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Signs Of Diabetes In 2 Year Old

Could Your Child's Excessive Thirst Be A Diabetes Symptom?

Could Your Child's Excessive Thirst Be A Diabetes Symptom?

Could you child's excessive thirst, or other symptoms be a sign of diabetes? What are the symptoms you need to know as a parent and when should you call your pediatrician? Diabetes in Children Parents often worry about diabetes, but most are really concerned about type 1 diabetes—the kind that typically starts in childhood and requires treatment with insulin shots. Type I diabetes, however, is actually the least common type of diabetes, affecting only five percent of people with the disease. Type 2 diabetes, which used to be thought of as "adult-onset" diabetes, is much more common. In fact, with the increase in childhood obesity—a major risk factor for the disease—pediatricians now actively look for type 2 diabetes in teenagers and even preteens. Diabetes Symptoms in Children Many parents bring their children for an evaluation for diabetes because they have frequent urination and increased thirst. The only problem is that many children, especially toddlers and preschoolers will ask for and drink as much juice as you let them have, even if they aren't necessarily thirsty. And if they drink a lot of juice, they are going to have to urinate a lot. That's why kids who go to their pediatrician with just those symptoms usually don't end up having diabetes. This Symptoms of Diabetes quiz can help you determine whether a doctor visit could be necessary. Type I Diabetes Symptoms The symptoms of type 1 diabetes, which typically develop over a short period of time (days to weeks) often include: Frequent urination (polyuria) Being very thirsty or drinking a lot (polydipsia) The chances increase if you add other diabetes symptoms, such as: Eating a lot or extreme hunger (polyphagia) Unusual weight loss Extreme fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Weight loss is an especially i Continue reading >>

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (It Could Save a Life) By: Rachelle Stocum / Blog Parents of children with diabetes will hear this question asked a million times. And each time you tell your story the story gets shorter and shorter. You begin to leave out details. Details that may one day save another child’s life. I wrote this for a couple of reasons. The first reason was to document the details and help other families who are searching for answers to unexplained symptoms. The second reason was to really get my emotions off my chest, and reflect. December 30, 2016 is a day I will never forget. This date will now be forever know to us as Carter’s “dia-versary.” This was the day my seven year old son Carter was diagnosed with Type one Diabetes. I still tear up when I say or even write those words… my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. The week before Christmas my son Carter had so many complaints. He’s not a whiny kid by any means so this was unusual for him. He’s actually the most compliant child I know. When I ask him to do something he does it. So when he first complained of a stomach ache I thought he was coming down with the flu. It seems reasonable that a child would get sick in December. So I tried to wake him up but it was really hard. He was groggy and didn’t want to wake up. Once he was finally woke up I told him that I didn’t want him to eat anything until I was able to get grandma’s monitor and test his blood sugar. He drank some water but understood what I was asking of him. He didn’t complain or cry even though he was hungry. I knew that was bad because when I was pregnant with him I had gestational diabetes. My blood glucose only ran about 120 from what I can recall, and I knew normal was around Continue reading >>

8 Red-flag Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children

8 Red-flag Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children

What is type 1 diabetes? iStock/Jovanmandic Type 1 diabetes (T1D), previously called juvenile diabetes, develops when the pancreas no longer produces insulin—a necessary hormone to allow the blood sugar (glucose) to pass into cells so that the cells can use it as energy. According to JDRF (formerly known as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation), approximately 40,000 new cases of type 1 diabetes occur each year. Type 1 diabetes accounts for five to 10 percent of all diabetes cases in the United States. While T1D can happen at any age, JDRF states it’s most commonly diagnosed somewhere between infancy and late 30s, with the peak age of diagnosis in the US around age 14. What’s it like to receive a type 1 diabetes diagnosis? iStock/Cathy Yeulet If you have a child who’s been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in his or her childhood, you’re not alone. Chicago mother Beth Bernstein recounts her first thoughts when she learned her 14-year-old daughter had recently developed this type 1 diabetes. “You have to be strong for your children,” Bernstein said. “What do we do? What’s our next steps? I was very linear in my thinking. To see my daughter in so much discomfort and pain...it was horrible.” For Bernstein’s daughter, type 1 diabetes symptoms came without warning. “We couldn’t have prevented this,” she said. “It literally came out of the blue. At first, I felt guilty this had happened to my child, but then I learned there’s nothing we did to cause this.” Knowing the signs of type 1 diabetes in children is critical to control the illness. A child exhibiting symptoms of type 1 diabetes may demonstrate the following: Excessive thirst iStock/Kerkez As the body struggles to maintain adequate fluid levels, a child becomes very thirsty to prevent Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Diabetes can affect individuals of any age, including infants and children. Knowing that your baby has diabetes can be really frightening. But by learning how to perform glucose testing and give insulin, you can help your child to grow up healthy. The first thing you need to do, though, is to keep your own stress level down. Your baby can sense if you feel anxious, so it is up to you to be as brave as your little one. Types Medical experts say that Type 1 diabetes is the form of the disease most often diagnosed in infants. More commonly known as juvenile onset diabetes, this autoimmune disorder prevents the body from producing enough insulin, a hormone needed so that cells can break down glucose for energy. Type 2, or non-insulin dependent diabetes, can also affect infants. Insulin resistance is the primary cause of Type 2 diabetes. As a result, both insulin and blood sugar levels in the body continue to rise. Certain medical conditions or genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, can cause this type of diabetes as well. Symptoms The American Academy of Pediatrics tells parents to contact their child’s pediatrician immediately if she shows any of the following symptoms. Crankiness, sweating, trembling, paleness and bluish tinge to the lips or fingers are symptoms that an infant might be hypoglycemic. A glucose test should be performed, as treatment may be needed if the infant’s blood sugar is too low. A baby’s brain development requires a continuous supply of glucose. Therefore, parents must carefully manage their child’s diabetes. Likewise, when an infant’s glucose levels climb too high, hyperglycemia means that your infant may not be getting enough insulin in combination with how much you are feeding her. While infants often display no sy Continue reading >>

