is trying to relax. As the excretion of blood sugar also drags the essential fluids, the body is left dehydration which leads to excessive thirst. Consequently, due to a sudden increase in fluid levels, the need for urination grows even more. Doctor Collazo-Clavell say that both of these situations are how the human bod Continue reading >>

5 Strange Symptoms That Could Be Early Signs Of Diabetes

5 Strange Symptoms That Could Be Early Signs Of Diabetes

Besides the well-known symptoms—like constant thirst and a frequent need to pee—here are a few other subtle signals that something may be wrong. This article originally appeared on Health. Many people who develop type 2 diabetes have no idea they’re sick until a blood test shows abnormal blood sugar levels, or until their disease progresses and serious complications start to occur. “For the most part, diabetes is silent and insidious,” says Ronald Tamler, MD, director of the Mount Sinai Clinical Diabetes Institute. “Most of the time people have no symptoms early on.” In some cases, though, there are sneaky signs. Some early diabetes symptoms are well-known: constant thirst, excessive urination, or sudden weight gain or loss, for example. Others, like the ones below, are more easily missed—by medical professionals and patients alike. If you’re experiencing any of these, be sure to bring them up with your doctor. Inflamed or infected gums Periodontitis—also known as gum disease—may be an early sign of type 2 diabetes, according to new research published in the journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care. The study found that people with gum disease, especially those with severe cases, had higher rates of diabetes (both diagnosed and undiagnosed) and pre-diabetes than those without. The connection between gum disease and diabetes isn’t new, says Dr. Tamler, and it appears to go both ways: Having either condition seems to increase the risk of developing the other. “Inflammation caused by gum disease eggs on the same factors that are responsible for high blood sugar that cause diabetes,” he says. Subscribe to our daily newsletter for the latest in hair, beauty, style and celebrity news. Skin discoloration “Long before you actually get diabetes, yo Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Differs For Men And Women

How Diabetes Differs For Men And Women

Although anyone can develop type 2 diabetes, your lifestyle, age and family history can put you at a higher risk. Common signs of diabetes include weight loss or gain, increased thirst, frequent urination or urinary tract infections, tingling or numb extremities, and feeling lethargic all the time. Symptoms can develop gradually and can be somewhat difficult to notice; most people find out they are diabetic when they’re visiting the doctor for a different reason altogether. The Facts about Diabetes and Gender Recently, studies have revealed some differences in the impact of diabetes on women versus men. Statistics show that 11 percent of women in the United States age 20 and older have diabetes, a number just slightly less than men. One of the major differences is how the disease is diagnosed. The signs of diabetes in men tend to be more recognizable, making it easier for men to get diagnosed earlier. Men tend to develop type 2 diabetes at a younger age and at a lower weight, which means they receive more aggressive treatment sooner for both diabetes and the potential heart health risks it can bring. Women tend to be further along in the disease when they are diagnosed, making them far more susceptible to complications. Some of the ways diabetes symptoms in women have a greater impact on overall health include: Heart disease. Heart disease is the leading cause of death among women with diabetes. When a woman is diabetic, the risk for heart disease is six times higher than for women who do not have diabetes. Studies show that the risk of heart disease to women with diabetes is 50 percent higher than for men with diabetes. Hormonal problems. Women’s hormones can also affect the way they manage their diabetes; menopause can cause changes in blood sugar levels, and some Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Women

Diabetes Symptoms In Women

Some 11 percent of all women in the U.S. have diabetes. Symptoms in women are similar to those in men, but there are some differences. How do diabetes symptoms in women differ from diabetes symptoms in men? Monkey Business Images | Dreamstime.com The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that more than 13 million womenor roughly 11 percent of all women in the U.S.suffer from diabetes. What characterizes diabetes symptoms in women? A number of factors can come into play. First, lets answer the question What is diabetes? Diabetes is a condition characterized by elevated blood glucose levels . In people without diabetes, the pancreas produces the hormone insulin, which acts on the bodys cells, moving sugar or glucose from the blood into the cells where it can be used for energy. In type 1 diabetes, the bodys immune system attacks and destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, resulting in an insulin deficiency and, therefore, elevated blood glucose levels. In type 2 diabetes, the cells of the body become resistant to the effects of insulin and the pancreas cannot produce enough extra insulin to compensate for this resistance. The result: high blood glucose levels . Some women experience yet another type of diabetes during pregnancy called gestational diabetes. In gestational diabetes, hormones produced by the placenta cause the bodys cells to be resistant to insulin and, as in type 2 diabetes , when the pancreas cannot produce enough extra insulin, blood glucose levels rise. Risk factors for type 1 diabetes, primarily family history, the presence of autoantibodies, living in a colder climate, and possibly exposure to certain viral illnesses, are the same for men and women. While most risk factors for type 2 diabetes, which include obesit Continue reading >>

