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Side Effects Of Diabetes Medication

Type 2 Diabetes: Medication Side Effects Stops A Third Of Patients From Taking Drugs

Type 2 Diabetes: Medication Side Effects Stops A Third Of Patients From Taking Drugs

Almost a third of diabetes patients aren’t taking their prescribed medication, metformin, due to its side effects, researchers have revealed. Metformin, the most commonly prescribed drug to treat type 2 diabetes, can lead to gastrointestinal side effects, including diarrhoea and flatulence, said scientists from the University of Surrey. The drug had the lowest level of patient compliance of all diabetes medication studied, with 30 per cent of diabetics choosing to not take their medication. Patients not taking their medication because of side effects should speak to their GP or nurse, to discuss changing to different drugs, they urged. “The importance of diabetes patients taking their prescribed medication cannot be underestimated,” said Clinical Researcher Dr Andy McGovern. “A failure to do so can lead to complications in their condition including eye disease and kidney damage. “Medication which is not taken does no good for the patient but still costs the NHS money, so this is an important issue. "We have known for a long time that a lot of medication prescribed for chronic diseases never actually get taken. What this latest research suggests is that patients find some of these medication classes much easier to take than others.” Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. The scientists compared patient adherence of the most common type 2 diabetes medication. While diabetes patients were most likely to avoid metformin, 23 per cent of sulfonylureas and 20 per cent of pioglitazone weren’t taken, the researchers claimed. A relatively newer type of drug, DPP4 inhibitors, had one of the highest level Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment: Medications For Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Treatment: Medications For Type 2 Diabetes

Healthy lifestyle choices — including diet, exercise and weight control — provide the foundation for managing type 2 diabetes. However, you may need medications to achieve target blood sugar (glucose) levels. Sometimes a single medication is effective. In other cases, a combination of medications works better. The list of medications for type 2 diabetes is long and potentially confusing. Learning about these drugs — how they're taken, what they do and what side effects they may cause — will help you discuss treatment options with your doctor. Diabetes treatment: Lowering blood sugar Several classes of type 2 diabetes medicines exist. Each class of medicine works in different ways to lower blood sugar. A drug may work by: Stimulating the pancreas to produce and release more insulin Inhibiting the production and release of glucose from the liver Blocking the action of stomach enzymes that break down carbohydrates Improving the sensitivity of cells to insulin Inhibiting the reabsorption of glucose in the kidneys Slowing how quickly food moves through the stomach Each class of medicine has one or more drugs. Some of these drugs are taken orally, while others must be injected. Compare diabetes medications Here's an at-a-glance comparison of common diabetes medications. More medications are available depending on your needs and situation. Ask your doctor about your options and the pros and cons of each. Oral medications Meglitinides Medications Repaglinide (Prandin) Nateglinide (Starlix) Action Stimulate the release of insulin Advantages Work quickly Possible side effects Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Weight gain Nausea or vomiting, when interacting with alcohol Sulfonylureas Medications Glipizide (Glucotrol) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase) Action S Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

The Risks Of Treating Diabetes With Drugs Are Far Worse Than The Disease

The Risks Of Treating Diabetes With Drugs Are Far Worse Than The Disease

Drugs in type 2 diabetics will nearly universally cause more damage than good Drugs used to lower blood sugar may increase your risk of death from all causes by 19 percent, and your risk of cardiovascular mortality by 43 percent You can prevent, treat and even reverse type 2 diabetes by making straightforward lifestyle changes By Dr. Mercola Nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes, and up to 95 percent of these cases are type 2 diabetes. Unlike type 1 diabetes, which is an autoimmune disease that shuts down your body's insulin production, type 2 diabetes is directly caused by lifestyle. Whereas type 1 diabetics need to inject insulin several times a day to stay alive, type 2 diabetics do NOT need drugs. In fact, taking drugs for type 2 diabetes can be far worse than the disease itself! Diabetes Drugs Increase Your Risk of Death Drugs are widely prescribed for type 2 diabetics to help lower blood sugar levels, but a new meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials involving more than 33,000 people showed that this treatment is not only ineffective, it's dangerous as well. Treatment with glucose-lowering drugs actually showed the potential to increase your risk of death from heart-related, and all other causes. "The overall results of this meta-analysis do not show a benefit of intensive glucose lowering treatment on all cause mortality or cardiovascular death. A 19% increase in all cause mortality and a 43% increase in cardiovascular mortality cannot be excluded." Lessons Learned from Avandia: Diabetes Drugs Can be Deadly Avandia (rosiglitazone) is the poster child for what is wrong with the drug treatment of type 2 diabetes. After hitting the market in 1999, a 2007 study in the New England Journal of Medicine linked it to a 43 percent increased risk of heart attac Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Many people using Januvia do not have serious side effects. Side effects that may occur with Januvia include: headache, joint or muscle pain, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, or constipation. Although Januvia by itself usually does not cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), low blood sugar may occur if Januvia is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Januvia including pancreatitis (severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate), urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, shortness of breath, or severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads [especially in the face or upper body] and causes blistering and peeling). The recommended dose of Januvia is 100 mg once daily. Januvia may interact with digoxin, probenecid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or beta-blockers. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. During pregnancy Januvia should be used only when prescribed. Pregnancy may cause or worsen diabetes. Your doctor may change your diabetes treatment during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Cons Continue reading >>