Cat Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Cat Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Cat Diabetes is a fairly common condition of many cats. My clients are sometimes surprised to hear that a cat can develop diabetes. It comes down again to the fact that cats have almost all of the same organs we do and if they malfunction, our kitties develop the same diseases we do. Diabetes is a chronic illness that changes how carbohydrates are processed in your cat's body due to insulin resistance or a poor response to natural insulin. For those who don't know, insulin is needed to regulate glucose in your cat's bloodstream, which creates problems with a number of metabolic functions, as well as the kidneys, heart, skin, and eyes among other vital organs. After treating diabetic cats for over 20 years in my feline veterinary practice, I, for the first time, diagnosed diabetes in my own cat a few years ago. Index Symptoms of Cat Diabetes It's important to know the most frequent symptoms of feline diabetes because they are usually easy to recognize. It is important to catch them early and begin treatment early, as diabetes can be quite manageable and a diabetic cat can live a normal lifespan if treated quickly and effectively. (1) Increased Thirst (2) Increased Urination (3) An increased appetite in the beginning which may decrease over time if not diagnosed and treated (4) Weight loss, although diabetic cats often begin as overweight cats (5) As time goes on, lethargy, vomiting, and diarrhea may appear (6) If a cat is diabetic too long without diagnosis and treatment, you will begin to see a change in the back legs as he walks. Instead of walking up on his "toes" as cats do, his hocks will become lower to the ground and the cat will almost walk flat-footed. This is due to a condition called diabetic neuropathy and indicates the disease has been present for quite some Continue reading >>

6 Telltale Diabetes Symptoms In Children

6 Telltale Diabetes Symptoms In Children

Diabetes is often thought of as an adult disease, as it can be caused by diet and lifestyle choices (eating habits and alcohol consumption). However, a 3-year old in the U.S. was recently diagnosed as one of the youngest ever to be diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes (Adult Onset), while children can be struck early with the inability to produce the hormone that helps process sugars (Type 1 or Juvenile Diabetes). A child with diabetes can be fatal if you’re not aware of the signs and they aren’t given the treatment they need. It’s important to know the signs so you can act quickly act, so here are 6 signals that your child may be battling the disease, which can be present in both types of diabetes… 1. Frequent Urination It can be hard to tell if your toddler is urinating more than often, but if you notice your youngster wetting their shorts (or bed) more often or complaining about needing to use the bathroom more, it could be a cause for concern. KindsHealth.org notes that more frequent urination is caused by the response of your child’s kidneys to higher levels of glucose (sugars) that aren’t being broken down to be used by their body. The kidneys are attempting to flush out the excess unprocessed sugars through the urine. 2. Excessive Thirst The increase of urination will undoubtedly cause an increase in thirst as your child’s body attempts to stay hydrated. It’s not just getting thirstier at intervals—the thirst can be continuous, according to experts. The urge to drink fluids all the time also creates more need to urinate, so it can become obvious as a cycle perpetuates itself, notes the Mayo Clinic. If your child is always whining for another glass of juice or water, it may be more than their love of those drinks—it could be they’re trying to quenc Continue reading >>

Diabetes Or Just Normal Thirst?