Symptoms In Women

Symptoms In Women

Diabetes is a common health condition among women all around the world and it is extremely essential to be aware of the diabetes symptoms. Below, you will be given complete information on the causes, symptoms and types of diabetes that affect women. Diabetes in Women Increases Diabetes is essentially a metabolic disorder that occurs as a result of elevated glucose levels in the blood. Although both women and men can be impacted by diabetes, the diabetes rate in women has considerably increased in recent years. Furthermore, studies have indicated that women are at more risk of becoming affected by the causes of diabetes in comparison to men. Therefore, more focus will be placed on being aware of the symptoms in women. Medically, this health condition is referred to as diabetes mellitus. Primarily, diabetes can be categorized into two types; they are Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 is also referred to as juvenile diabetes because it is seen commonly in young children, adults and teenagers typically in the age range of 25 to 30 years. This takes place when the pancreas is incapable of producing insulin, which has the responsibility to transport glucose to the cells of the body. When the body fails to produce an adequate amount of insulin; the level of glucose in the blood increases. That increase results in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes typically occurs in individuals who are middle-aged and older and are afflicted with obesity issues. Type 2 diabetes typically comes about because of poor eating habits and a sedentary lifestyle. In such a case, insulin is produced by the pancreas; however, the body becomes immune to the insulin. It is unable to properly use the insulin, resulting in glucose being present in the blood. Gestational diabetes is another type of diabetes which occurs in Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Complications

Gestational Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Complications

MORE Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that develops, or is first diagnosed, during pregnancy. The condition, like other forms of diabetes, involves high blood sugar levels. Often times, gestational diabetes is a temporary disorder that occurs around the second trimester of pregnancy, and disappears after a woman gives birth. "Even if a woman had required quite a bit of therapy and treatment to keep her blood sugars under control when she was pregnant … usually the day after delivery, [her] sugars go back down to normal," said Dr. Christopher Glantz, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. But women who've had gestational diabetes should be monitored closely after birth, because they are more likely to develop diabetes later in life, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). A 2014 study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that between 4 and 9 percent of pregnant women in the United States develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs more frequently among certain ethic groups, including African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, Asians, and Pacific Islanders according to the March of Dimes. Symptoms Women with gestational diabetes usually have no symptoms or mild, non-life-threatening symptoms, according to the NIH. These symptoms are mostly related to abnormal blood sugar levels, and can include fatigue, excessive thirst and increased urination. Causes During pregnancy, changes happen in the mother's body to make sugar more available to the fetus, Glantz said. One of these changes is that the placenta produces hormones that interfere with the action of insulin, a hormone that helps sugar (or glucose) get from the bloodstream into cells. This means that sugar i Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Gestational

Diabetes - Gestational

Gestational diabetes is diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. When the pregnancy is over, the diabetes usually disappears. Women who develop gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A healthy lifestyle is important for both mother and baby to reduce their risk of diabetes in the future. If you have had gestational diabetes before, in future pregnancies, a test will be performed early in the pregnancy to make check that your blood glucose levels are in the normal range On this page: Gestational diabetes is diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Diabetes is a common condition where there is too much glucose in the blood. Women usually recover from gestational diabetes after their baby is born, when their blood glucose levels return to normal. Our body makes insulin to help keep our blood glucose at the right level. Blood glucose becomes higher when we can’t make enough insulin or when it does not work as well as it should Development of gestational diabetes During pregnancy, hormones are made by the placenta to help the baby develop and grow. These hormones, however, stop the mother’s insulin from working properly. This is called insulin resistance. As the pregnancy develops and the baby grows bigger, the mother’s body has to make more insulin to keep her blood glucose at normal levels. Later in pregnancy the amount of insulin needed to keep blood glucose levels normal is two to three times higher than usual. If the body is unable to produce enough insulin to keep blood glucose levels in the normal range, gestational diabetes develops. Women at risk of gestational diabetes Between three and eight per cent of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes. It is usually detected around weeks 24 to 28 of pregnancy, although it can devel Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Getting Pregnant

