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Signs Of Diabetes In 2 Year Old

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (It Could Save a Life) By: Rachelle Stocum / Blog Parents of children with diabetes will hear this question asked a million times. And each time you tell your story the story gets shorter and shorter. You begin to leave out details. Details that may one day save another child’s life. I wrote this for a couple of reasons. The first reason was to document the details and help other families who are searching for answers to unexplained symptoms. The second reason was to really get my emotions off my chest, and reflect. December 30, 2016 is a day I will never forget. This date will now be forever know to us as Carter’s “dia-versary.” This was the day my seven year old son Carter was diagnosed with Type one Diabetes. I still tear up when I say or even write those words… my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. The week before Christmas my son Carter had so many complaints. He’s not a whiny kid by any means so this was unusual for him. He’s actually the most compliant child I know. When I ask him to do something he does it. So when he first complained of a stomach ache I thought he was coming down with the flu. It seems reasonable that a child would get sick in December. So I tried to wake him up but it was really hard. He was groggy and didn’t want to wake up. Once he was finally woke up I told him that I didn’t want him to eat anything until I was able to get grandma’s monitor and test his blood sugar. He drank some water but understood what I was asking of him. He didn’t complain or cry even though he was hungry. I knew that was bad because when I was pregnant with him I had gestational diabetes. My blood glucose only ran about 120 from what I can recall, and I knew normal was around Continue reading >>

Diabetes Or Just Normal Thirst?

Diabetes Or Just Normal Thirst?

Dr. Greene, my 2-year-old daughter drinks a lot during the day. It could be water, juice, milk, or whatever. I am concerned. Is this normal for kids to drink 5-8 bottles of liquid during the day? Or this is a sign of diabetes? Should I bring her in for a test? Are there any other signs I should be looking for? I am really concerned. Thank you. Irina Eilen – The Gap Dr. Greene’s Answer: Irina, just last week on Monday morning, I picked up the top chart from my inbox and began walking to Exam Room 1 (the Safari Room). Before opening the door, I paused to open the chart and glance at the nurse’s notes. I was about to meet a 7-year-old boy whose mother had brought him in because he had been drinking much more than usual for about 2 weeks — especially over the preceding weekend. Could it be diabetes? I stepped in the room and greeted the mother and son. They confirmed what had been written in the chart, adding that he had also been urinating much more than usual, and perhaps had lost some weight. As they spoke I could tell that the mom felt a little guilty about bringing him in unnecessarily, but at the same time she was worried that something might be seriously wrong. Parents often experience this dilemma. Whenever you are battling inside about whether to contact your doctor, do it. The boy’s clothes were indeed loose fitting, but he otherwise appeared healthy. We did a simple urine test in the office, and two minutes later found that he had a huge amount of sugar and ketones in his urine. He had diabetes. Even though the mom suspected the diagnosis, she was totally stunned. She couldn’t believe it was true. I sent them across the parking lot to the hospital lab for some bloodwork. His blood sugar level was 645 mg/dL! A fasting blood sugar over 126 mg/dL or a ra Continue reading >>

Diabetes Overview

Diabetes Overview

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are lifelong conditions. You can minimise the long-term risks and complications for your child. diabetes is a condition where the level of glucose (also known as sugar) in the blood is too high that's because the body is not using the glucose properly in type 1 diabetes, the main problem is that the insulin making cells in the pancreas are destroyed and not able to make enough insulin in type 2 diabetes, the main problem is that the body is not able to use the insulin effectively due to resistance to insulin both forms of diabetes are lifelong conditions - once diagnosed as having type 1 or type 2 diabetes, your child will always have it you can minimise the long term risks and complications for your child What is diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where the level of glucose (also known as sugar) in the blood is too high. That's because the body is not using the glucose properly. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to allow glucose from food to move from the blood into cells in the body where it can be used for fuel for energy. Insulin is produced by the pancreas. Diabetes occurs when the insulin making cells in the pancreas are unable to make enough insulin or when there is resistance to the effects of insulin. You might find it helpful to watch a Diabetes UK animation (8 minutes 44 seconds) about diabetes and the body. © Diabetes UK. This video has been reproduced from the Diabetes UK website with the kind permission of Diabetes UK, the charity for people in the UK with diabetes. What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? In type 1 diabetes, the main problem is that the insulin making cells in the pancreas are destroyed and not able to make enough insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the main problem is that the body is not able to u Continue reading >>