Diabetes Or Just Normal Thirst?

Dr. Greene, my 2-year-old daughter drinks a lot during the day. It could be water, juice, milk, or whatever. I am concerned. Is this normal for kids to drink 5-8 bottles of liquid during the day? Or this is a sign of diabetes? Should I bring her in for a test? Are there any other signs I should be looking for? I am really concerned. Thank you. Irina Eilen – The Gap Dr. Greene’s Answer: Irina, just last week on Monday morning, I picked up the top chart from my inbox and began walking to Exam Room 1 (the Safari Room). Before opening the door, I paused to open the chart and glance at the nurse’s notes. I was about to meet a 7-year-old boy whose mother had brought him in because he had been drinking much more than usual for about 2 weeks — especially over the preceding weekend. Could it be diabetes? I stepped in the room and greeted the mother and son. They confirmed what had been written in the chart, adding that he had also been urinating much more than usual, and perhaps had lost some weight. As they spoke I could tell that the mom felt a little guilty about bringing him in unnecessarily, but at the same time she was worried that something might be seriously wrong. Parents often experience this dilemma. Whenever you are battling inside about whether to contact your doctor, do it. The boy’s clothes were indeed loose fitting, but he otherwise appeared healthy. We did a simple urine test in the office, and two minutes later found that he had a huge amount of sugar and ketones in his urine. He had diabetes. Even though the mom suspected the diagnosis, she was totally stunned. She couldn’t believe it was true. I sent them across the parking lot to the hospital lab for some bloodwork. His blood sugar level was 645 mg/dL! A fasting blood sugar over 126 mg/dL or a ra Continue reading >>

When 'normal Teen' Stuff Is A Warning Sign Of Illness: What Parents Should Know

When 'normal Teen' Stuff Is A Warning Sign Of Illness: What Parents Should Know

Editor's Note: This story was first published on August 15, 2016. Stacey Crescitelli is parenting her third teenager after successfully steering daughters Anna, 19, and Sophia, 18, to adulthood. So when her third child, Henry, now 14, began growing at at a fast pace, sleeping more and thinning out, she and her husband Joe thought he was just being a typical teen. As it turns out, his body was actually fighting something more sinister than teenage hormones: Type 1 diabetes. Now, Crescitelli wants other parents of teenagers to know about the symptoms of Type 1 diabetes. But how can parents tell the difference between what is normal and what is not when it comes to teens? Stacey Crescitelli Never miss a parenting story with TODAY’s newsletters! Sign up here Crescitelli, 46, noticed that since December, Henry had grown a lot, "maybe four or five inches," she told TODAY Parents, "and his body was changing. He has always been kind of a solid boy with a large frame — never one of those reed thin, gangly boys — but suddenly, he was becoming one," she said, "and of course, we thought he was simply 'leaning out,'" she said. Though Henry continued to lose weight and began to sleep more, it was not until this past March that the Doylestown, Pennsylvania, mother noticed symptoms that did not fit with what she believed was normal for teenage boys. That was when Henry suffered from a sudden bout of vertigo that "terrified him and mystified us," said Crescitelli. Related story: State legislator riles up 'army of fierce moms' with diabetes comment "One minute he was in the kitchen getting water, and the next he was asking me to help him to the couch because he couldn't walk or focus his eyes," she said. The vertigo lasted for a day, but it was the beginning of more new symptoms: f Continue reading >>

My 2 Year Old Cat Was Just Diagnosed With Diabetes

My 2 Year Old Cat Was Just Diagnosed With Diabetes

by Laureen (Hawthorne, NY USA) Hi Dr. Neely, I went to the vet yesterday with my 2 year old male cat Smokey because, in a matter of 2 days, he seemed to get lethargic and was sleeping a lot. He had a fever of 103.7. The vet gave me feline antibiotics and did blood work on him. The veterinarian called today and told me that my cat has feline diabetes and has to eat special food (that he sells) and that I will have to learn to give my cat insulin injections. (Once again, he sells everything to me.) I asked my veterinarian, since my cat is overweight (15 - 16 lbs), whether I can try a dietary change first. These are the numbers that were high on my cat’s blood work and urinalysis: Glucose 244, CPK 1,377, WBC 18.0, MCHC 38.2, Neutrophils 84, Absolute Neutrophils 15,120 Urinalysis: Specific gravity 1.070, Protein 2+, Glucose 3+. Can his numbers be elevated for feline diabetes because he has an underlying infection? Can I try a dietary change first before giving him injections? He did not have excessive thirst or any other symptoms other than being overweight, which I contribute to his appetite. Please help if you can. I don't know what to do in this situation. I feel as if the veterinarian is rushing me into the insulin shots. Thank you, Laureen Dear Laureen, I have often seen blood glucose readings in that range simply from stress. Cats can become quite stressed from the trip to the veterinarian, from other animals in the hospital, and even from the process of drawing blood. However, many of those cats in this range will go on to become diabetic. Especially in a cat that is overweight, as yours is, this can be an early warning sign for feline diabetes. I detect a bit of suspicion in the tone of your letter when you mention that your veterinarian sells the prescription die Continue reading >>

