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Side Effects Metformin If Not Diabetic

Metformin Hcl

Metformin Hcl

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 1-3 times a day with meals. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Remember to use it at the same times each day. If you are already taking another diabetes drug (such as chlorpropamide), follow your doctor's directions carefully for stopping/continuing the old drug and starting metformin. Check your blood sugar regularly a Continue reading >>

6 Reasons Why Metformin Might Not Be Safe For Pcos

6 Reasons Why Metformin Might Not Be Safe For Pcos

Have you been prescribed metformin for PCOS and are wondering what the side affects are? Metformin is often described as a ‘safe’ drug, but read on to find out why this might not be the case. When I was diagnosed with PCOS, the first thing I asked my GP was what I could take to ‘fix’ it. She gently explained that there was no pill or surgery that could cure my condition. However, there was a drug that could help with the elevated insulin levels caused by it. Metformin, she claimed, was a safe drug with no major side effects that would help with insulin resistance and weight loss. Sign me up. At first, I thought metformin was the wonder drug. I lost about 5kg in 4 months, more than I had ever been able to lose previously. I was ecstatic. I had a quick look online to see whether there were any side effects and initially found that diarrhea, loose stools, fatigue, and muscle soreness were commonly experienced. But I thought that it was small price to pay for finally being able to lose some weight. However, when I investigated further I found that that there are some much more sinister side effects of metformin that aren’t so widely publicised. These include: – Depleting our bodies of essential nutrients. – Increasing the risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by up to 9 times. – Reducing energy levels by almost 50%. – Killing beneficial gut bacteria. This article is not intended to be a case against metformin for PCOS. There is no doubt that metformin helps to reduce weight, lowers blood glucose levels, and promotes ovulation. My concern is the lack of studies about the safety of long-term use of metformin for PCOS, especially in utero. Drugs can help with the associated symptoms of a disease, but they cannot fix the root cause of it. Metformin i Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

If you’re managing type 2 diabetes with metformin (Glucophage), you might be well acquainted with unwanted side effects of this drug — namely, upset stomach, diarrhea, muscle aches, and sleepiness. These can be a figurative and literal pain, but you might welcome one side effect of metformin with open arms, particularly if you’ve struggled to lose weight. Metformin isn’t a weight loss drug, but researchers have found a link between the drug and weight loss. In fact, a long-term study published in April 2012 in the journal Diabetes Care that was conducted by the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) concluded that the drug could serve as a treatment for excess body weight, although more studies are needed. What Is Metformin and How Does It Work? “[Metformin] has been considered a first-line medication in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and it mainly acts by lowering the amount of glucose released by the liver,” says Minisha Sood, MD, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “It also helps a hormone called insulin to work better by helping muscles use glucose in a more efficient manner. When insulin works better (and insulin sensitivity improves), a person’s insulin levels are lower than they would be otherwise.” There’s no cure for type 2 diabetes, but the right combination of medication and healthy lifestyle can stabilize blood sugar levels, which, of course, is the end goal of any diabetes treatment. As the medication helps your body properly metabolize food and restores your ability to respond to insulin, you’ll not only feel better, you can potentially avoid complications of high blood sugar, such as heart disease, kidney damage, nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), and eye damage (retinopathy). Why Does Metformin Cause Weight Lo Continue reading >>

Should Non-diabetics Use Diabetes Drugs?

Should Non-diabetics Use Diabetes Drugs?

A study involving over 180,000 people showed that patients treated with metformin can live longer than non-diabetics…. Craig Currie, professor at Cardiff University’s school of medicine said, "What we found was illuminating. Patients treated with metformin had a small but statistically significant improvement in survival compared with the cohort of non-diabetics, whereas those treated with sulfonylureas had a consistently reduced survival compared with non-diabetic patients. This was true even without any clever statistical manipulation." "Surprisingly," he adds, "the findings indicate that this cheap and widely prescribed diabetic drug may have beneficial effects not only on patients with diabetes but also for people without, and interestingly, people with type 1 diabetes. Metformin has been shown to have anti-cancer and anti-cardiovascular disease benefits. It can also reduce pre-diabetics’ chances of developing the disease by a third." "Their disease will progress and they will be typically switched to more aggressive treatments. People lose on average around eight years from their life expectancy after developing diabetes," Currie noted. The best way to avoid the condition altogether is by keeping moderately lean and taking some regular light exercise, he advised. The researchers compared all-cause mortality in diabetic patients treated with either sulfonylurea or metformin with matched individuals without diabetes including age, gender, same general practice, smoking status and clinical status criteria. A total of 78,241 subjects treated with metformin, 12,222 treated with sulphonylurea were identified, together with 90,463 subjects without diabetes who were matched to their respective cases. Practice Pearls: Metformin could increase the lifespan of those ind Continue reading >>