6 Diabetes Medication Mistakes To Avoid

6 Diabetes Medication Mistakes To Avoid

Treating type 2 diabetes can be tricky. Here are common mistakes that can prevent you from taking your medication as prescribed and tips for avoiding them. iStock.com If taking medication is part of your type 2 diabetes treatment plan, following your doctor's directions is essential. “It's important you take your medications on schedule because they have a timed-release,” says Toby Smithson, MS, RDN, LDN, CDE, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the co-author of Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies, and founder of DiabetesEveryDay.com. Your healthcare provider has calculated the dosage and scheduling to best manage your blood sugar levels and keep them within normal range. There's no single, exact formula when it comes to treating diabetes. But following your individualized course of diabetes medication makes it more likely to work as desired, says Matthew Corcoran, MD, CDE, ASCM, an endocrinologist in Egg Harbor, New Jersey, and founder of the Diabetes Training Camp at Franklin & Marshall College near Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Controlling type 2 diabetes through medication and lifestyle changes can help you avoid serious complications such as heart disease, blindness, and kidney and nerve damage, according to the Independent Diabetes Trust. Yet it can be easy to get off track with your diabetes treatment plan, especially if you're newly diagnosed and think of yourself as healthy, according to a study published in April 2015 in Diabetes Care. Here are common mistakes that may prevent you from sticking to your prescription routine and how you can avoid making them. Mistake #1: You don't realize the role of your medications. “It is important you understand how the medications you are taking work,” Dr. Corcoran says. You’re more l Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Diabetes Medications

Side Effects Of Diabetes Medications

Diabetes is a condition in which excess glucose is found in an individual’s blood. This can happen due to various reasons. Either enough insulin is not being produced in the body (Type 1 Diabetes) or the body is resistant to the insulin being produced (Type 2 Diabetes), often defective genes (Genetic) are responsible for this condition. Insulin is the hormone signalling cells to absorb glucose for later usage such as energy cosumption. So when there is an issue with respect to insulin, glucose is not taken up by the cells and it ends up getting accumulated in the bloodstream. This is when diabetes is diagnosed. Depending upon the condition, doctors prescribe either insulin doses or medication or both to the patient. As with most drugs, medications prescribed for diabetes have their side effects too. The most commonly prescribed medication is metformin, commonly known as glucophage which comes under the category of biguanides. It improves the body’s response to insulin, thereby improving glucose uptake. But the side effects of this drug cause stomach problems like pain, diarrhea, discomfort and decreased appetite. Sulphonylureas are the oldest class of drugs being given to diabetics. Their role, like others, is to reduce the amount of blood glucose in our body. But when the blood glucose becomes too low, it leads to a condition known as hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is a serious side effect of sulphonylureas besides weight gain. Other side effects include liver disease, reduced red blood cell count, skin rashes, etc. Thiazolidinediones or TZDs include medications with the name of Actos and Avandia. They make the muscle, liver and fat cells more sensitive to insulin. But they are prone to causing heart failure and bladder cancer. Other side effects include fatigue, muscl Continue reading >>

Managing Side Effects Of Oral Diabetes Medication – Weighing The Risks Vs. Benefits

Managing Side Effects Of Oral Diabetes Medication – Weighing The Risks Vs. Benefits