Diabetes In A Two-year-old Is Challenging – But There Was More To Come

Diabetes In A Two-year-old Is Challenging – But There Was More To Come

"I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in1983 at the age of four. I'd love to say my diabetes control was perfect throughout my years with the condition, but unfortunately I was a very trying teenager and young adult. Thankfully I have not yet had any long-term health problems other than diabetes. James I studied hard and trained to be a registered nurse, and met a wonderful partner who has supported me through all my highs and lows. In 2007 we discovered that I was pregnant with my first child, James. The diabetes team managed to get me funding to go on the Accu-Chek Spirit pump, which I started on during my second trimester. My blood glucose control became much tighter due to the pregnancy, and the pump made it much easier for me to control my diabetes. Once I had James I returned to work for a year and then became pregnant with my second child – they were both beautiful healthy children. We plodded along nicely for six months. In January 2010 James started to become thirsty and leaking through his nappy at night, and he became tired and grumpy. Any person with diabetes know those signs. I remember waking one morning (after a couple of weeks ignoring the symptoms) to the recognisable smell of ketones on James' breath! I unwillingly checked his blood sugar to find that pre-breakfast they were 17mmol/l; post-breakfast they were up to 24mmol/l. Obviously hospital came next and there started James' life on the Medtronic Veo pump. Thankfully I had noticed it early so he did not stay in hospital: he was home the same day. Well, diabetes in a two-year-old is much more challenging than it had been for me, but there was more to come! Elizabeth Three months later, in April 2010 I did a random blood sugar test on my 8½-month-old daughter Elizabeth to find that her sugars were Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes in children is a chronic disease that affects the way your child's body processes sugar (glucose). It's important to manage your child's diabetes because its long-term consequences can be disabling or even life-threatening. Type 2 diabetes is more commonly associated with adults. In fact, it used to be called adult-onset diabetes. But type 2 diabetes in children is on the rise, fueled largely by the obesity epidemic. There's plenty you can do to help manage or prevent type 2 diabetes in children. Encourage your child to eat healthy foods, get plenty of physical activity and maintain a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to control type 2 diabetes in children, oral medication or insulin treatment may be needed. Symptoms Type 2 diabetes in children may develop gradually. About 40 percent of children who have type 2 diabetes have no signs or symptoms and are diagnosed during routine physical exams. Other children might experience: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your child's bloodstream pulls fluid from tissues. As a result your child might be thirsty — and drink and urinate more than usual. Weight loss. Without the energy that sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. However, weight loss is less common in children with type 2 diabetes than in children with type 1 diabetes. Fatigue. Lack of sugar in your child's cells might make him or her tired and lethargic. Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. Your child might be unable to focus clearly. Slow-healing sores or frequent infections. Type 2 diabetes affects your child's ability to heal and resist infections. When to see a doctor See your child' Continue reading >>

The Infant And Toddler With Diabetes: Challenges Of Diagnosis And Management

The Infant And Toddler With Diabetes: Challenges Of Diagnosis And Management

Go to: Infants and toddlers comprise a small minority of individuals with type 1 diabetes. However, epidemiological data provide evidence of a trend towards diagnosis at a younger age. These very young children pose significant challenges to both the health care professionals involved in their care as well as to their families. At diagnosis, younger children often do not present with classical symptoms of diabetes. Unless health professionals remain alert to the possibility of diabetes being the underlying cause of a child’s illness, the diagnosis may be missed. Once the diabetes has been diagnosed, the major challenge is to set up a treatment regimen that is both reasonable and realistic; in the youngest children, the goal of very tight metabolic control may expose them to episodes of severe hypoglycemia which may lead to subtle cognitive impairments later in life. The therapeutic regimen must balance the naturally erratic eating and exercise patterns of very young children with the need to maintain adequate metabolic control. Setting a blood glucose target range of 6 to 12 mmol/L usually allows this to be accomplished. Diabetes during early childhood creates a psychosocial challenge to the families of these children. Successful management of infants and toddlers with diabetes depends on a well functioning and educated family, the availability of diabetes health care team experienced in the treatment of these youngsters, and the involvement of the extended family, child care personnel and others who play a role in their daily care. Keywords: Infants, Metabolic control, Toddlers, Type I diabetes Children under three to five years of age with type I diabetes comprise a small proportion of all those with this disorder: less than 1% of all children are diagnosed in the f Continue reading >>