Metformin 850mg Tablets

Metformin 850mg Tablets

1. WHAT METFORMIN IS AND WHAT IT IS USED FOR The name of this medicine is Metformin 500mg or 850mg Tablets (called metformin in this leaflet). It belongs to a group of medicines called biguanides (a type of oral hypoglycaemic). Metformin is used for the sort of diabetes called Type 2 diabetes or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood. This is because your body does not make enough insulin or because it makes insulin that does not work properly. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body tissue to take glucose from the blood and use it for energy or for storage for future use. Metformin works by improving the sensitivity of your body to insulin. It helps your body to use glucose in the normal way again This medicine is given when diet and exercise alone has not been able to control your blood sugar levels. Metformin can be given on its own. However, sometimes it is given with other medicines for diabetes or with insulin. In patients who are overweight, long-term use of metformin also helps to lower the risk of any problems related to diabetes you are allergic (hypersensitive) to metformin or any of the other ingredients in this liquid (see section 6: Further information). An allergic reaction can include a rash, itching or shortness of breath. you have recently had a heart attack or any other heart problems you have severe circulation problems or difficulty in breathing you have had serious problems with your diabetes in the past called diabetic ketoacidosis. When you have this you lose weight quickly, feel sick (nausea) or are sick (vomiting). See also in Section 4: Possible side effects you have recently had a severe infection, injury or trauma (shock) you are going to have an X-ray where you will b Continue reading >>

'can I Take Metformin If I Want To Lose Weight?'

'can I Take Metformin If I Want To Lose Weight?'

Metformin is a drug designed to treat patients with Type 2 diabetes, but it comes with an interesting side effect: weight loss. And Reddit is filled with stories from people who have lost weight on the drug. “Was trying to lose weight for a long time with no success,” one person wrote of being prescribed metformin. “I’m on 1000 mg a day and am down 10 pounds.” “I saw weight loss at first with 500 mg twice per day,” another wrote. “The difference was almost immediate.” While some people say the drug didn’t do much for them, others swear by it—even those that don’t have Type 2 diabetes, says Fatima Cody Stanford, M.D., an instructor of medicine and pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and obesity medicine physician at Massachusetts General Hospital. In fact, Cody Stanford says that she often prescribes the medication to overweight or obese people who don't have Type 2 diabetes. Here’s what you need to know about the drug. (Hit the reset button—and burn fat like crazy with The Body Clock Diet!) How It Works Metformin causes a decrease in the release of glucose from a person’s liver. This helps to lower a person’s blood sugar when it’s too high and restore the way someone uses food to make energy, according to the Mayo Clinic. "Weight loss can occur because it decreases appetite in some people who take it," says women's health expert Jennifer Wider, M.D. In order for the prescription to work effectively, the amount of metformin you take must be balanced against your diet and exercise because it helps level out your blood sugar, the clinic says. For that reason, if you change your diet or exercise, you doctor may need to change the amount of metformin you take. Check out these moves that can help you light those calories up! Can It Help You Continue reading >>