Medications to treat diabetes have a come a long way. From the standard insulin injections first discovered by 1923 Nobel Prize winners Frederick G. Banting and John Macleod in Toronto[1], there exists a spectrum of slow-acting and fast-acting insulin injections, in addition to oral medications and prescriptions to treat complications of diabetes such as heart disease. The oral medications that have been developed work in several different ways – alone or in combination with insulin injections and other drugs – to lower your glucose levels. While many of these oral prescriptions available for treating diabetes are helpful in keeping your blood glucose in better range, they also have the potential for some unpleasant side effects. As with any treatment that you seek to undergo or stop, it is crucial to weigh out the pros and cons of whether or not the medication side effects outweigh its benefits. This is a discussion best had with your medical care provider. Especially for people with Type 2 diabetes, oral medications offer a way to get effective treatment while avoiding or decreasing the amount of painful insulin jabs necessary. Many of the diabetes oral medications, like Glucotrol, work by stimulating the release of insulin, while other medications, like Metaformin, increase sensitivity to insulin and inhibit the release of glucose from the liver.[2] The side effects range from more common issues like nausea, diarrhea, weight gain, and headaches to more serious complications such as urinary tract infections, heart attack, and kidney failure. Other complications, such as bloating and gas, are not life-threatening but can be uncomfortable or at times a source of embarrassment. One member of an online diabetes forum nicked-named her Metformin “Metfartin” to put a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Oral Diabetes Medications Side Effects, Differences, And Effectiveness

Type 2 Oral Diabetes Medications Side Effects, Differences, And Effectiveness

What are the types of oral diabetes medications? Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. α-glucosidase inhibitors Biguanides Sulfonylureas Meglitinides Thiazolidinediones DPP-4 inhibitors Sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT)-2 inhibitors These medications differ in the way they function in the body to reduce blood glucose. Metformin (Glucophage) is the only biguanide available in the United States and is generally the first choice for oral treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin improves Sulfonylureas are the oldest classes of oral diabetes medications. Sulfonylureas work primarily by stimulating the release of insulin. Insulin is the hormone responsible for regulating blood glucose by increasing the uptake of blood glucose by tissues and increasing storage of glucose in the liver. Meglitinides and sulfonylureas have a similar mechanism of action. Meglitinides are short acting glucose lowering medications. They stimulate the secretion of insulin from the pancreas. Thiazolidinediones enhance insulin sensitivity meaning that the effect of a given amount of insulin is greater. Thiazolidinediones also are referred to as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? or PPAR-? agonists. α-glucosidase inhibitors delay the digestion and absorption of starch or carbohydrates by inhibiting enzymes in the small intestine which help breakdown these molecules. The starches and carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which then is absorbed from the intestine and increases the level in the blood. DPP-4 inhibitors help lower blood glucose by increasing the production of insulin from the pancreas and reducing the release of glucose from the liver. SGLT2 inhibitors or sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 in Continue reading >>

Considering Farxiga? Watch Our Television Commercial.

Considering Farxiga? Watch Our Television Commercial.

Your browser does not support the video tag. are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA What are the possible side effects of FARXIGA? Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive h Continue reading >>

Common Side Effects Of Diabetes Medications

Common Side Effects Of Diabetes Medications

Common Side Effects Of Diabetes Medications You, along with most people who have diabetes, probably take some form of medication to help manage the disease. But diabetes doesn't come in just one form, and the type of diabetes you have, as well as your unique symptoms and health profile, will ultimately dictate the types of medicines you'll need to take. Unfortunately, taking these drugs may cause a number of uncomfortable side effects. Here is a brief overview of the leading medications that are available for diabetes and their associated side effects. Remember, you may not experience these side effects. Insulin. If you have type 1 diabetes , you must take insulin to regulate your blood sugar. According to Diabetes.co.uk, there are no real side effects associated with taking insulin , but they do happen, mostly in the form of an allergic reaction. Should this occur, it's important to seek medical attention immediately. Increasingly, doctors are also prescribing insulin for people with type 2 diabetes. High blood pressure medications. Because diabetes increases the risk of cardiovascular problems , those with type 1 diabetes may also be prescribed beta blockers, angiotensin II receptor blockers, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. All of these are common drugs to help treat high blood pressure. Side effects vary depending on the medications, but typically someone taking these meds may experience slight dizziness, lightheadedness, and irregular heartbeats. Aspirin. This medication is often recommended by doctors to those with diabetes. The American Diabetes Association wrote that when taken in low doses, aspirin can help reduce the risk of heart attack in people with diabetes . Some of the more common side effects of this medication are nausea and an upset stoma Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

Check with your provider; usually taken once a day. Combines the actions of each pill used in the combination. Side effects are the same as those of each pill used in the combination. Some combinationpills may lead to low blood glucose levels if one of the medications contained in the combination has this effect. May decrease the number of pills you need to take. Other drugs are on the horizon as well, as scientists work to improve the variety of medications to treat type 2 diabetes. Frequently physicians will prescribe one type of oral medication and discover it isn't really helping to control blood glucose that much. In the past, this would have meant that the patient would likely be put on insulin. Now, physicians can try another type of medication to see if it helps correct problems. Physicians often notice that a particular medication works well for a period of time and then begins to work less well for a patient. Now they can mix and match medications that work on different aspects of the diabetes problem to see if that will improve blood glucose control. Continue reading >>

Do I Need To Change My Type 2 Diabetes Medication?