8 Red-flag Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children

8 Red-flag Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children

What is type 1 diabetes? iStock/Jovanmandic Type 1 diabetes (T1D), previously called juvenile diabetes, develops when the pancreas no longer produces insulin—a necessary hormone to allow the blood sugar (glucose) to pass into cells so that the cells can use it as energy. According to JDRF (formerly known as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation), approximately 40,000 new cases of type 1 diabetes occur each year. Type 1 diabetes accounts for five to 10 percent of all diabetes cases in the United States. While T1D can happen at any age, JDRF states it’s most commonly diagnosed somewhere between infancy and late 30s, with the peak age of diagnosis in the US around age 14. What’s it like to receive a type 1 diabetes diagnosis? iStock/Cathy Yeulet If you have a child who’s been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in his or her childhood, you’re not alone. Chicago mother Beth Bernstein recounts her first thoughts when she learned her 14-year-old daughter had recently developed this type 1 diabetes. “You have to be strong for your children,” Bernstein said. “What do we do? What’s our next steps? I was very linear in my thinking. To see my daughter in so much discomfort and pain...it was horrible.” For Bernstein’s daughter, type 1 diabetes symptoms came without warning. “We couldn’t have prevented this,” she said. “It literally came out of the blue. At first, I felt guilty this had happened to my child, but then I learned there’s nothing we did to cause this.” Knowing the signs of type 1 diabetes in children is critical to control the illness. A child exhibiting symptoms of type 1 diabetes may demonstrate the following: Excessive thirst iStock/Kerkez As the body struggles to maintain adequate fluid levels, a child becomes very thirsty to prevent Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes in children is a chronic disease that affects the way your child's body processes sugar (glucose). It's important to manage your child's diabetes because its long-term consequences can be disabling or even life-threatening. Type 2 diabetes is more commonly associated with adults. In fact, it used to be called adult-onset diabetes. But type 2 diabetes in children is on the rise, fueled largely by the obesity epidemic. There's plenty you can do to help manage or prevent type 2 diabetes in children. Encourage your child to eat healthy foods, get plenty of physical activity and maintain a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to control type 2 diabetes in children, oral medication or insulin treatment may be needed. Symptoms Type 2 diabetes in children may develop gradually. About 40 percent of children who have type 2 diabetes have no signs or symptoms and are diagnosed during routine physical exams. Other children might experience: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your child's bloodstream pulls fluid from tissues. As a result your child might be thirsty — and drink and urinate more than usual. Weight loss. Without the energy that sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. However, weight loss is less common in children with type 2 diabetes than in children with type 1 diabetes. Fatigue. Lack of sugar in your child's cells might make him or her tired and lethargic. Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. Your child might be unable to focus clearly. Slow-healing sores or frequent infections. Type 2 diabetes affects your child's ability to heal and resist infections. When to see a doctor See your child' Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

For decades, type 2 diabetes was considered an adults-only condition. In fact, type 2 diabetes was once called adult-onset diabetes. But what was once a disease mainly faced by adults is becoming more common in children. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects how the body metabolizes sugar (glucose). Over 5,000 people under the age of 20 were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 2008 and 2009. Until 10 years ago, type 2 diabetes accounted for less than 3% of all newly diagnosed diabetes cases in adolescents; it now comprises 45% of all such cases. It’s more common in those aged 10-19 and in non-Caucasian populations, including African Americans, Native Americans, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics. Being overweight is closely tied to the development of type 2 diabetes. Overweight children have an increased likelihood of insulin resistance. As the body struggles to regulate insulin, high blood sugar leads to a number of potentially serious health problems. In the past 30 years, obesity in children has doubled and obesity in adolescents has quadrupled, according to the CDC. Genetics may also play a role. For instance, the risk of type 2 diabetes increases if one parent or both parents has the condition. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes are not always easy to spot. In most cases, the disease develops gradually, making the symptoms hard to detect. Many people do not feel any symptoms. In other cases, children may not show any obvious signs. If you believe your child has diabetes, keep an eye out for these signs: Excessive fatigue: If your child seems extraordinarily tired or sleepy, their body may not have enough sugar to properly fuel their normal body functions. Excessive thirst: Children who have excessive thirst may have high blood sugar levels. Frequent Continue reading >>