Diabetes And Getting Pregnant

Having a chronic condition such as diabetes (diabetes mellitus) takes careful monitoring of your health at the best of times, and this becomes even more crucial during pregnancy, a time when your body changes dramatically. Most women who have pre-existing diabetes who become pregnant have type 1 diabetes (once called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes), although some may have type 2 (once called non-insulin dependent or maturity-onset) diabetes. Another type of diabetes called gestational diabetes is a temporary type of diabetes that occurs in pregnant women who have never had diabetes before and it usually goes away after the baby is born. This article deals only with pre-existing diabetes — also known as 'pre-gestational diabetes'. If you have diabetes, there’s no reason that you can’t have a healthy and successful pregnancy and deliver a healthy baby. What it does mean is that you will probably have to work closely with your doctor and other healthcare professionals to ensure you manage your diabetes well during your pregnancy. I have diabetes and want to become pregnant: what should I do? Seeing your doctor for pre-pregnancy planning is an important step in ensuring the best outcome for you and your baby. You have a pre-existing condition, so you can plan ahead and discuss with your doctor what you need to do before you become pregnant, and what you can do to manage your diabetes during pregnancy. For example, if you have diabetes, you have a slightly higher risk than other women of your baby: having a birth defect; being born prematurely; weighing too much or too little; having jaundice; or having dangerously low blood sugar levels after birth. You yourself have an increased risk of having a miscarriage or of developing high blood pressure during the preg Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Women

Diabetes Symptoms In Women

Tweet Women should be aware of the symptoms of gestational diabetes, a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy and diabetes resulting from PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome). If you notice the symptoms of diabetes, the NHS advises that you contact a GP as soon as possible. Treating diabetes early can help to prevent further health complications. What are the symptoms of diabetes that are specific to women? Women may experience the following symptoms: This is over and above the general symptoms of diabetes, which include the following: Thrush and yeast infections Vaginal thrush (vulvovaginal candidiasis) can be a symptom of diabetes as high blood sugar levels can cause glucose to be excreted via the urine. Glucose in the urine can create a fertile breeding ground for yeast infections. Symptoms of vaginal yeast infections include: Soreness and itching around the vagina Reddening of the skin A white curd like appearance on the skin White vaginal discharge Pain during intercourse Oral yeast infections can also occur as a symptom of diabetes. Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) can cause difficulties in sexual activity in the following ways: Lack of sex drive Difficulty with arousal and achieving orgasm Pain during intercourse (dyspareunia) High blood sugar levels over a period of time can lead to poor blood supply and/or nerve damage which can lead to problems with arousal and achieving orgasm. High blood sugar can also lead to a lack of natural lubrication in the vagina which can make sex difficult or painful. Psychological reasons can be an alternative reason for female sexual dysfunction. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a specific form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. The symptoms of gestational diabetes are the sam Continue reading >>

How 4 Women Went From Prediabetes To No Diabetes!

How 4 Women Went From Prediabetes To No Diabetes!

What if you were on the path to developing a potentially life-threatening disease—and didn't know it? According to a recent report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, that might be the case for more than one in three American adults who have prediabetes, a symptomless condition in which the blood sugar is elevated but not high enough to be defined as diabetes. Eventually, it can progress to type 2 diabetes, which increases your risk for heart disease and stroke, as well as vision problems, nerve damage and other problems. The good news: You can beat prediabetes and prevent it from morphing into type 2 diabetes by making simple lifestyle changes. Losing just 5 percent to 10 percent of your body weight (if you're overweight) and exercising more reduces your risk of developing diabetes by nearly 60 percent. Taking action is especially important for women, who have a 40 percent to 50 percent higher chance of developing heart disease after a diabetes diagnosis than men do, according to recent research. The following four women heeded early warning signs and made life-saving changes. 'My pregnancy put me at risk' Name: Carolyn Ketchum, 41 Residence: Wakefield, Mass. Risk Factor: Gestational diabetes Biggest temptation: bread Highest A1C (glycated hemoglobin): 5.8 Lost: 0 pounds (weight loss was not a factor) "I don't fit your usual profile of someone with diabetes, because I've always been slender and active. So I was surprised when I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes while pregnant with my third child. As soon as I got the news, I began watching my carbs and testing my blood sugar daily. After I had Maggie in 2009, my endocrinologist suggested I continue testing. Everything seemed within range, but two months later, I started to see my blood sug Continue reading >>