Do I Need To Change My Type 2 Diabetes Medication?

Type 2 diabetes medications offer many options to manage your blood sugar (also known as blood glucose). But if your current treatment isn’t getting the job done or doesn’t feel right for you, talk to your doctor. She may tell you it’s time to change your treatment plan. It’s important to keep your blood sugar within a healthy range. This lowers your chances of diabetes complications. If your readings are too high on your current medication, your doctor might want to change the dose or try another. This can happen even if your medication worked very well at first. Sometimes it just doesn’t do the trick by itself anymore. If one drug doesn’t manage your blood sugar well enough, your doctor might add a second. If two don’t work, she could add a third. Some diabetes medications can make your blood glucose go too low. Your doctor will call this hypoglycemia. It can be dangerous. You might see it with: Your blood sugar might also go too low if you take combination treatments that have these drugs in them: Talk to your doctor if you have low readings. You might need a lower dose or different medication. Some are temporary and should go away within a few weeks after you start the drug. Upset stomach, gas, or diarrhea can happen with: DPP-4 inhibitors like linagliptin (Tradjenta), saxagliptin (Onglyza), and sitagliptin (Januvia) GLP-1 agonists like albiglutide (Tanzeum), dulaglutide (Trulicity), exenatide (Byetta), exenatide extended release (Bydureon), and liraglutide (Saxenda, Victoza) You might have the same problem with treatments that combine these drugs. Talk to your doctor if your side effects are severe or don’t go away in a few weeks. Drugs called SGLT2-inhibitors -- canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Farxiga), and empagliflozin (Jardiance) -- hav Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication Side Effects

Diabetes Medication Side Effects

Tweet Many people with type 2 diabetes need diabetes drugs to manage their condition. Like all medication, there may be side effects, and this week we researched the Diabetes Forum to find out what the community is saying about type 2 diabetes medication and how it affects them. For this week, we have not included insulin, only diabetes medication taken or injected by type 2 diabetics. Type 2 Diabetes Drugs Diabetes drugs, alongside a healthy diet and exercise routine, help people with type 2 diabetes/gestational diabetes to maintain stable blood glucose levels. A variety of different diabetes drugs are available, with each performing a different function. Many people with diabetes have to take more than one type of pill, with some taking pills which combine two types of drug in one tablet. Some people experience a variety of side effects from different diabetes drugs. Got a question about diabetes medication and drugs? Try the Diabetes medication and drugs forum In the UK, doctors can prescribe many different diabetes drugs. Depending on how you react to the drugs you are prescribed, your doctor may change your prescription, change you to injections, or change you to insulin. If you are prescribed injections it generally means that you need this to reach your blood glucose targets. The diabetes drug that works best for you will depend on your individual circumstances, your body, diabetes care routine, diet and exercise, and any other health conditions that you face. Diabetes Drug Side Effects A side effect is an unwanted issue that is caused by a medicine. Some diabetes medication unfortunately includes common side effects such as nausea or an upset stomach. Your doctor will be able to advise you about specific side effects and the best ways possible to avoid them. No Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication

Diabetes Medication

There are different types of medications available for diabetes mellitus with each having their own mechanism of action and side effects. The best drug should be chosen by a doctor assessing the condition of the patient – please note all these are prescription medicines and need to be taken properly, under medical-supervision and with correct dosage and at the right timings. You must, at all times, follow instructions from your doctor. Never self-medicate. Basically, anti-diabetic drugs can be categorized into two classes: A. Oral anti-diabetic drugs: This includes the following classes: Insulin secretagogues: sulphonylureas and non-sulphonylureas(Glinides/Meglitinide) Biguanides Thiazolidinediones a-glucosidase inhibitors Di-peptydyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors/gliptins Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors B. Injectable anti-diabetic drugs: Insulin preparations Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) agonists According to A consensus statement of the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, a tier system is used to prescribe medicines depending on how validated (tested) the medication is. The tier is divided into steps depending on the stage of diabetes and how the patient responds to the lifestyle changes and medicines. Tier 1: This includes the best established, most-effective and most cost effective therapeutic strategies to control blood sugar. This is also the most preferred strategy for patients with type 2 diabetes. The tier is divided into 3 steps. Step 1: These are prescribed at when someone is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Apart from a lifestyle change, a mild medication that is well tested, has low and less severe side-effects and is cheap is prescribed. Step 2: A second medication is added when step 1 Continue reading >>

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