Dealing With Diabetes At Age 2

Dealing With Diabetes At Age 2

MACOMB TOWNSHIP, Mich. - Toddlers are a funny bunch, always changing and developing new quirks. But when Janelle Dowdy noticed a strange symptom in her two-year-old daughter Elizabeth, she had a gut feeling something just wasn't right. "It started with her drinking a lot of water, and I thought it was really strange," said Dowdy. As a nurse, Dowdy knew that extreme thirst can be a symptom of diabetes. But when she raised the possibly with coworkers, they were reassuring. "They're like, 'Oh, two-year-olds get fascinated by water. Just kind of watch her,'" said Dowdy. "There's no family history of it. I was concerned, but then I kind of thought that maybe I'm just a paranoid mom." Elizabeth was also urinating a lot. "Then she'd ask me, 'Mama, I tired. It's nap time,' two hours after she'd wake up," said Dowdy. "And I told my husband, 'We need to take her to the doctor.'" They made an appointment, but the next day, Elizabeth began vomiting. Jacob Dowdy rushed his daughter to urgent care, where they tested her blood sugar. "The nurse was doing the test," said Jacob Dowdy. "As soon as I heard the beep, her face turned white and just ran right out and said, 'It's not good.'" A normal blood sugar level in a toddler is between 100 and 200. Elizabeth's was 857, critically high. Her parents reaction: "Panic. I knew that's not good, and that her life would change forever," said Janelle Dowdy. "I was in shock," said Jacob Dowdy. "I'm like, 'This is a dream.' I'm like pinching myself trying to wake up, because I never thought it would happen." Elizabeth was hospitalized and diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Type 1 occurs when a person's pancreas stops producing insulin. It's a diagnosis that three million Americans are living with, and it's not related to diet or lifestyle. Children a Continue reading >>

Diabetes In A Two-year-old Is Challenging – But There Was More To Come

Diabetes In A Two-year-old Is Challenging – But There Was More To Come

"I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in1983 at the age of four. I'd love to say my diabetes control was perfect throughout my years with the condition, but unfortunately I was a very trying teenager and young adult. Thankfully I have not yet had any long-term health problems other than diabetes. James I studied hard and trained to be a registered nurse, and met a wonderful partner who has supported me through all my highs and lows. In 2007 we discovered that I was pregnant with my first child, James. The diabetes team managed to get me funding to go on the Accu-Chek Spirit pump, which I started on during my second trimester. My blood glucose control became much tighter due to the pregnancy, and the pump made it much easier for me to control my diabetes. Once I had James I returned to work for a year and then became pregnant with my second child – they were both beautiful healthy children. We plodded along nicely for six months. In January 2010 James started to become thirsty and leaking through his nappy at night, and he became tired and grumpy. Any person with diabetes know those signs. I remember waking one morning (after a couple of weeks ignoring the symptoms) to the recognisable smell of ketones on James' breath! I unwillingly checked his blood sugar to find that pre-breakfast they were 17mmol/l; post-breakfast they were up to 24mmol/l. Obviously hospital came next and there started James' life on the Medtronic Veo pump. Thankfully I had noticed it early so he did not stay in hospital: he was home the same day. Well, diabetes in a two-year-old is much more challenging than it had been for me, but there was more to come! Elizabeth Three months later, in April 2010 I did a random blood sugar test on my 8½-month-old daughter Elizabeth to find that her sugars were Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Diabetes can affect individuals of any age, including infants and children. Knowing that your baby has diabetes can be really frightening. But by learning how to perform glucose testing and give insulin, you can help your child to grow up healthy. The first thing you need to do, though, is to keep your own stress level down. Your baby can sense if you feel anxious, so it is up to you to be as brave as your little one. Types Medical experts say that Type 1 diabetes is the form of the disease most often diagnosed in infants. More commonly known as juvenile onset diabetes, this autoimmune disorder prevents the body from producing enough insulin, a hormone needed so that cells can break down glucose for energy. Type 2, or non-insulin dependent diabetes, can also affect infants. Insulin resistance is the primary cause of Type 2 diabetes. As a result, both insulin and blood sugar levels in the body continue to rise. Certain medical conditions or genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, can cause this type of diabetes as well. Symptoms The American Academy of Pediatrics tells parents to contact their child’s pediatrician immediately if she shows any of the following symptoms. Crankiness, sweating, trembling, paleness and bluish tinge to the lips or fingers are symptoms that an infant might be hypoglycemic. A glucose test should be performed, as treatment may be needed if the infant’s blood sugar is too low. A baby’s brain development requires a continuous supply of glucose. Therefore, parents must carefully manage their child’s diabetes. Likewise, when an infant’s glucose levels climb too high, hyperglycemia means that your infant may not be getting enough insulin in combination with how much you are feeding her. While infants often display no sy Continue reading >>