Diabetes Warning Signs

Diabetes Warning Signs

Because type 2 diabetes can lead to serious health complications, it's important to be aware of any diabetes warning signs and get tested for diabetes if you have any of these symptoms. Treating diabetes early can help prevent serious complications. We'll explain the various diabetes warning signs and also warning signs of specific diabetes problems. Discover why it's important to listen to your body and alert your doctor if you notice any new signs or problems. Sometimes type 2 diabetes can develop without any warnings signs. In fact, about a third of all people who have type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. That's why it's important to talk to your doctor about your risk for diabetes and determine if you should be tested. Common warnings signs of diabetes include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) If you have any of the above mentioned warnings signs of diabetes, give your doctor a call and schedule a diabetes test. With the right diabetes diet, regular exercise, and medications, if needed, you can manage type 2 diabetes and live an active, productive life. If you have symptoms of the following diabetes complications, it's important to seek immediate medical attention. Each brief discussion links to more in-depth information. As you'll learn in this health topic, hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when the level of sugar or glucose in the blood drops too low to fuel the body. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a condition that results from a variety of causes. Hypoglycemia is most commonly a complication of diabetes treatment (diabetic hypoglycemia). You can develop hypoglycemia by taking too much insulin or other diabetes medications or Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Can Mask The Symptoms Of A Heart Attack

How Diabetes Can Mask The Symptoms Of A Heart Attack

Weird, whispering symptoms are easy to overlook; how to prevent and recognize this risk for people with diabetes. In a new study of more than 9,000 people, silent heart attacks—with warning signs so quiet or so unusual that people didn’t seek medical help—were nearly as common as classic heart attacks with well-known symptoms like crushing chest pain. And they were almost as lethal in the long run, tripling the odds of dying during the 9-year study compared to people who didn’t have a heart attack of any kind. It’s a wake-up call for anyone at risk for heart disease, but heart experts say people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes should pay particular attention. “People with diabetes are at higher risk for silent heart attacks for several reasons,” says Om P. Ganda, M.D., medical director of the Lipid Clinic at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and an associate clinical professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. “High blood sugar can lead to autonomic nerve damage that reduces the ability to feel pain, including heart-attack pain. Your only symptom might be shortness of breath. And people with diabetes are already at two to three time’s higher risk for heart disease than people without diabetes, which also increases the chances for a silent heart attack.” In a 2013 British study of 5,102 people with type 2, heart tests showed that 16%— about one in six—had likely had silent heart attacks. People with type 1 diabetes may also be at higher-than-average risk, Dr. Ganda says, due to nerve damage and overall heart-disease risk. Lead researcher Elsayed Z. Soliman, M.D., MSc., M.S., director of the epidemiological cardiology research center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, says silent heart attacks are dangerou Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

The Risks of Treating Diabetes with Drugs Are FAR Worse than the Disease There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes arent aware of their circumstances, either. The latest diabetes statistics 1 echo an increase in diabetes cases, both diagnosed and undiagnosed. By some estimates, diabetes has increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years! At least 29 million Americans are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are prediabetic . Whats hidden behind this medical smokescreen is that type 2 diabetes is completely preventable. The cure lies in a true understanding of the underlying cause (which is impaired insulin and leptin sensitivity) and implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle adjustments that spell phenomenal benefits to your health. Also known as diabetes mellitus, type 1 diabetes is a chronic health condition traditionally characterized by elevated levels of glucose in your blood, often simply called high blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes dubbed juvenile onset diabetes is the relatively uncommon type, affecting only about 1 in 250 Americans. Occurring in individuals younger than age 20, it has no known cure. Whats most concerning about juvenile diabetes is that, these numbers have been going up steadily right along with type 2 diabetes: for non-Hispanic white youths ages Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Women Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Diabetes In Women Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Home Info Diabetes in Women Causes, Symptoms & Treatment Diabetes in Women Causes, Symptoms & Treatment Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that occurs either due to impaired insulin production or due to reduced responsiveness to insulin in body leading to abnormally high levels of glucose in the blood stream [1] . It is common disorder to affect both women and men. Gestational diabetes is a kind of diabetes which is exclusive to pregnant women. However, the occurrence of this disease is much rarer than that of Type I and Type II Diabetes. The exact causes of diabetes in women are still debated and it is difficult to find a conclusive answer as to what is the exact cause of diabetes. In women, diabetes mellitus is believed to be caused due to a number of factors which include: Various environmental factors which act as triggers to the condition Gestational diabetes may occur during pregnancy due to an improper balance of hormones or the body not effectively reacting to insulin. If left untreated, it can cause Type II Diabetes in both the mother and the child. Prediabetes, if left uncontrolled, can lead to the development of Type II Diabetes in the future There are a number of signs and symptoms of diabetes in women. Such symptoms include: Excessive urination, also known as polyuria is a common symptom of diabetes where the diabetic individual feels an urge to urinate several times in a day. This results in excreting in excess of 2.5 liters per day as the body tries to eliminate the excess glucose in the blood stream through urine. Increased thirst and dryness of the mouth is also quite common. This condition is also known as Polydipsia and it is induced due to loss of fluids from the body. The condition may even lead to dehydration if not fulfilled and this may eventually Continue reading >>

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