The Drug Virtually Everyone Should Ask Their Doctor About

The Drug Virtually Everyone Should Ask Their Doctor About

With each passing year, fresh scientific evidence emerges to vindicate Life Extension®’s contention that aging humans can derive enormous benefit from an antidiabetic drug called metformin. In 2010 alone, scientists at top-ranked institutions made landmark discoveries that broaden its use to combat degenerative disease. The ability of metformin to help facilitate weight loss has long been known. What few doctors understand are the unique mechanisms by which metformin can prevent and even help treat certain cancers. In a remarkable finding, a team of Swiss researchers found that diabetic women on a long-term metformin regimen (5 years or more) experienced a 56% reduction in breast cancer risk!1 It also slashed pancreatic cancer rates by 62% in diabetics and may cut lung cancer rates in smokers.2,3 In this article, a novel link between impaired glucose control and cancer is detailed. You will discover the growing list of cancers metformin may effectively combat, including those of the colon, uterus, and prostate. You will also learn of a striking connection between the anti-cancer mechanisms of metformin and calorie restriction! Why Metformin Should Be Viewed Differently than Other Drugs Many Life Extension members like to brag that they do not need to take any prescription drugs. Given the lethal side effects posed by so many FDA-approved medications, avoiding them whenever possible makes sense. Metformin is an exception! Its broad-spectrum anti-aging properties make it a drug that most longevity enthusiasts should seriously consider asking their doctors about. Since it long ago came off patent, metformin is a super-low cost generic that everyone can afford. Metformin Was Originally a Botanical Compound Although it is sold as a prescription drug today, metformin has a Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Weight Loss With Metformin

Non-diabetic Weight Loss With Metformin

Metformin is a medication that normally is used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This medication is in the antihyperglyemic drug class, meaning that it counteracts glucose in the blood. While the Food and Drug Administration has not approved metformin for weight loss in the United States, some physicians are starting to utilize this medication in an off-label manner to decrease weight in overweight or obese patients. Several studies are underway analyzing the use of metformin for weight-loss, and more studies are needed before FDA approval. Video of the Day Decreased Hepatic Glucose Production Metformin decreases the amount of sugar that is created by the liver, according to findings from the Glaser Obesity Study, conducted by the Glaser Pediatric Research Network. If you haven't eaten in some period of time and your blood sugar becomes too low, your liver can compensate by creating and releasing sugar into the blood. Insulin is then secreted to compensate, and stores this sugar as fat in adipose tissue. When metformin decreases the amount of sugar released by the liver, the pancreas does not have to release extra insulin, thus reducing fat production and storage. Metformin may cause mild gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, according to Drugs.com. It is proposed that one possible mechanism of action for the weight-reducing benefit of metformin is simply that because of these mild gastrointestinal side effects people do not feel like eating, notes the Glaser research. If you have excessive or prolonged gastrointestinal upsets while taking metformin, contact your physician as he may need to change your medication. Metformin creates increased insulin sensitivity by assisting the body in using the blood sugar already present. Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

Metformin: New Benefits (and Risks) For This Old Diabetes Drug

Metformin: New Benefits (and Risks) For This Old Diabetes Drug

If type 2 diabetes is part of your life—whether you have the condition or are at risk of developing it—you’ve probably heard of a drug called metformin. Perhaps your doctor has told you about it, has recently started you on it or has been prescribing it to you for years to keep your blood sugar under control. It’s no newbie. Metformin has been available by prescription in the US for more than 20 years and in Europe for more than 40 years. US doctors write nearly 60 million prescriptions a year. It’s recommended as the go-to-first prescription for people with diabetes by the American Diabetes Association, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Physicians. Yet, in many ways, metformin remains a mystery. We know broadly but still not exactly, how it works. Even more surprising, new health benefits—and side effects—keep popping up. In fact, we’ve only recently learned that metformin might protect the heart, fight cancer and even boost longevity. On the other hand, it can, rarely, lead to a potentially fatal side effect, and it can even make a common diabetes complication worse. It’s time to take a closer look at metformin. MEDIEVAL FLOWER REMEDY, MODERN DRUG In medieval times, herbalists prescribed Galega officinalis—the bloom of the French lilac, also known as goat’s rue and Italian fitch—for patients with what we now recognize as diabetes. In the 1950s, medical researchers identified a compound in the lilac, metformin, that appeared to reliably and safely reduce high blood sugar. Metformin became widely available in Europe in the 1970s and was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1995 to treat type 2 diabetes. Some combination prescriptions include metformin with other prescription medication Continue reading >>

Effect Of Metformin On Different Non-diabetes Related Conditions, A Special Focus On Malignant Conditions: Review Of Literature

Effect Of Metformin On Different Non-diabetes Related Conditions, A Special Focus On Malignant Conditions: Review Of Literature