Cat Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Cat Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Cat Diabetes is a fairly common condition of many cats. My clients are sometimes surprised to hear that a cat can develop diabetes. It comes down again to the fact that cats have almost all of the same organs we do and if they malfunction, our kitties develop the same diseases we do. Diabetes is a chronic illness that changes how carbohydrates are processed in your cat's body due to insulin resistance or a poor response to natural insulin. For those who don't know, insulin is needed to regulate glucose in your cat's bloodstream, which creates problems with a number of metabolic functions, as well as the kidneys, heart, skin, and eyes among other vital organs. After treating diabetic cats for over 20 years in my feline veterinary practice, I, for the first time, diagnosed diabetes in my own cat a few years ago. Index Symptoms of Cat Diabetes It's important to know the most frequent symptoms of feline diabetes because they are usually easy to recognize. It is important to catch them early and begin treatment early, as diabetes can be quite manageable and a diabetic cat can live a normal lifespan if treated quickly and effectively. (1) Increased Thirst (2) Increased Urination (3) An increased appetite in the beginning which may decrease over time if not diagnosed and treated (4) Weight loss, although diabetic cats often begin as overweight cats (5) As time goes on, lethargy, vomiting, and diarrhea may appear (6) If a cat is diabetic too long without diagnosis and treatment, you will begin to see a change in the back legs as he walks. Instead of walking up on his "toes" as cats do, his hocks will become lower to the ground and the cat will almost walk flat-footed. This is due to a condition called diabetic neuropathy and indicates the disease has been present for quite some Continue reading >>

'our Baby Has Diabetes'

'our Baby Has Diabetes'

(Parenting.com) -- Last winter our 11-month-old son Jake had the flu, we thought. My husband, Matt, and I had just gotten over it, and Jake was vomiting and acting lethargic. When he began to grunt with each breath, we took him to the emergency room -- expecting to hear that we were anxious parents. Instead, the nurse took his vitals and rushed to get the doctors. Doctors thought it was asthma, but asthma medicine didn't help. Jake was dehydrated and had gone into shock, so an IV was put into his leg and he was hooked up to a breathing machine. Everything was happening so fast. Minutes earlier, Jake was confused because I was crying; now he was fighting for his life. A terrible wait About an hour later, the doctors told us Jake had type I diabetes. We were stunned. I didn't know any adults with this disease, let alone a baby. Terrified, all I could think to ask was, "Will he be OK?" When they replied that they were doing everything they could, we realized how serious the situation was. He was moved to the intensive care unit -- strapped down, unconscious, connected to tubes. Over the next few days, there were more X-rays and blood tests, and Jake even stopped breathing once. But gradually the doctors regulated his sugar and blood acid levels with an insulin drip. I was worried that Jake wouldn't be the same little boy anymore; he cried when a doctor or nurse looked at him, and was uncharacteristically clingy. But he bounced back, and within a week, he was smiling and walking again. Intensive education Meanwhile, Matt and I got a crash course from the hospital's diabetes instructors in how to care for our son. It was overwhelming, but when Jake left after eight days we were prepared. Not that it's easy. We test his blood with a finger prick at least nine times a day, and Continue reading >>

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Children?

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Children?

Years ago, it was rare to hear about a child with type 2 diabetes. Doctors used to think kids only got type 1. It was even called juvenile diabetes for a long time. Not anymore. Now, according to the CDC, more than 208,000 people younger than 20 have this disease. That number includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Here's what you need to know if your child is diagnosed. You've probably heard diabetes and high blood sugar mentioned together. Here's what happens. Your digestive system breaks down carbohydrates into a type of sugar called glucose. Your pancreas creates a hormone, known as insulin, that moves glucose from your blood into your cells, where it’s used for fuel. In type 2 diabetes, the cells in your child's body don’t respond to the insulin, and glucose builds up in her bloodstream. This is called insulin resistance. Eventually, the sugar levels in her body get too high for it to handle. That could lead to other conditions in the future, like heart disease, blindness, and kidney failure. Type 2 diabetes is most likely to affect kids who are: Girls Overweight Have a family history of diabetes American Indian, African-American, Asian, or Hispanic/Latino Have a problem called insulin resistance The single biggest cause of type 2 diabetes in children is extra weight. In the U.S., nearly 1 out of every 3 children is overweight. Once a child gets too heavy, she’s twice as likely to get diabetes. One or more of these things may contribute to extra weight or obesity: Unhealthy eating Family members (alive or dead) who've been overweight Rarely, a hormone problem or other medical condition As with adults, type 2 diabetes is more likely to affect children who carry extra weight around the middle. At first, there may be no symptoms. Over time, you may notice: Hun Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes In Toddlers, Babies & Infants