Signs & Symptoms

Signs & Symptoms

Early Detection It is important to know the signs and symptoms of diabetes to detect the disease early and get it under control before any irreversible damage is done to the body. Recent studies indicate that early detection and treatment of diabetes can decrease the chance of developing complications from the disease. Diabetes has often been referred to as a "silent disease" for two reasons: 1) Many people with Type 2 diabetes walk around with symptoms for many years, but are not diagnosed until they develop a complication of the disease, such as blindness, kidney disease, or heart disease; 2) There are no specific physical manifestations in individuals with diabetes. Therefore, unless a person chooses to disclose their disease, it is possible that friends and even family members may be unaware of a person's diagnosis. Diabetes is detected through a blood glucose test, and experts recommend that Americans over age 35 with a family history of diabetes or other risk factors (such as being overweight) should consider asking their physicians for a blood test annually. The earlier diabetes is detected, the earlier complications may be treated and/or prevented. Common signs/symptoms (for Type 1, Type 2, Type 1.5, Pre-diabetes, Gestational Diabetes) Unexplained weight loss is one of the common type 1 diabetes symptoms in women. With this type of diabetes, the body is unable to use all the calories that the food provides, even though the person follows a healthy diet. Due to this, the person loses weight, even without trying to do so. Another symptom that is seen in both types of diabetes is the feeling the need to visit the washroom frequently. The body tries to get rid of the excess sugar through the urine and hence, one feels the need to urinate within very short periods of Continue reading >>

'our Baby Has Diabetes'

'our Baby Has Diabetes'

(Parenting.com) -- Last winter our 11-month-old son Jake had the flu, we thought. My husband, Matt, and I had just gotten over it, and Jake was vomiting and acting lethargic. When he began to grunt with each breath, we took him to the emergency room -- expecting to hear that we were anxious parents. Instead, the nurse took his vitals and rushed to get the doctors. Doctors thought it was asthma, but asthma medicine didn't help. Jake was dehydrated and had gone into shock, so an IV was put into his leg and he was hooked up to a breathing machine. Everything was happening so fast. Minutes earlier, Jake was confused because I was crying; now he was fighting for his life. A terrible wait About an hour later, the doctors told us Jake had type I diabetes. We were stunned. I didn't know any adults with this disease, let alone a baby. Terrified, all I could think to ask was, "Will he be OK?" When they replied that they were doing everything they could, we realized how serious the situation was. He was moved to the intensive care unit -- strapped down, unconscious, connected to tubes. Over the next few days, there were more X-rays and blood tests, and Jake even stopped breathing once. But gradually the doctors regulated his sugar and blood acid levels with an insulin drip. I was worried that Jake wouldn't be the same little boy anymore; he cried when a doctor or nurse looked at him, and was uncharacteristically clingy. But he bounced back, and within a week, he was smiling and walking again. Intensive education Meanwhile, Matt and I got a crash course from the hospital's diabetes instructors in how to care for our son. It was overwhelming, but when Jake left after eight days we were prepared. Not that it's easy. We test his blood with a finger prick at least nine times a day, and Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Low Blood Sugar | Symptoms And Causes

Hypoglycemia And Low Blood Sugar | Symptoms And Causes

What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? While each child may experience symptoms of hypoglycemia differently, the most common include: shakiness dizziness sweating hunger headache irritability pale skin color sudden moodiness or behavior changes, such as crying for no apparent reason clumsy or jerky movements difficulty paying attention or confusion What causes hypoglycemia? The vast majority of episodes of hypoglycemia in children and adolescents occur when a child with diabetes takes too much insulin, eats too little, or exercises strenuously or for a prolonged period of time. For young children who do not have diabetes, hypoglycemia may be caused by: Single episodes: Stomach flu, or another illness that may cause them to not eat enough fasting for a prolonged period of time prolonged strenuous exercise and lack of food Recurrent episodes: accelerated starvation, also known as “ketotic hypoglycemia,” a tendency for children without diabetes, or any other known cause of hypoglycemia, to experience repeated hypoglycemic episodes. medications your child may be taking a congenital (present at birth) error in metabolism or unusual disorder such as hypopituitarism or hyperinsulinism. Continue reading >>

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