Go to: Metformin is one of the most commonly used diabetes treating agents [1]. It has proved to be very effective, with a wide spectrum of efficacy, safety, as well as being an agent that works at different spots in diabetes pathogenesis paradigm [1]. Metformin is now being used for over 60 years in many parts of the world. During these six decades, plenty of data showed beneficial effects of metformin apart from diabetes. Many diabetes associated conditions, like polycystic ovary disease and fatty liver disease, showed remarkable improvement upon using metformin [2, 3]. Data showed a protective effect of metformin in reducing cardiovascular complications, not only in diabetes patients but even those with a prediabetes state on the long term [4-6]. Moreover, metformin showed a beneficial effect in some studies in reducing the prevalence of different malignant conditions, and it helped in treating some of them when concomitantly used with other agents. From an endocrine perspective, some studies pointed towards the effect of the metformin on the thyroid function test, even in euthyroid patients. Nonetheless, metformin reduced the size of the thyroid nodule in some small papers in the literature. In this review, we shall highlight the systemic effects of metformin. We will focus mainly on the non-diabetes-related effects. Reviewed literature included randomized controlled trials, observational trials, and review articles. We have reviewed papers with the primary objective of assessing the non-diabetes related health issues. We have classified the results according to the area of metformin effect. These areas included the effect on inflammation modulation, weight reduction, and thyroid diseases and so on. In the cancer section, since it is the most studied area with metfo Continue reading >>

Is Metformin A Modern Miracle Medicine?

Is Metformin A Modern Miracle Medicine?

One of the most interesting drugs on pharmacy shelves is an old diabetes medication called metformin (Glucophage). Where It Came From In medieval Europe, healers used French lilac (Galega officinalis) to treat a range of symptoms, including some that might have been caused by type 2 diabetes. By the 17th century doctors were beginning to recognize diabetes and treat it with extracts of this plant. Metformin was synthesized from compounds derived from French lilac in the 1920s. The drug was found to lower blood sugar in rabbits. Around the same time, however, physicians developed a way to use insulin to treat diabetes, and metformin languished for several decades. In 1957, metformin was being used to treat type 2 diabetes in France. Its brand name, Glucophage, means glucose eater. It took until 1994 for the FDA to approve its use for type 2 diabetes in the US. It may now be the most widely used diabetes drug in the world. Diabetes Drug Against Cancer The story doesn’t end there, however. This inexpensive generic drug is getting attention because of other possible health benefits. The most exciting new discoveries have to do with metformin’s anticancer potential. Preliminary research has shown that metformin may reduce the risk of some cancers or prevent their spread. There is evidence that metformin lowers the risk of breast or pancreatic cancers, perhaps by tamping down the activity of cancer stem cells (Annals of Translational Medicine, June, 2014). A large epidemiological study of more than one million people demonstrated that the drug lowers the chance of thyroid cancer in people with type 2 diabetes (PLoS One, Oct. 10, 2014). It may also have a positive impact on prostate cancer. In one study, prostate cancer cells were less likely to form metastases in the pres Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Help With Weight Loss? (the Answer Is Yes & Here’s Why)

Does Metformin Help With Weight Loss? (the Answer Is Yes & Here’s Why)

Metformin may be one of the cheapest and most underused weight loss medications out there. Metformin is traditionally reserved for those with diabetes or insulin resistance, but many studies show that it can be effective in overweight or obese patients without diabetes. The only problem? You wouldn't know about it unless you do the research yourself! Use this post to learn everything you need to know about using metformin (both if you have diabetes or if you are simply just overweight): Metformin & How it May Help With Weight Loss Does metformin help with weight loss? The answer is more complex than just a standard "yes" or "no", instead the correct answer is more of a "maybe". What do I mean? Well metformin is a medication that falls into the class of biguanides. The most popular of these medications is metformin (and the topic of our discussion today) which is being used by at least 120 million people worldwide. Classically, metformin is used to treat blood sugar issues, insulin resistance and type II diabetes. It was found a long time ago, that if used for these conditions, metformin does indeed help some patients lose weight. Studies have shown that patients who take metformin with insulin resistance do tend to lose weight - most studies showing a "modest" amount to the tune of around 5-10 pounds. Because these studies have been favorable to some patients (especially those with the conditions listed above), it's normal to ask if it also works for patients who don't have type II diabetes. In order to understand that, we need to understand how metformin works. As it relates to weight loss metformin has powerful actions in 2 main areas: In the mitochondria respiratory chain complex: Activating the mitochondrial pathway is a powerful way to increase energy production an Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

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