Signs Of Diabetes In Toddlers, Babies & Infants

Type 1 diabetes is a serious autoimmune disease in which the pancreas stops producing insulin—which is essential to getting energy from food. It strikes suddenly—and has nothing to do with diet or lifestyle. Unfortunately, signs of diabetes in toddlers, babies and infants may not always be easy to pinpoint. That’s because it’s very hard—particularly in the case of infants and babies—for youngsters to let their parents know that something isn’t right. What to look for: Symptoms of pediatric diabetes in babies and toddlers You may or may not be aware that increased thirst and frequent urination are common symptoms of type 1 diabetes in toddlers and other young children. The reason this happens is rising blood-sugar levels trigger a reaction in the body that pulls fluid from tissues. This will leave your son or daughter constantly—and understandably—thirsty, which leads to increased urination. If your toddler is potty-trained you may also notice that they revert back or have bed-wetting issues. But what else should you watch out for? Below are some other potential signs of pediatric diabetes: Fatigue: This could be a sign that your child’s body isn’t able to turn the sugar in the bloodstream into energy. Intense hunger and unexplained weight loss: If your kid’s muscles and organs aren’t receiving enough energy, it can trigger extreme hunger. And sudden weight loss—especially if he or she is eating more—could also be a major warning sign. Changes in vision: High blood-glucose levels could lead to blurred vision or other eyesight issues. Unfortunately at a very young age, your son or daughter may not yet be able to articulate this. Yeast infection: This type of infection can be one of the signs of diabetes in babies—but it may present itself a Continue reading >>

Children And Diabetes

Children And Diabetes

Tweet Throughout the world, incidences of diabetes are on the rise, and consequently so is diabetes amongst children. Most children are affected by type 1 diabetes in childhood. However, the number of children and young adults affected by type 2 diabetes is beginning to rise, particularly in America. Approximately 90% of young people with diabetes suffer from type 1 and the number of patients who are children varies from place to place. A figure of 17 per 100,000 children developing diabetes each year has been reported. As metabolic syndrome, obesity and bad diets spread, so too have the first incidences of type 2 diabetes, previously incredibly rare. Further relevant pages Diabetes & pregnancy Juvenile diabetes Keeping your kids free from diabetes Teenage diabetes and blood glucose testing How is diabetes caused in children? The actual causes of the diabetic condition are little understood, in both children and adults. It is widely speculated that diabetes occurred when inherited genetic characteristics are triggered by environmental factors such as diet or exercise. Many type 1 diabetic children do not have diabetes in their families however, so the exact cause remains a mystery. Type 2 diabetes amongst children is usually caused by an extremely bad diet from a very young age, coupled with a sedentary lifestyle without exercise. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of Continue reading >>

Could Your Child Have Diabetes?

Could Your Child Have Diabetes?

More than 15,000 children are diagnosed with type 1 every year. Make sure you know the telltale signs -- they're all too easy to dismiss. When Chloe Powell started begging for one more drink of water every night, her father, Charles, thought his then 7-year-old was using a common bedtime stall tactic. "I was irritated that she wouldn't go to sleep," admits Dr. Powell, who's a family physician in Dallas. With all she was drinking, he wasn't surprised when she began wetting the bed. But when Chloe couldn't make it through a conversation without having to use the bathroom, he became concerned. "I figured she had a urinary-tract infection, and she'd take some antibiotics and feel better," says Dr. Powell. He wasn't at all prepared for what his daughter's urine test showed: a dangerously high level of sugar that was a clear indicator of type 1 diabetes. In an instant, Chloe, now 10, went from being a kid who never thought twice about the foods she ate or the energy she burned to one who'd face a lifetime of carbohydrate counting, finger pricks, and insulin injections. A Disease on the Rise Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that causes the body's immune system to mistakenly destroy healthy cells in the pancreas that produce the hormone insulin. (Type 2, on the other hand, occurs when the body doesn't respond to the insulin that's being made.) Insulin ensures that sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream gets into the body's cells where it's needed for energy; without insulin, sugar builds up in the blood, which can be deadly. It's important to begin insulin therapy as soon as possible because high blood-sugar levels can cause permanent vision and nerve problems as well as damage to blood vessels, increasing the risk of heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease. Since the 198 Continue reading >>

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